First name
Andrea
Middle name
J
Last name
Sharma

Title

Intrapartum group B Streptococcal prophylaxis and childhood weight gain.

Year of Publication

2021

Date Published

2021 May 06

ISSN Number

1468-2052

Abstract

<p><strong>OBJECTIVE: </strong>To determine the difference in rate of weight gain from birth to 5 years based on exposure to maternal group B streptococcal (GBS) intrapartum antibiotic prophylaxis (IAP).</p>

<p><strong>DESIGN: </strong>Retrospective cohort study of 13 804 infants.</p>

<p><strong>SETTING: </strong>Two perinatal centres and a primary paediatric care network in Philadelphia.</p>

<p><strong>PARTICIPANTS: </strong>Term infants born 2007-2012, followed longitudinally from birth to 5 years of age.</p>

<p><strong>EXPOSURES: </strong>GBS IAP defined as penicillin, ampicillin, cefazolin, clindamycin or vancomycin administered ≥4 hours prior to delivery to the mother. Reference infants were defined as born to mothers without (vaginal delivery) or with other (caesarean delivery) intrapartum antibiotic exposure.</p>

<p><strong>OUTCOMES: </strong>Difference in rate of weight change from birth to 5 years was assessed using longitudinal rate regression. Analysis was a priori stratified by delivery mode and adjusted for relevant covariates.</p>

<p><strong>RESULTS: </strong>GBS IAP was administered to mothers of 2444/13 804 (17.7%) children. GBS IAP-exposed children had a significantly elevated rate of weight gain in the first 5 years among vaginally-born (adjusted rate difference 1.44% (95% CI 0.3% to 2.6%)) and caesarean-born (3.52% (95% CI 1.9% to 5.2%)) children. At 5 years, the rate differences equated to an additional 0.24 kg among vaginally-born children and 0.60 kg among caesarean-born children.</p>

<p><strong>CONCLUSION: </strong>GBS-specific IAP was associated with a modest increase in rate of early childhood weight gain. GBS IAP is an effective intervention to prevent perinatal GBS disease-associated morbidity and mortality. However, these findings highlight the need to better understand effects of intrapartum antibiotic exposure on childhood growth and support efforts to develop alternate prevention strategies.</p>

DOI

10.1136/archdischild-2020-320638

Alternate Title

Arch Dis Child Fetal Neonatal Ed

PMID

33958387

Title

Intrapartum Antibiotic Exposure and Body Mass Index in Children.

Year of Publication

2021

Date Published

2021 Jan 25

ISSN Number

1537-6591

Abstract

<p><strong>BACKGROUND: </strong>Intrapartum antibiotic prophylaxis (IAP) reduce a newborn's risk of group B streptococcal infection (GBS) but may lead to an increased childhood body mass index (BMI).</p>

<p><strong>METHODS: </strong>Retrospective cohort study of infants (n=223,431) born 2007-2015 in an integrated healthcare system. For vaginal delivery, we compared children exposed to GBS-IAP and to any other type or duration of intrapartum antibiotics to no antibiotic exposure. For Cesarean delivery, we compared children exposed to GBS-IAP to those exposed to all other intrapartum antibiotics, including surgical prophylaxis. BMI over 5 years was compared using non-linear multivariate models with B-spline functions, stratified by delivery mode and adjusted for demographics, maternal factors, breastfeeding and childhood antibiotic exposure.</p>

<p><strong>RESULTS: </strong>In vaginal deliveries, GBS-IAP was associated with higher BMI from 0.5 to 5.0 years of age compared to no antibiotics (P&lt;0.0001 for all time points, Δ BMI at age 5 years 0.12&nbsp;kg/m 2, 95% CI 0.07 to 0.16&nbsp;kg/m 2). Other antibiotics were associated with higher BMI from 0.3 to 5.0 years of age. In Cesarean deliveries, GBS-IAP was associated with increased BMI from 0.7 years to 5.0 years of age (P&lt;0.05 for 0.7-0.8 years, P&lt;0.0001 for all other time points) compared to other antibiotics (Δ BMI at age 5 years 0.24&nbsp;kg/m 2, 95% CI 0.14 to 0.34&nbsp;kg/m 2). Breastfeeding did not modify these associations.</p>

<p><strong>CONCLUSION: </strong>GBS-IAP was associated with a small but sustained increase in BMI starting at very early age. This association highlights the need to better understand the effects of perinatal antibiotic exposure on childhood health.</p>

DOI

10.1093/cid/ciab053

Alternate Title

Clin Infect Dis

PMID

33493270

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