First name
Spandana
Last name
Makeneni

Title

The Relationship Between Directly Observed Therapy for Chlamydia Infections and Retesting Rates in an Adolescent Population.

Year of Publication

2023

Number of Pages

Date Published

02/2023

ISSN Number

1537-4521

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Chlamydia trachomatis is the most common reportable sexually transmitted infection (STI) in the United States, with >60% of reported cases occurring in individuals aged 15-24. US practice guidelines recommend directly observed therapy (DOT) for the treatment of chlamydia in adolescents, but almost no research has been done to evaluate whether DOT results in improved outcomes.

METHODS: We conducted a retrospective cohort study of adolescents who sought care at one of three clinics within a large academic pediatric health system for a chlamydia infection. The study outcome was return for retesting within six months. Unadjusted analyses were performed using chi-square, Mann-Whitney U, and t-tests, and adjusted analyses were performed using multivariable logistic regression.

RESULTS: Of the 1,970 individuals included in the analysis, 1,660 (84.3%) received DOT and 310 (15.7%) had a prescription sent to a pharmacy. The population was primarily Black/African American (95.7%) and female (78.2%). After controlling for confounders, individuals who had a prescription sent to a pharmacy were 49% (95%CI: 31-62%) less likely than individuals who received DOT to return for retesting within six months.

CONCLUSIONS: Despite clinical guidelines recommending the use of DOT for chlamydia treatment in adolescents, this is the first study to describe the association between DOT and an increase in the number of adolescents and young adults who return for STI retesting within six months. Further research is needed to confirm this finding in diverse populations and explore non-traditional settings for the provision of DOT.

DOI

10.1097/OLQ.0000000000001790

Alternate Title

Sex Transm Dis

PMID

36863059
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Title

Measuring quality STI care among adolescent female primary care patients in Philadelphia.

Year of Publication

2023

Number of Pages

Date Published

03/2023

ISSN Number

1472-3263

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: Engagement in guideline-recommended sexually transmitted infection (STI) care is fundamental to ending the STI epidemic in the USA. However, the US 2021-2025 STI National Strategic Plan and STI surveillance reports do not include a framework to measure quality STI care delivery. This study developed and applied an STI Care Continuum that can be used across settings to improve STI care quality, assess adherence to guideline-recommended care and standardise the measurement of progress towards National Strategic goals.

METHODS: Review of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention STI Treatment guidelines identified seven distinct steps of STI care for gonorrhoea, chlamydia and syphilis: (1) STI testing indication, (2) STI test completion, (3) HIV testing, (4) STI diagnosis, (5) partner services, (6) STI treatment and (7) STI retesting. Steps 1-4, 6 and 7 for gonorrhoea and/or chlamydia (GC/CT) were measured among females aged 16-17 years with a clinic visit at an academic paediatric primary care network in 2019. We used Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance Survey data to estimate step 1, and electronic health record data for steps 2, 3, 4, 6 and 7.

RESULTS: Among 5484 female patients aged 16-17 years, an estimated 44% had an STI testing indication. Among those patients, 17% were tested for HIV, of whom none tested positive, and 43% were tested for GC/CT, 19% of whom were diagnosed with GC/CT. Of these patients, 91% received treatment within 2 weeks and 67% were retested within 6 weeks to 1 year after diagnosis. On retesting, 40% were diagnosed with recurrent GC/CT.

CONCLUSIONS: Local application of an STI Care Continuum identified STI testing, retesting and HIV testing as areas for improvement. The development of an STI Care Continuum identified novel measures for monitoring progress towards National Strategic indicators. Similar methods can be applied across jurisdictions to target resources, standardise data collection and reporting and improve STI care quality.

DOI

10.1136/sextrans-2022-055623

Alternate Title

Sex Transm Infect

PMID

36868813
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No
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Title

Adherence to New CDC Chlamydia Treatment Guidelines in Adolescents: Effective Uptake and Equitable Implementation.

Year of Publication

2023

Number of Pages

63-65

Date Published

02/2023

ISSN Number

1557-7449

DOI

10.1089/apc.2022.0190

Alternate Title

AIDS Patient Care STDS

PMID

36662591
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No
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Title

The Alarm Burden of Excess Continuous Pulse Oximetry Monitoring Among Patients With Bronchiolitis.

Year of Publication

2021

Number of Pages

Date Published

2021 Nov 17

ISSN Number

1553-5606

Abstract

<p>Guidelines discourage continuous pulse oximetry monitoring of hospitalized infants with bronchiolitis who are not receiving supplemental oxygen. Excess monitoring is theorized to contribute to increased alarm burden, but this burden has not been quantified. We evaluated admissions of 201 children (aged 0-24 months) with bronchiolitis. We categorized time ≥60 minutes following discontinuation of supplemental oxygen as "continuously monitored (guideline-discordant)," "intermittently measured (guideline-concordant)," or "unable to classify." Across 4402 classifiable hours, 77% (11,101) of alarms occurred during periods of guideline-discordant monitoring. Patients experienced a median of 35 alarms (interquartile range [IQR], 10-81) during guideline-discordant, continuously monitored time, representing a rate of 6.7 alarms per hour (IQR, 2.1-12.3). In comparison, the median hourly alarm rate during periods of guideline-concordant intermittent measurement was 0.5 alarms per hour (IQR, 0.1-0.8). Reducing guideline-discordant monitoring in bronchiolitis patients would reduce nurse alarm burden.</p>

DOI

10.12788/jhm.3731

Alternate Title

J Hosp Med

PMID

34798003
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