First name
Rachel
Last name
French

Title

Within-Hospital Concordance of Opioid Exposure Diagnosis Coding in Mothers and Newborns.

Year of Publication

2021

Date Published

2021 Jul 06

ISSN Number

2154-1671

Abstract

<p><strong>BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: </strong>We measured within-hospital concordance of mothers with opioid use disorder (OUD) and newborns with neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) or opioid exposure (OE). Secondarily, we described the demographics of mothers and newborns with and without opioid-related diagnoses.</p>

<p><strong>METHODS: </strong>We used hospital discharge abstracts from California, Florida, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania in 2016. Descriptive statistics were used to compare newborns and mothers with and without opioid-related diagnoses. Within-hospital frequencies of mothers with OUD and newborns with NAS and OE were compared. Pearson's correlation coefficients were calculated.</p>

<p><strong>RESULTS: </strong>In 474 hospitals, we found 896 702 mothers (0.6% with OUD) and 910 867 newborns (0.47% with NAS, 0.85% with OE, and 0.07% with both). Although the frequency of mothers and newborns with opioid-related diagnoses in a hospital was strongly correlated ( = 0.81), more infants were identified than mothers in most hospitals (68.3%). Mothers with OUD were more likely to be white (79% vs 40.9%), on Medicaid (75.4% vs 44.0%), and receive care in rural hospitals (20.6% vs 17.6%), compared with mothers without OUD. Newborns with NAS had demographics similar to women with OUD. Newborns with OE were disproportionately Black (22% vs 7%) or Hispanic (22% vs 9%).</p>

<p><strong>CONCLUSIONS: </strong>More newborns are diagnosed with opioid-related disorders than mothers are. Although infants diagnosed with NAS had demographics similar to mothers with OUD, infants with OE were more likely to be Black or Hispanic. The lack of diagnostic coding of maternal OUD and the racial differences in diagnoses warrant attention.</p>

DOI

10.1542/hpeds.2020-003863

Alternate Title

Hosp Pediatr

PMID

34230061

Title

Newborns With Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome Are Concentrated in Poorer-Quality Hospitals.

Year of Publication

2021

Date Published

2021 Mar 18

ISSN Number

2154-1671

Abstract

<p><strong>OBJECTIVES: </strong>To determine the extent to which newborns with neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) are concentrated in some hospitals as compared with newborns without NAS and whether care quality and safety differed among these hospitals. We hypothesized that newborns with NAS would be cared for in poorer-quality hospitals.</p>

<p><strong>METHODS: </strong>Secondary analysis of 3 2016 data sets: (1) the panel study of effects of changes in nursing on patient outcomes-US survey of hospital registered nurses regarding work conditions and safety, (2) inpatient discharge abstracts, and (3) the American Hospital Association annual survey. Newborns in 266 hospitals from the 4 states where the panel study of effects of changes in nursing on patient outcomes was conducted were included. We used Lorenz curves to determine if newborns with NAS were concentrated in different hospitals than newborns without NAS and whether care quality and safety differed among those hospitals. Quality and safety were assessed by staff nurses by using standard survey questions.</p>

<p><strong>RESULTS: </strong>Of the 659 403 newborns in this study, 3130 were diagnosed with noniatrogenic NAS. We found that newborns with NAS were cared for in different hospitals compared with newborns without NAS (Gini coefficient 0.62, 95% confidence interval, 0.56-0.68) and that the hospitals in which they received care were rated as having poorer quality and safety (Gini coefficient 0.12, 95% confidence interval, 0.01-0.23).</p>

<p><strong>CONCLUSIONS: </strong>Newborns with NAS are cared for in poorer-quality hospitals than other newborns. Our findings are of concern because poorer-quality care is linked to patient outcomes. As stakeholders seek to address the opioid epidemic and improve outcomes of newborns with NAS, our findings suggest the importance of examining hospital factors.</p>

DOI

10.1542/hpeds.2020-003145

Alternate Title

Hosp Pediatr

PMID

33737332

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