First name
Kelly
Middle name
D
Last name
Getz

Title

Absolute lymphocyte count recovery following initial acute myelogenous leukemia therapy: Implications for adoptive cell therapy.

Year of Publication

2022

Number of Pages

e30062

Date Published

11/2022

ISSN Number

1545-5017

Abstract

BACKGROUND: An adequate absolute lymphocyte count (ALC) is an essential first step in autologous chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell manufacturing. For patients with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML), the intensity of chemotherapy received may affect adequate ALC recovery required for CAR T-cell production. We sought to analyze ALC following each course of upfront therapy as one metric for CAR T-cell manufacturing feasibility in children and young adults with AML.

PROCEDURE: ALC data were collected from an observational study of patients with newly diagnosed AML between the ages of 1 month and 21 years who received treatment between the years of 2006 and 2018 at one of three hospitals in the Leukemia Electronic Abstraction of Records Network (LEARN) consortium.

RESULTS: Among 193 patients with sufficient ALC data for analysis, the median ALC following induction 1 was 1715 cells/μl (interquartile range: 1166-2388), with successive decreases in ALC with each subsequent course. Similarly, the proportion of patients achieving an ALC >400 cells/μl decreased following each course, ranging from 98.4% (190/193) after course 1 to 66.7% (22/33) for patients who received a fifth course of therapy.

CONCLUSIONS: There is a successive decline of ALC recovery with subsequent courses of chemotherapy. Despite this decline, ALC values are likely sufficient to consider apheresis prior to the initiation of each course of upfront therapy for the majority of newly diagnosed pediatric AML patients, thereby providing a window of opportunity for T-cell collection for those patients identified at high risk of relapse or with refractory disease.

DOI

10.1002/pbc.30062

Alternate Title

Pediatr Blood Cancer

PMID

36370087

Title

Rates of laboratory adverse events by course in paediatric leukaemia ascertained with automated electronic health record extraction: a retrospective cohort study from the Children's Oncology Group.

Year of Publication

2022

Number of Pages

e678-e688

Date Published

07/2022

ISSN Number

2352-3026

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Adverse events are often misreported in clinical trials, leading to an incomplete understanding of toxicities. We aimed to test automated laboratory adverse event ascertainment and grading (via the ExtractEHR automated package) to assess its scalability and define adverse event rates for children with acute myeloid leukaemia and acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

METHODS: For this retrospective cohort study from the Children's Oncology Group (COG), we included patients aged 0-22 years treated for acute myeloid leukaemia or acute lymphoblastic leukaemia at Children's Healthcare of Atlanta (Atlanta, GA, USA) from Jan 1, 2010, to Nov 1, 2018, at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (Philadelphia, PA, USA) from Jan 1, 2011, to Dec 31, 2014, and at the Texas Children's Hospital (Houston, TX, USA) from Jan 1, 2011, to Dec 31, 2014. The ExtractEHR automated package acquired, cleaned, and graded laboratory data as per Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE) version 5 for 22 commonly evaluated grade 3-4 adverse events (fatal events were not evaluated) with numerically based CTCAE definitions. Descriptive statistics tabulated adverse event frequencies. Adverse events ascertained by ExtractEHR were compared to manually reported adverse events for patients enrolled in two COG trials (AAML1031, NCT01371981; AALL0932, NCT02883049). Analyses were restricted to protocol-defined chemotherapy courses (induction I, induction II, intensification I, intensification II, and intensification III for acute myeloid leukaemia; induction, consolidation, interim maintenance, delayed intensification, and maintenance for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia).

FINDINGS: Laboratory adverse event data from 1077 patients (583 from Children's Healthcare of Atlanta, 200 from the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, and 294 from the Texas Children's Hospital) who underwent 4611 courses (549 for acute myeloid leukaemia and 4062 for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia) were extracted, processed, and graded. Of the 166 patients with acute myeloid leukaemia, 86 (52%) were female, 80 (48%) were male, 96 (58%) were White, and 132 (80%) were non-Hispanic. Of the 911 patients with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia, 406 (45%) were female, 505 (55%) were male, 596 (65%) were White, and 641 (70%) were non-Hispanic. Patients with acute myeloid leukaemia had the most adverse events during induction I and intensification II. Hypokalaemia (one [17%] of six to 75 [48%] of 156 courses) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) increased (13 [10%] of 134 to 27 [17%] of 156 courses) were the most prevalent non-haematological adverse events in patients with acute myeloid leukaemia, as identified by ExtractEHR. Patients with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia had the greatest number of adverse events during induction and maintenance (eight adverse events with prevalence ≥10%; induction and maintenance: anaemia, platelet count decreased, white blood cell count decreased, neutrophil count decreased, lymphocyte count decreased, ALT increased, and hypocalcaemia; induction: hypokalaemia; maintenance: aspartate aminotransferase [AST] increased and blood bilirubin increased), as identified by ExtractEHR. 187 (85%) of 220 total comparisons in 22 adverse events in four AAML1031 and six AALL0923 courses were substantially higher with ExtractEHR than COG-reported adverse event rates for adverse events with a prevalence of at least 2%.

INTERPRETATION: ExtractEHR is scalable and accurately defines laboratory adverse event rates for paediatric acute leukaemia; moreover, ExtractEHR seems to detect higher rates of laboratory adverse events than those reported in COG trials. These rates can be used for comparisons between therapies and to counsel patients treated on or off trials about the risks of chemotherapy. ExtractEHR-based adverse event ascertainment can improve reporting of laboratory adverse events in clinical trials.

FUNDING: US National Institutes of Health, St Baldrick's Foundation, and Alex's Lemonade Stand Foundation.

DOI

10.1016/S2352-3026(22)00168-5

Alternate Title

Lancet Haematol

PMID

35870472

Title

Rates of laboratory adverse events by course in paediatric leukaemia ascertained with automated electronic health record extraction: a retrospective cohort study from the Children's Oncology Group.

Year of Publication

2022

Number of Pages

e678-e688

Date Published

07/2022

ISSN Number

2352-3026

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Adverse events are often misreported in clinical trials, leading to an incomplete understanding of toxicities. We aimed to test automated laboratory adverse event ascertainment and grading (via the ExtractEHR automated package) to assess its scalability and define adverse event rates for children with acute myeloid leukaemia and acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

METHODS: For this retrospective cohort study from the Children's Oncology Group (COG), we included patients aged 0-22 years treated for acute myeloid leukaemia or acute lymphoblastic leukaemia at Children's Healthcare of Atlanta (Atlanta, GA, USA) from Jan 1, 2010, to Nov 1, 2018, at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (Philadelphia, PA, USA) from Jan 1, 2011, to Dec 31, 2014, and at the Texas Children's Hospital (Houston, TX, USA) from Jan 1, 2011, to Dec 31, 2014. The ExtractEHR automated package acquired, cleaned, and graded laboratory data as per Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE) version 5 for 22 commonly evaluated grade 3-4 adverse events (fatal events were not evaluated) with numerically based CTCAE definitions. Descriptive statistics tabulated adverse event frequencies. Adverse events ascertained by ExtractEHR were compared to manually reported adverse events for patients enrolled in two COG trials (AAML1031, NCT01371981; AALL0932, NCT02883049). Analyses were restricted to protocol-defined chemotherapy courses (induction I, induction II, intensification I, intensification II, and intensification III for acute myeloid leukaemia; induction, consolidation, interim maintenance, delayed intensification, and maintenance for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia).

FINDINGS: Laboratory adverse event data from 1077 patients (583 from Children's Healthcare of Atlanta, 200 from the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, and 294 from the Texas Children's Hospital) who underwent 4611 courses (549 for acute myeloid leukaemia and 4062 for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia) were extracted, processed, and graded. Of the 166 patients with acute myeloid leukaemia, 86 (52%) were female, 80 (48%) were male, 96 (58%) were White, and 132 (80%) were non-Hispanic. Of the 911 patients with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia, 406 (45%) were female, 505 (55%) were male, 596 (65%) were White, and 641 (70%) were non-Hispanic. Patients with acute myeloid leukaemia had the most adverse events during induction I and intensification II. Hypokalaemia (one [17%] of six to 75 [48%] of 156 courses) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) increased (13 [10%] of 134 to 27 [17%] of 156 courses) were the most prevalent non-haematological adverse events in patients with acute myeloid leukaemia, as identified by ExtractEHR. Patients with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia had the greatest number of adverse events during induction and maintenance (eight adverse events with prevalence ≥10%; induction and maintenance: anaemia, platelet count decreased, white blood cell count decreased, neutrophil count decreased, lymphocyte count decreased, ALT increased, and hypocalcaemia; induction: hypokalaemia; maintenance: aspartate aminotransferase [AST] increased and blood bilirubin increased), as identified by ExtractEHR. 187 (85%) of 220 total comparisons in 22 adverse events in four AAML1031 and six AALL0923 courses were substantially higher with ExtractEHR than COG-reported adverse event rates for adverse events with a prevalence of at least 2%.

INTERPRETATION: ExtractEHR is scalable and accurately defines laboratory adverse event rates for paediatric acute leukaemia; moreover, ExtractEHR seems to detect higher rates of laboratory adverse events than those reported in COG trials. These rates can be used for comparisons between therapies and to counsel patients treated on or off trials about the risks of chemotherapy. ExtractEHR-based adverse event ascertainment can improve reporting of laboratory adverse events in clinical trials.

FUNDING: US National Institutes of Health, St Baldrick's Foundation, and Alex's Lemonade Stand Foundation.

DOI

10.1016/S2352-3026(22)00168-5

Alternate Title

Lancet Haematol

PMID

35870472

Title

Successful merging of data from the United Network for Organ Sharing and the Pediatric Health Information System databases.

Year of Publication

2018

Number of Pages

e13168

Date Published

2018 Aug

ISSN Number

1399-3046

Abstract

Data routinely collected through United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS) lack the detailed information on medical resource utilization and treatment costs required to accomplish for center-level comparisons of quality of care and cost for pediatric heart transplantation. We aimed to overcome this limitation by merging UNOS with the Pediatric Health Information System (PHIS) database, an administrative database containing inpatient, emergency department, ambulatory surgery, and observation unit information from over 40 not-for-profit, tertiary care pediatric hospitals. Utilizing a probabilistic match based on center, date of birth, recipient gender, and transplant date within ±2 days, more than 90% of eligible UNOS patients (N = 2264) were successfully merged to their corresponding PHIS records. Thirty-day and 1-year mortality rates observed for the merged cohort (3.2% and 9.0%, respectively) were compared with those previously reported for pediatric heart transplants, as were the significant predictors of increased mortality. These results demonstrate that the established UNOS-PHIS cohort will provide a valid platform for subsequent research aimed at identifying center-level differences that could be exploited to optimize quality of care while minimizing cost across institutions.

DOI

10.1111/petr.13168

Alternate Title

Pediatr Transplant

PMID

29635813

Title

Risk of bacterial bloodstream infection does not vary by central-line type during neutropenic periods in pediatric acute myeloid leukemia.

Year of Publication

2022

Number of Pages

1-8

Date Published

2022 Apr 25

ISSN Number

1559-6834

Abstract

<p><strong>BACKGROUND: </strong>Bloodstream infections (BSIs) are a frequent cause of morbidity in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML), due in part to the presence of central venous access devices (CVADs) required to deliver therapy.</p>

<p><strong>OBJECTIVE: </strong>To determine the differential risk of bacterial BSI during neutropenia by CVAD type in pediatric patients with AML.</p>

<p><strong>METHODS: </strong>We performed a secondary analysis in a cohort of 560 pediatric patients (1,828 chemotherapy courses) receiving frontline AML chemotherapy at 17 US centers. The exposure was CVAD type at course start: tunneled externalized catheter (TEC), peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC), or totally implanted catheter (TIC). The primary outcome was course-specific incident bacterial BSI; secondary outcomes included mucosal barrier injury (MBI)-BSI and non-MBI BSI. Poisson regression was used to compute adjusted rate ratios comparing BSI occurrence during neutropenia by line type, controlling for demographic, clinical, and hospital-level characteristics.</p>

<p><strong>RESULTS: </strong>The rate of BSI did not differ by CVAD type: 11 BSIs per 1,000 neutropenic days for TECs, 13.7 for PICCs, and 10.7 for TICs. After adjustment, there was no statistically significant association between CVAD type and BSI: PICC incident rate ratio [IRR] = 1.00 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.75-1.32) and TIC IRR = 0.83 (95% CI, 0.49-1.41) compared to TEC. When MBI and non-MBI were examined separately, results were similar.</p>

<p><strong>CONCLUSIONS: </strong>In this large, multicenter cohort of pediatric AML patients, we found no difference in the rate of BSI during neutropenia by CVAD type. This may be due to a risk-profile for BSI that is unique to AML patients.</p>

DOI

10.1017/ice.2022.82

Alternate Title

Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol

PMID

35465865

Title

Adherence to and determinants of guideline-recommended biomarker testing and targeted therapy in patients with gastroesophageal adenocarcinoma: Insights from routine practice.

Year of Publication

2021

Number of Pages

2562-2570

Date Published

2021 07 15

ISSN Number

1097-0142

Abstract

<p><strong>BACKGROUND: </strong>Anti human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (anti-HER2) therapy with trastuzumab improves overall survival in patients with advanced, HER2-positive gastroesophageal adenocarcinoma (GEA) and is now incorporated into national guidelines. However, little is known about adherence to and determinants of timely HER2 testing and trastuzumab initiation in routine practice.</p>

<p><strong>METHODS: </strong>The authors performed a cross-sectional study of patients who had advanced GEA diagnosed between January 2011 and June 2019 in a nationwide electronic health record-derived database. The annual prevalences of both timely HER2 testing (defined within 21 days after advanced diagnosis) and timely trastuzumab initiation (defined within 14 days after a positive HER2 result) were calculated. Log-binomial regressions estimated adjusted prevalence ratios comparing timely HER2 testing and trastuzumab initiation by patient and tumor characteristics.</p>

<p><strong>RESULTS: </strong>In total, the cohort included 6032 patients with advanced GEA of whom 1007 were HER2-positive. Between 2011 and 2019, timely HER2 testing increased from 22.4% to 44.5%, whereas timely trastuzumab initiation remained stable at 16.3%. No appreciable differences in timely testing or trastuzumab initiation were noted by age, sex, race, or insurance status. Compared with patients who had metastatic disease at diagnosis, patients who had early stage GEA who did not undergo surgery were less likely to receive timely HER2 testing and trastuzumab initiation (testing prevalence ratio, 0.69; 95% CI, 0.64-0.75; treatment prevalence ratio, 0.32; 95% CI, 0.18-0.56), as were patients with early stage disease who subsequently developed a distant recurrence (testing prevalence ratio, 0.56; 95% CI, 0.47-0.65; treatment prevalence ratio, 0.61; 95% CI, 0.24-1.55).</p>

<p><strong>CONCLUSIONS: </strong>In patients with advanced GEA, guideline-recommended HER2 testing and anti-HER2 therapy remain underused. Uptake may improve with universal HER2 testing regardless of stage.</p>

DOI

10.1002/cncr.33514

Alternate Title

Cancer

PMID

33730386

Title

Characteristics Associated with Tumor Development in Individuals Diagnosed with Beckwith-Wiedemann Spectrum: Novel Tumor-(epi)Genotype-Phenotype Associations in the BWSp Population.

Year of Publication

2021

Date Published

2021 11 21

ISSN Number

2073-4425

Abstract

<p>Beckwith-Wiedemann Spectrum (BWSp) is the most common epigenetic childhood cancer predisposition disorder. BWSp is caused by (epi)genetic changes affecting the BWS critical region on chromosome 11p15. Clinically, BWSp represents complex molecular and phenotypic heterogeneity resulting in a range of presentations from Classic BWS to milder features. The previously reported tumor risk based on Classic BWS cohorts is 8-10% and routine tumor screening has been recommended. This work investigated the tumor risk and correlation with phenotype within a cohort of patients from Classic BWS to BWSp using a mixed-methods approach to explore phenotype and epigenotype profiles associated with tumor development through statistical analyses with post-hoc retrospective case series review. We demonstrated that tumor risk across BWSp differs from Classic BWS and that certain phenotypic features are associated with specific epigenetic causes; nephromegaly and/or hyperinsulinism appear associated with cancer in some patients. We also demonstrated that prenatal and perinatal factors that are not currently part of the BWSp classification may factor into tumor risk. Additionally, blood testing results are not necessarily synonymous with tissue testing results. Together, it appears that the current understanding from Classic BWS of (epi)genetics and phenotype correlations with tumors is not represented in the BWSp. Further study is needed in this complex population.</p>

DOI

10.3390/genes12111839

Alternate Title

Genes (Basel)

PMID

34828445

Title

Acute Left Ventricular Dysfunction Following Gemtuzumab Ozogamicin in Two Pediatric AML Patients.

Year of Publication

2022

Number of Pages

e507-e511

Date Published

2022 Mar 01

ISSN Number

1536-3678

Abstract

<p>Gemtuzumab ozogamicin (GO) is an anti-CD33 antibody-tumor antibiotic conjugate with proven efficacy in pediatric and adult patients with CD33+ acute myeloid leukemia. Adverse effects commonly associated with GO include hyperbilirubinemia, elevated transaminases, and sinusoidal obstruction syndrome. Cardiotoxicity has not been a commonly described adverse event. We describe 2 pediatric patients with relapsed/refractory acute myeloid leukemia who received fractionated GO monotherapy and subsequently developed severe acute left ventricular dysfunction. Both patients achieved remission, recovered cardiac function with medical therapy, and tolerated subsequent stem cell transplantation.</p>

DOI

10.1097/MPH.0000000000002325

Alternate Title

J Pediatr Hematol Oncol

PMID

35200224

Title

A report from the Leukemia Electronic Abstraction of Records Network on risk of hepatotoxicity during pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia treatment.

Year of Publication

2022

Date Published

2022 Jan 27

ISSN Number

1592-8721

Abstract

<p>Not available.</p>

DOI

10.3324/haematol.2021.279805

Alternate Title

Haematologica

PMID

35081687

Title

Risk Factors for Treatment Refractory and Relapsed Optic Pathway Glioma in Children with Neurofibromatosis Type 1.

Year of Publication

2022

Date Published

2022 Jan 09

ISSN Number

1523-5866

Abstract

<p><strong>BACKGROUND: </strong>Nearly one-third of patients with neurofibromatosis type 1-associated optic pathway glioma (NF1-OPG) fail frontline chemotherapy; however, little is known about risk factors for treatment failure.</p>

<p><strong>METHODS: </strong>We performed a retrospective multi-institutional cohort study to identify baseline risk factors for treatment-refractory/relapsed disease and poor visual outcome in children with NF1-OPG. Refractory/relapsed NF1-OPG was defined as requirement of two or more treatment regimens due to progression or relapse.</p>

<p><strong>RESULTS: </strong>Of 111 subjects eligible for inclusion, adequate clinical and visual data were available for 103 subjects from 7 institutions. Median follow-up from initiation of first chemotherapy regimen was 95 months (range 13-185). Eighty-four (82%) subjects received carboplatin-based frontline chemotherapy. Forty-five subjects (44%) experienced refractory/relapsed disease, with median time of 21.5 months (range 2-149) from initiation of first treatment to start of second treatment. The proportion of patients without refractory/relapsed disease at 2 and 5 years was 78% and 60%. In multivariable analyses, age less than 24 months at initial treatment, posterior tumor location, and familial inheritance were associated with refractory/relapsed NF1-OPG by 2 years. Both age less than 24 months and posterior tumor location were associated with refractory/relapsed NF1-OPG by 5 years. Subjects with moderate to severe vision loss at last follow-up were more likely to have posterior tumor location, optic disc abnormalities, or abnormal visual acuity at initial treatment.</p>

<p><strong>CONCLUSION: </strong>Young age, posterior tumor location, and optic disc abnormalities may identify patients with the greatest likelihood of refractory/relapsed NF1-OPG and poor visual outcomes, and who may benefit from newer treatment strategies.</p>

DOI

10.1093/neuonc/noac013

Alternate Title

Neuro Oncol

PMID

35018469

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