First name
Hongyan
Last name
Liu

Title

Impact of poverty and neighborhood opportunity on outcomes for children treated with CD19-directed CAR T-cell therapy.

Year of Publication

2022

Date Published

11/2022

ISSN Number

1528-0020

Abstract

Children living in poverty experience excess relapse and death from newly diagnosed acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). The influence of household poverty and neighborhood social determinants on outcomes from CAR T-cell therapy for relapsed/refractory (r/r) leukemia is poorly described. We identified patients with r/r CD19+ ALL/lymphoblastic lymphoma treated on CD19-directed CAR T-cell clinical trials or with commercial tisagenlecleucel from 2012 to 2020. Socioeconomic status (SES) was proxied at the household-level, with poverty-exposure defined as Medicaid-only insurance. Low neighborhood opportunity was defined by the Childhood Opportunity Index. Among 206 patients aged 1-29, 35.9% were household-poverty exposed, and 24.9% had low neighborhood opportunity. Patients unexposed to household-poverty or low-opportunity neighborhoods were more likely to receive CAR T-cell therapy with high disease burden (>25%)-a disease characteristic associated with inferior outcomes-as compared to less advantaged patients (38% vs 30%; 37% vs 26%). Complete remission (CR) rate was 93% with no significant differences by household-poverty (P = 0.334) or neighborhood opportunity (P = 0.504). In multivariate analysis, patients from low-opportunity neighborhoods experienced increased hazard of relapse as compared to others (P = 0.006, adjusted HR 2.3, 95% CI 1.3-4.1). There was no difference in hazard of death (P = 0.545, adjusted HR 1.2, 95% CI 0.6-2.4). Among children who successfully receive CAR T-cell therapy, CR and OS is equitable regardless of proxied SES and neighborhood opportunity. Children from more advantaged households and neighborhoods receive CAR T-cell therapy with higher disease burden. Investigation of multicenter outcomes and access disparities outside of clinical-trial settings is warranted. Clinical trials: NCT01626495; NCT02435849 ; NCT02374333; NCT02228096; NCT02906371.

DOI

10.1182/blood.2022017866

Alternate Title

Blood

PMID

36351239

Title

Leveraging EHR Data to Evaluate the Association of Late Recognition of Deterioration With Outcomes.

Year of Publication

2022

Number of Pages

447-460

Date Published

05/2022

ISSN Number

2154-1671

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: Emergency transfers (ETs), deterioration events with late recognition requiring ICU interventions within 1 hour of transfer, are associated with adverse outcomes. We leveraged electronic health record (EHR) data to assess the association between ETs and outcomes. We also evaluated the association between intervention timing (urgency) and outcomes.

METHODS: We conducted a propensity-score-matched study of hospitalized children requiring ICU transfer between 2015 and 2019 at a single institution. The primary exposure was ET, automatically classified using Epic Clarity Data stored in our enterprise data warehouse endotracheal tube in lines/drains/airway flowsheet, vasopressor in medication administration record, and/or ≥60 ml/kg intravenous fluids in intake/output flowsheets recorded within 1 hour of transfer. Urgent intervention was defined as interventions within 12 hours of transfer.

RESULTS: Of 2037 index transfers, 129 (6.3%) met ET criteria. In the propensity-score-matched cohort (127 ET, 374 matched controls), ET was associated with higher in-hospital mortality (13% vs 6.1%; odds ratio, 2.47; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.24-4.9, P = .01), longer ICU length of stay (subdistribution hazard ratio of ICU discharge 0.74; 95% CI, 0.61-0.91, P < .01), and longer posttransfer length of stay (SHR of hospital discharge 0.71; 95% CI, 0.56-0.90, P < .01). Increased intervention urgency was associated with increased mortality risk: 4.1% no intervention, 6.4% urgent intervention, and 10% emergent intervention.

CONCLUSIONS: An EHR measure of deterioration with late recognition is associated with increased mortality and length of stay. Mortality risk increased with intervention urgency. Leveraging EHR automation facilitates generalizability, multicenter collaboratives, and metric consistency.

DOI

10.1542/hpeds.2021-006363

Alternate Title

Hosp Pediatr

PMID

35470399

Title

Impact of high-risk cytogenetics on outcomes for children and young adults receiving CD19-directed CAR T-cell therapy.

Year of Publication

2022

Number of Pages

2173-2185

Date Published

2022 Apr 07

ISSN Number

1528-0020

Abstract

Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell therapy can induce durable remissions of relapsed/refractory B-acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). However, case reports suggested differential outcomes mediated by leukemia cytogenetics. We identified children and young adults with relapsed/refractory CD19+ ALL/lymphoblastic lymphoma treated on 5 CD19-directed CAR T-cell (CTL019 or humanized CART19) clinical trials or with commercial tisagenlecleucel from April 2012 to April 2019. Patients were hierarchically categorized according to leukemia cytogenetics: High-risk lesions were defined as KMT2A (MLL) rearrangements, Philadelphia chromosome (Ph+), Ph-like, hypodiploidy, or TCF3/HLF; favorable as hyperdiploidy or ETV6/RUNX1; and intermediate as iAMP21, IKZF1 deletion, or TCF3/PBX1. Of 231 patients aged 1 to 29, 74 (32%) were categorized as high risk, 28 (12%) as intermediate, 43 (19%) as favorable, and 86 (37%) as uninformative. Overall complete remission rate was 94%, with no difference between strata. There was no difference in relapse-free survival (RFS; P = .8112), with 2-year RFS for the high-risk group of 63% (95% confidence interval [CI], 52-77). There was similarly no difference seen in overall survival (OS) (P = .5488), with 2-year OS for the high-risk group of 70% (95% CI, 60-82). For patients with KMT2A-rearranged infant ALL (n = 13), 2-year RFS was 67% (95% CI, 45-99), and OS was 62% (95% CI, 40-95), with multivariable analysis demonstrating no increased risk of relapse (hazard ratio, 0.70; 95% CI, 0.21-2.90; P = .7040) but a higher proportion of relapses associated with myeloid lineage switch and a 3.6-fold increased risk of all-cause death (95% CI, 1.04-12.75; P = .0434). CTL019/huCART19/tisagenlecleucel are effective at achieving durable remissions across cytogenetic categories. Relapsed/refractory patients with high-risk cytogenetics, including KMT2A-rearranged infant ALL, demonstrated high RFS and OS probabilities at 2 years.

DOI

10.1182/blood.2021012727

Alternate Title

Blood

PMID

34871373

Title

Leveraging EHR Data to Evaluate the Association of Late Recognition of Deterioration With Outcomes.

Year of Publication

2022

Number of Pages

447-460

Date Published

2022 May 01

ISSN Number

2154-1671

Abstract

<p><strong>OBJECTIVES: </strong>Emergency transfers (ETs), deterioration events with late recognition requiring ICU interventions within 1 hour of transfer, are associated with adverse outcomes. We leveraged electronic health record (EHR) data to assess the association between ETs and outcomes. We also evaluated the association between intervention timing (urgency) and outcomes.</p>

<p><strong>METHODS: </strong>We conducted a propensity-score-matched study of hospitalized children requiring ICU transfer between 2015 and 2019 at a single institution. The primary exposure was ET, automatically classified using Epic Clarity Data stored in our enterprise data warehouse endotracheal tube in lines/drains/airway flowsheet, vasopressor in medication administration record, and/or ≥60 ml/kg intravenous fluids in intake/output flowsheets recorded within 1 hour of transfer. Urgent intervention was defined as interventions within 12 hours of transfer.</p>

<p><strong>RESULTS: </strong>Of 2037 index transfers, 129 (6.3%) met ET criteria. In the propensity-score-matched cohort (127 ET, 374 matched controls), ET was associated with higher in-hospital mortality (13% vs 6.1%; odds ratio, 2.47; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.24-4.9, P = .01), longer ICU length of stay (subdistribution hazard ratio of ICU discharge 0.74; 95% CI, 0.61-0.91, P &lt; .01), and longer posttransfer length of stay (SHR of hospital discharge 0.71; 95% CI, 0.56-0.90, P &lt; .01). Increased intervention urgency was associated with increased mortality risk: 4.1% no intervention, 6.4% urgent intervention, and 10% emergent intervention.</p>

<p><strong>CONCLUSIONS: </strong>An EHR measure of deterioration with late recognition is associated with increased mortality and length of stay. Mortality risk increased with intervention urgency. Leveraging EHR automation facilitates generalizability, multicenter collaboratives, and metric consistency.</p>

DOI

10.1542/hpeds.2021-006363

Alternate Title

Hosp Pediatr

PMID

35470399

Title

CD19-targeted chimeric antigen receptor T-cell therapy for CNS relapsed or refractory acute lymphocytic leukaemia: a post-hoc analysis of pooled data from five clinical trials.

Year of Publication

2021

Number of Pages

e711-e722

Date Published

2021 Oct

ISSN Number

2352-3026

Abstract

<p><strong>BACKGROUND: </strong>CNS relapse of acute lymphocytic leukaemia is difficult to treat. Durable remissions of relapsed or refractory B-cell acute lymphocytic leukaemia have been observed following treatment with CD19-directed chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells; however, most trials have excluded patients with active CNS disease. We aimed to assess the safety and activity of CAR T-cell therapy in patients with a history of CNS relapsed or refractory B-cell acute lymphocytic leukaemia.</p>

<p><strong>METHODS: </strong>In this post-hoc analysis, we included 195 patients (aged 1-29 years; 110 [56%] male and 85 [44%] female) with relapsed or refractory CD19-positive acute lymphocytic leukaemia or lymphocytic lymphoma from five clinical trials (Pedi CART19, 13BT022, ENSIGN, ELIANA, and 16CT022) done at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (Philadelphia, PA, USA), in which participants received CD19-directed CAR T-cell therapy between April 17, 2012, and April 16, 2019. The trials required control of CNS disease at enrolment and infusion and excluded treatment in the setting of acute neurological toxic effects (&gt;grade 1 in severity) or parenchymal lesions deemed to increase the risk of neurotoxicity. 154 patients from Pedi CART19, ELIANA, ENSIGN, and 16CT022 received tisagenlecleucel and 41 patients from the 13BT022 trial received the humanised CD19-directed CAR, huCART19. We categorised patients into two strata on the basis of CNS status at relapse or within the 12 months preceding CAR T-cell infusion-either CNS-positive or CNS-negative disease. Patients with CNS-positive disease were further divided on the basis of morphological bone marrow involvement-either combined bone marrow and CNS involvement, or isolated CNS involvement. Endpoints were the proportion of patients with complete response at 28 days after infusion, Kaplan-Meier analysis of relapse-free survival and overall survival, and the incidence of cytokine release syndrome and neurotoxicity.</p>

<p><strong>FINDINGS: </strong>Of all 195 patients, 66 (34%) were categorised as having CNS-positive disease and 129 (66%) as having CNS-negative disease, and 43 (22%) were categorised as having isolated CNS involvement. The median length of follow-up was 39 months (IQR 25-49) in the CNS-positive stratum and 36 months (18-49) in the CNS-negative stratum. The proportion of patients in the CNS-positive stratum with a complete response at 28 days after infusion was similar to that in the CNS-negative stratum (64 [97%] of 66 vs 121 [94%] of 129; p=0·74), with no significant difference in relapse-free survival (60% [95% CI 49-74] vs 60% [51-71]; p=0·50) or overall survival (83% [75-93] vs 71% [64-79]; p=0·39) at 2 years between the two groups. Overall survival at 2 years was significantly higher in patients with isolated CNS involvement compared with those with bone marrow involvement (91% [82-100] vs 71% [64-78]; p=0·046). The incidence and severity of neurotoxicity (any grade, 53 [41%] vs 38 [58%]; grade 1, 24 [19%] vs 20 [30%]; grade 2, 14 [11%] vs 10 [15%]; grade 3, 12 [9%] vs 6 [9%], and grade 4, 3 [2%] vs 2 [3%]; p=0·20) and cytokine release syndrome (any grade, 110 [85%] vs 53 [80%]; grade 1, 12 [9%] vs 2 [3%]; grade 2, 61 [47%] vs 38 [58%]; grade 3, 18 [14%] vs 7 [11%] and grade 4, 19 [15%] vs 6 [9%]; p=0·26) did not differ between the CNS-negative and the CNS-positive disease strata.</p>

<p><strong>INTERPRETATION: </strong>Tisagenlecleucel and huCART19 are active at clearing CNS disease and maintaining durable remissions in children and young adults with CNS relapsed or refractory B-cell acute lymphocytic leukaemia or lymphocytic lymphoma, without increasing the risk of severe neurotoxicity; although care should be taken in the timing of therapy and disease control to mitigate this risk. These preliminary findings support the use of these CAR T-cell therapies for patients with CNS relapsed or refractory B-cell acute lymphocytic leukaemia.</p>

<p><strong>FUNDING: </strong>Children's Hospital of Philadelphia Frontier Program.</p>

DOI

10.1016/S2352-3026(21)00238-6

Alternate Title

Lancet Haematol

PMID

34560014

Title

Humanized CD19-Targeted Chimeric Antigen Receptor (CAR) T Cells in CAR-Naive and CAR-Exposed Children and Young Adults With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

Year of Publication

2021

Number of Pages

JCO2003458

Date Published

2021 Jun 22

ISSN Number

1527-7755

Abstract

<p><strong>PURPOSE: </strong>CD19-targeted chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-modified T cells demonstrate unprecedented responses in B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL); however, relapse remains a substantial challenge. Short CAR T-cell persistence contributes to this risk; therefore, strategies to improve persistence are needed.</p>

<p><strong>METHODS: </strong>We conducted a pilot clinical trial of a humanized CD19 CAR T-cell product (huCART19) in children and young adults with relapsed or refractory B-ALL (n = 72) or B-lymphoblastic lymphoma (n = 2), treated in two cohorts: with (retreatment, n = 33) or without (CAR-naive, n = 41) prior CAR exposure. Patients were monitored for toxicity, response, and persistence of huCART19.</p>

<p><strong>RESULTS: </strong>Seventy-four patients 1-29 years of age received huCART19. Cytokine release syndrome developed in 62 (84%) patients and was grade 4 in five (6.8%). Neurologic toxicities were reported in 29 (39%), three (4%) grade 3 or 4, and fully resolved in all cases. The overall response rate at 1 month after infusion was 98% (100% in B-ALL) in the CAR-naive cohort and 64% in the retreatment cohort. At 6 months, the probability of losing huCART19 persistence was 27% (95% CI, 14 to 41) for CAR-naive and 48% (95% CI, 30 to 64) for retreatment patients, whereas the incidence of B-cell recovery was 15% (95% CI, 6 to 28) and 58% (95% CI, 33 to 77), respectively. Relapse-free survival at 12 and 24 months, respectively, was 84% (95% CI, 72 to 97) and 74% (95% CI, 60 to 90) in CAR-naive and 74% (95% CI, 56 to 97) and 58% (95% CI, 37 to 90) in retreatment cohorts.</p>

<p><strong>CONCLUSION: </strong>HuCART19 achieved durable remissions with long-term persistence in children and young adults with relapsed or refractory B-ALL, including after failure of prior CAR T-cell therapy.</p>

DOI

10.1200/JCO.20.03458

Alternate Title

J Clin Oncol

PMID

34156874

Title

Implementation of a Multidisciplinary Debriefing Process for Pediatric Ward Deterioration Events.

Year of Publication

2021

Number of Pages

454-461

Date Published

2021 May

ISSN Number

2154-1671

Abstract

<p><strong>OBJECTIVES: </strong>Event debriefing has established benefit, but its adoption is poorly characterized among pediatric ward providers. To improve patient safety, our hospital restructured its debriefing process for ward deterioration events culminating in ICU transfer. The aim of this study was to describe this process' implementation.</p>

<p><strong>METHODS: </strong>In the restructured process, multidisciplinary ward providers are expected to debrief all ICU transfers. We conducted a multimethod analysis using facilitative guides completed by debriefing participants. Monthly debriefing completion served as an adoption metric.</p>

<p><strong>RESULTS: </strong>Between March 2019 and February 2020, providers across 9 wards performed debriefing for 134 of 312 PICU transfers (43%). Bedside nurses participated most frequently (117 debriefings [87%]). There was no significant difference in debriefing by unit, acuity, season, or nurse staffing. Compared with units fully staffed by rotational frontline clinicians (FLCs; eg, resident physicians), units with dedicated FLCs whose responsibilities are primarily limited to that unit (eg, oncology hospitalists) completed significantly more monthly debriefings (average [SD] 57% [30%] vs 33% [28%] of PICU transfers; = .004). FLC participation was also higher on these units (50% of debriefings [37%] vs 24% [37%]; = .014). Through qualitative analysis, we identified distinct debriefing themes, with teaming activities such as communication cited most often.</p>

<p><strong>CONCLUSIONS: </strong>Implementation of a multidisciplinary debriefing process for ward deterioration events culminating in ICU transfer was associated with differential adoption across providers and FLC staffing models but not acuity or nurse staffing. Teaming activities were a debriefing priority. Future study will assess patient safety outcomes.</p>

DOI

10.1542/hpeds.2020-002014

Alternate Title

Hosp Pediatr

PMID

33858988

Title

Risk-Adapted Preemptive Tocilizumab to Prevent Severe Cytokine Release Syndrome After CTL019 for Pediatric B-Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: A Prospective Clinical Trial.

Year of Publication

2021

Number of Pages

JCO2002477

Date Published

2021 Jan 08

ISSN Number

1527-7755

Abstract

<p><strong>PURPOSE: </strong>To prospectively evaluate the effectiveness of risk-adapted preemptive tocilizumab (PT) administration in preventing severe cytokine release syndrome (CRS) after CTL019, a CD19 chimeric antigen receptor T-cell therapy.</p>

<p><strong>METHODS: </strong>Children and young adults with CD19-positive relapsed or refractory B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia were assigned to high- (≥ 40%) or low- (&lt; 40%) tumor burden cohorts (HTBC or LTBC) based on a bone marrow aspirate or biopsy before infusion. HTBC patients received a single dose of tocilizumab (8-12 mg/kg) after development of high, persistent fevers. LTBC patients received standard CRS management. The primary end point was the frequency of grade 4 CRS (Penn scale), with an observed rate of ≤ 5 of 15 patients in the HTBC pre-defined as clinically meaningful. In post hoc analyses, the HTBC was compared with a historical cohort of high-tumor burden patients from the initial phase I CTL019 trial.</p>

<p><strong>RESULTS: </strong>The primary end point was met. Seventy patients were infused with CTL019, 15 in the HTBC and 55 in the LTBC. All HTBC patients received the PT intervention. The incidence of grade 4 CRS was 27% (95% CI, 8 to 55) in the HTBC and 3.6% (95% CI, 0.4 to 13) in the LTBC. The best overall response rate was 87% in the HTBC and 100% in the LTBC. Initial CTL019 expansion was greater in the HTBC than the LTBC ( &lt; .001), but persistence was not different ( = .73). Event-free and overall survival were worse in the HTBC ( = .004, &lt; .001, respectively). In the post hoc analysis, grade 4 CRS was observed in 27% versus 50% of patients in the PT and prior phase I cohorts, respectively ( = .18).</p>

<p><strong>CONCLUSION: </strong>Risk-adapted PT administration resulted in a decrease in the expected incidence of grade 4 CRS, meeting the study end point, without adversely impacting the antitumor efficacy or safety of CTL019.</p>

DOI

10.1200/JCO.20.02477

Alternate Title

J Clin Oncol

PMID

33417474

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