First name
Diego
Last name
Campos

Title

Validation of the Pediatric Sequential Organ Failure Assessment Score and Evaluation of Third International Consensus Definitions for Sepsis and Septic Shock Definitions in the Pediatric Emergency Department.

Year of Publication

2022

Number of Pages

672-678

Date Published

05/2022

ISSN Number

2168-6211

Abstract

Importance: Pediatric sepsis definitions have evolved, and some have proposed using the measure used in adults to quantify organ dysfunction, a Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score of 2 or more in the setting of suspected infection. A pediatric adaptation of SOFA (pSOFA) showed excellent discrimination for mortality in critically ill children but has not been evaluated in an emergency department (ED) population.

Objective: To delineate test characteristics of the pSOFA score for predicting in-hospital mortality among (1) all patients and (2) patients with suspected infection treated in pediatric EDs.

Design, Setting, and Participants: This retrospective cohort study took place from January 1, 2012, to January 31, 2020 in 9 US children's hospitals included in the Pediatric Emergency Care Applied Research Network (PECARN) Registry. The data was analyzed from February 1, 2020, to April 18, 2022. All ED visits for patients younger than 18 years were included.

Exposures: ED pSOFA score was assigned by summing maximum pSOFA organ dysfunction components during ED stay (each 0-4 points). In the subset with suspected infection, visit meeting criteria for sepsis (suspected infection with a pSOFA score of 2 or more) and septic shock (suspected infection with vasoactive infusion and serum lactate level >18.0 mg/dL) were identified.

Main Outcomes and Measures: Test characteristics of pSOFA scores of 2 or more during the ED stay for hospital mortality.

Results: A total of 3 999 528 (female, 47.3%) ED visits were included. pSOFA scores ranged from 0 to 16, with 126 250 visits (3.2%) having a pSOFA score of 2 or more. pSOFA scores of 2 or more had sensitivity of 0.65 (95% CI, 0.62-0.67) and specificity of 0.97 (95% CI, 0.97-0.97), with negative predictive value of 1.0 (95% CI, 1.00-1.00) in predicting hospital mortality. Of 642 868 patients with suspected infection (16.1%), 42 992 (6.7%) met criteria for sepsis, and 374 (0.1%) met criteria for septic shock. Hospital mortality rates for suspected infection (599 502), sepsis (42 992), and septic shock (374) were 0.0%, 0.9%, and 8.0%, respectively. The pSOFA score had similar discrimination for hospital mortality in all ED visits (area under receiver operating characteristic curve, 0.81; 95% CI, 0.79-0.82) and the subset with suspected infection (area under receiver operating characteristic curve, 0.82; 95% CI, 0.80-0.84).

Conclusions and Relevance: In a large, multicenter study of pediatric ED visits, a pSOFA score of 2 or more was uncommon and associated with increased hospital mortality yet had poor sensitivity as a screening tool for hospital mortality. Conversely, children with a pSOFA score of 2 or less were at very low risk of death, with high specificity and negative predictive value. Among patients with suspected infection, patients with pSOFA-defined septic shock demonstrated the highest mortality.

DOI

10.1001/jamapediatrics.2022.1301

Alternate Title

JAMA Pediatr

PMID

35575803

Title

The Design of a Data Management System for a Multicenter Palliative Care Cohort Study.

Year of Publication

2022

Date Published

2022 Mar 23

ISSN Number

1873-6513

Abstract

<p><strong>CONTEXT: </strong>Prospective cohort studies of individuals with serious illness and their family members, such as children receiving palliative care and their parents, pose challenges regarding data management.</p>

<p><strong>OBJECTIVE: </strong>To describe the design and lessons learned regarding the data management system for the Pediatric Palliative Care Research Network's SHAred Data and REsearch (SHARE) project, a multicenter prospective cohort study of children receiving pediatric palliative care (PPC) and their parents, and to describe important attributes of this system, with specific considerations for the design of future studies.</p>

<p><strong>METHODS: </strong>The SHARE study consists of 643 PPC patients and up to two of their parents who enrolled from April 2017 to December 2020 at 7 children's hospitals across the United States. Data regarding demographics, patient symptoms, goals of care, and other characteristics were collected directly from parents or patients at 6 timepoints over a 24-month follow-up period and stored electronically in a centralized location. Using medical record numbers, primary collected data was linked to administrative hospitalization data containing diagnostic and procedure codes and other data elements. Important attributes of the data infrastructure include linkage of primary and administrative data; centralized availability of multilingual questionnaires; electronic data collection and storage system; time-stamping of instrument completion; and a separate but connected study administrative database used to track enrollment.</p>

<p><strong>CONCLUSIONS: </strong>Investigators planning future multicenter prospective cohort studies can consider attributes of the data infrastructure we describe when designing their data management system.</p>

DOI

10.1016/j.jpainsymman.2022.03.006

Alternate Title

J Pain Symptom Manage

PMID

35339611

Title

The Pediatric Emergency Care Applied Research Network Registry: A Multicenter Electronic Health Record Registry of Pediatric Emergency Care.

Year of Publication

2018

Number of Pages

366-376

Date Published

2018 Apr

ISSN Number

1869-0327

Abstract

<p><strong>BACKGROUND: </strong> Electronic health record (EHR)-based registries allow for robust data to be derived directly from the patient clinical record and can provide important information about processes of care delivery and patient health outcomes.</p>

<p><strong>METHODS: </strong> A data dictionary, and subsequent data model, were developed describing EHR data sources to include all processes of care within the emergency department (ED). ED visit data were deidentified and XML files were created and submitted to a central data coordinating center for inclusion in the registry. Automated data quality control occurred prior to submission through an application created for this project. Data quality reports were created for manual data quality review.</p>

<p><strong>RESULTS: </strong> The Pediatric Emergency Care Applied Research Network (PECARN) Registry, representing four hospital systems and seven EDs, demonstrates that ED data from disparate health systems and EHR vendors can be harmonized for use in a single registry with a common data model. The current PECARN Registry represents data from 2,019,461 pediatric ED visits, 894,503 distinct patients, more than 12.5 million narrative reports, and 12,469,754 laboratory tests and continues to accrue data monthly.</p>

<p><strong>CONCLUSION: </strong> The Registry is a robust harmonized clinical registry that includes data from diverse patients, sites, and EHR vendors derived via data extraction, deidentification, and secure submission to a central data coordinating center. The data provided may be used for benchmarking, clinical quality improvement, and comparative effectiveness research.</p>

DOI

10.1055/s-0038-1651496

Alternate Title

Appl Clin Inform

PMID

29791930

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