First name
Charlene
Middle name
A
Last name
Wong

Title

Low-Income Working Families With Employer-Sponsored Insurance Turn To Public Insurance For Their Children.

Year of Publication

2016

Number of Pages

2302-2309

Date Published

2016 Dec 01

ISSN Number

1544-5208

Abstract

<p>Many families rely on employer-sponsored health insurance for their children. However, the rise in the cost of such insurance has outpaced growth in family income, potentially making public insurance (Medicaid or the Children's Health Insurance Plan) an attractive alternative for affordable dependent coverage. Using data for 2008-13 from the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey, we quantified the coverage rates for children from low- or moderate-income households in which a parent was offered employer-sponsored insurance. Among families in which parents were covered by such insurance, the proportion of children without employer-sponsored coverage increased from 22.5&nbsp;percent in 2008 to 25.0&nbsp;percent in 2013. The percentage of children with public insurance when a parent was covered by employer-sponsored insurance increased from 12.1&nbsp;percent in 2008 to 15.2&nbsp;percent in 2013. This trend was most pronounced for families with incomes of 100-199&nbsp;percent of the federal poverty level, for whom the share of children with public insurance increased from 22.8&nbsp;percent to 29.9&nbsp;percent. Among families with incomes of 200-299&nbsp;percent of poverty, uninsurance rates for children increased from 6.0&nbsp;percent to 9.2&nbsp;percent. These findings suggest a movement away from employer-sponsored insurance and toward public insurance for children in low-income families, and growth in uninsurance among children in moderate-income families.</p>

DOI

10.1377/hlthaff.2016.0381

Alternate Title

Health Aff (Millwood)

PMID

27920320

Title

Changes in Young Adult Primary Care Under the Affordable Care Act.

Year of Publication

2015

Number of Pages

S680-5

Date Published

2015 Nov

ISSN Number

1541-0048

Abstract

<p><strong>OBJECTIVES: </strong>We sought to describe changes in young adults' routine care and usual sources of care (USCs), according to provider specialty, after implementation of extended dependent coverage under the Affordable Care Act (ACA) in 2010.</p>

<p><strong>METHODS: </strong>We used Medical Expenditure Panel Survey data from 2006 to 2012 to examine young adults' receipt of routine care in the preceding year, identification of a USC, and USC provider specialties (pediatrics, family medicine, internal medicine, and obstetrics and gynecology).</p>

<p><strong>RESULTS: </strong>The percentage of young adults who sought routine care increased from 42.4% in 2006 to 49.5% in 2012 (P &lt; .001). The percentage identifying a USC remained stable at approximately 60%. Among young adults with a USC, there was a trend between 2006 and 2012 toward increasing percentages with pediatric (7.6% vs 9.1%) and family medicine (75.9% vs 80.9%) providers and declining percentages with internal medicine (11.5% vs 7.6%) and obstetrics and gynecology (5.0% vs 2.5%) providers.</p>

<p><strong>CONCLUSIONS: </strong>Efforts under the ACA to increase health insurance coverage had favorable effects on young adults' use of routine care. Monitoring routine care use and USC choices in this group can inform primary care workforce needs and graduate medical education priorities across specialties.</p>

DOI

10.2105/AJPH.2015.302770

Alternate Title

Am J Public Health

PMID

26447914

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