First name
Jeremey
Middle name
J
Last name
Michel

Title

Trends in Vaccine Refusal and Acceptance Using Electronic Health Records from a Large Pediatric Hospital Network, 2013-2020: Strategies for Change.

Year of Publication

2022

Date Published

10/2022

ISSN Number

2076-393X

Abstract

Understanding trends in vaccine refusal is critical to monitor as small declines in vaccination coverage can lead to outbreaks of vaccine-preventable diseases. Using electronic heath record (EHR) data from the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia's 31 outpatient primary care sites, we created a cohort of 403,448 children less than age 20 years who received at least one visit from 1 January 2013 through 31 December 2020. The sample represented 1,449,061 annualized patient and 181,131 annualized preventive vaccination visits per year. We characterized trends in vaccine refusal and acceptance using a repeated cross-sectional observational analysis of electronic health records (EHR) data using a single annual merged observation measure for patients seen multiple times for preventive healthcare within a calendar year. Refusals were identified for 212,900 annualized patient-visit year observations, which represented 14.6% of annualized patient-visit year observations and 25.1% of annualized vaccine patient-year observations. The odds of having a refusal marker were significantly increased in patients seen in suburban practices (aOR [CI]: 2.35 [2.30-2.40, < 0.001]), in patients with increased age 11-17 years (aOR [CI]: 3.85 [3.79-3.91], < 0.001), and those eligible for the VFC program (aOR [CI]: 1.10 [1.08-1.11]. Parental refusal (61.0%) and provider decisions (32.0%) were the most common documented in progress notes for not administering vaccines, whereas contraindications (2.5%) and supply issues (1.8%) were the least common. When offered, vaccine acceptance increased for human papillomavirus, hepatitis B, measles-mumps-rubella-containing and varicella-containing vaccines and decreased for hepatitis A and meningococcal vaccines. Repeated offering of vaccines was central to increasing acceptance, in part due to increased opportunities to address specific concerns.

DOI

10.3390/vaccines10101688

Alternate Title

Vaccines (Basel)

PMID

36298553
Featured Publication
No

Title

Shared clinical decision-making on vaccines: out of sight, out of mind.

Year of Publication

2021

Date Published

2021 Aug 02

ISSN Number

1527-974X

Abstract

<p>Clinical decision support systems, which provide automated reminders in electronic health systems, are designed to provide physicians and other health professionals support in clinical decision-making. New clinical guidance from the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices on a new category of recommendations referred to as "shared clinical decision-making" have left providers struggling to interpret how to best implement recommendations for adult vaccines. The issue at hand is how to ensure that a conversation between the patient and provider occurs. While traditional clinical decision support systems have driven immunization for years, these systems support a binary default opt-in process. The goal for shared decision-making is the discussion rather than the vaccination. The recommended provider-patient conversations need to be supported with both provider guidance as well as tools to ensure vaccines are not omitted from the conversations, particularly as future vaccine candidates progress through the vaccine development pipeline.</p>

DOI

10.1093/jamia/ocab147

Alternate Title

J Am Med Inform Assoc

PMID

34338789

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