Title

Activity monitor intervention to promote physical activity of physicians-in-training: randomized controlled trial.

Year of Publication

2014

Number of Pages

e100251

Date Published

2014

ISSN Number

1932-6203

Abstract

<p><strong>BACKGROUND: </strong>Physicians are expected to serve as role models for healthy lifestyles, but long work hours reduce time for healthy behaviors. A hospital-based physical activity intervention could improve physician health and increase counseling about exercise.</p>

<p><strong>METHODS: </strong>We conducted a two-phase intervention among 104 medical residents at a large hospital in Boston, Massachusetts. Phase 1 was a 6-week randomized controlled trial comparing daily steps of residents assigned to an activity monitor displaying feedback about steps and energy consumed (intervention) or to a blinded monitor (control). Phase 2 immediately followed and was a 6-week non-randomized team steps competition in which all participants wore monitors with feedback. Phase 1 outcomes were: 1) median steps/day and 2) proportion of days activity monitor worn. The Phase 2 outcome was mean steps/day on days monitor worn (≥500 steps/day). Physiologic measurements were collected at baseline and study end. Median steps/day were compared using Wilcoxon rank-sum tests. Mean steps were compared using repeated measures regression analyses.</p>

<p><strong>RESULTS: </strong>In Phase 1, intervention and control groups had similar activity (6369 vs. 6063 steps/day, p = 0.16) and compliance with wearing the monitor (77% vs. 77% of days, p = 0.73). In Phase 2 (team competition), residents recorded more steps/day than during Phase 1 (CONTROL: 7,971 vs. 7,567, p = 0.002;</p>

<p><strong>INTERVENTION: </strong>7,832 vs. 7,739, p = 0.13). Mean compliance with wearing the activity monitor decreased for both groups during Phase 2 compared to Phase 1 (60% vs. 77%, p&lt;0.001). Mean systolic blood pressure decreased (p = 0.004) and HDL cholesterol increased (p&lt;0.001) among all participants at end of study compared to baseline.</p>

<p><strong>CONCLUSIONS: </strong>Although the activity monitor intervention did not have a major impact on activity or health, the high participation rates of busy residents and modest changes in steps, blood pressure, and HDL suggest that more intensive hospital-based wellness programs have potential for promoting healthier lifestyles among physicians.</p>

<p><strong>TRIAL REGISTRATION: </strong>Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01287208.</p>

DOI

10.1371/journal.pone.0100251

Alternate Title

PLoS ONE

PMID

24950218

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