First name
Beth
Last name
Wathen

Title

Metric Development for the Multicenter Improving Pediatric Sepsis Outcomes (IPSO) Collaborative.

Year of Publication

2021

Date Published

2021 04 01

ISSN Number

1098-4275

Abstract

<p><strong>BACKGROUND: </strong>A 56 US hospital collaborative, Improving Pediatric Sepsis Outcomes, has developed variables, metrics and a data analysis plan to track quality improvement (QI)-based patient outcomes over time. Improving Pediatric Sepsis Outcomes expands on previous pediatric sepsis QI efforts by improving electronic data capture and uniformity across sites.</p>

<p><strong>METHODS: </strong>An expert panel developed metrics and corresponding variables to assess improvements across the care delivery spectrum, including the emergency department, acute care units, hematology and oncology, and the ICU. Outcome, process, and balancing measures were represented. Variables and statistical process control charts were mapped to each metric, elucidating progress over time and informing plan-do-study-act cycles. Electronic health record (EHR) abstraction feasibility was prioritized. Time 0 was defined as time of earliest sepsis recognition (determined electronically), or as a clinically derived time 0 (manually abstracted), identifying earliest physiologic onset of sepsis.</p>

<p><strong>RESULTS: </strong>Twenty-four evidence-based metrics reflected timely and appropriate interventions for a uniformly defined sepsis cohort. Metrics mapped to statistical process control charts with 44 final variables; 40 could be abstracted automatically from multiple EHRs. Variables, including high-risk conditions and bedside huddle time, were challenging to abstract (reported in &lt;80% of encounters). Size or type of hospital, method of data abstraction, and previous QI collaboration participation did not influence hospitals' abilities to contribute data. To date, 90% of data have been submitted, representing 200 007 sepsis episodes.</p>

<p><strong>CONCLUSIONS: </strong>A comprehensive data dictionary was developed for the largest pediatric sepsis QI collaborative, optimizing automation and ensuring sustainable reporting. These approaches can be used in other large-scale sepsis QI projects in which researchers seek to leverage EHR data abstraction.</p>

DOI

10.1542/peds.2020-017889

Alternate Title

Pediatrics

PMID

33795482

Title

Characteristics of Pediatric Rapid Response Systems: Results From a Survey of PRIS Hospitals.

Year of Publication

2021

Date Published

2021 Jan 25

ISSN Number

2154-1671

Abstract

<p><strong>BACKGROUND: </strong>Many hospitals use rapid response systems (RRSs) to identify and intervene on hospitalized children at risk for deterioration.</p>

<p><strong>OBJECTIVES: </strong>To describe RRS characteristics across hospitals in the Pediatric Research in Inpatient Settings (PRIS) network.</p>

<p><strong>METHODS: </strong>We developed the survey through a series of prospective respondent, expert, and cognitive interviews. One institutional expert per PRIS hospital ( = 109) was asked to complete the web survey. We summarized responses using descriptive statistics with a secondary analysis of univariate associations between RRS characteristics and perceived effectiveness.</p>

<p><strong>RESULTS: </strong>The response rate was 72% (79 of 109). Respondents represented diverse hospital types and were primarily physicians (97%) with leadership roles in care escalation. Many hospitals used an early warning score (77%) for identification with variable characteristics (46% automated versus 54% full or partially manual calculation; inputs included vital signs [98%], physical examination findings [88%], diagnoses [23%], medications [19%], and diagnostic tests [14%]). Few incorporated a validated prediction model (9%). Similarly, many RRSs used a rapid response team for intervention (93%) with variable team composition (respiratory therapists [94%], ICU nurses [93%], ICU providers [67%], and pharmacists [27%]). Some used the early warning score to trigger the rapid response team (50%). Only a few staffed a clinician to proactively surveil hospitalized children for risk of deterioration (18%), and these tended to be larger hospitals (annual admissions 12 000 vs 6000, = .007). Most responding experts stated their RRSs improved patient outcomes (92%).</p>

<p><strong>CONCLUSIONS: </strong>RRS characteristics varied across PRIS hospitals.</p>

DOI

10.1542/hpeds.2020-002659

Alternate Title

Hosp Pediatr

PMID

33495251

Title

Development of a Quality Improvement Learning Collaborative to Improve Pediatric Sepsis Outcomes.

Year of Publication

2021

Date Published

2021 Jan

ISSN Number

1098-4275

Abstract

<p>Pediatric sepsis is a major public health problem. Published treatment guidelines and several initiatives have increased adherence with guideline recommendations and have improved patient outcomes, but the gains are modest, and persistent gaps remain. The Children's Hospital Association Improving Pediatric Sepsis Outcomes (IPSO) collaborative seeks to improve sepsis outcomes in pediatric emergency departments, ICUs, general care units, and hematology/oncology units. We developed a multicenter quality improvement learning collaborative of US children's hospitals. We reviewed treatment guidelines and literature through 2 in-person meetings and multiple conference calls. We defined and analyzed baseline sepsis-attributable mortality and hospital-onset sepsis and developed a key driver diagram (KDD) on the basis of treatment guidelines, available evidence, and expert opinion. Fifty-six hospital-based teams are participating in IPSO; 100% of teams are engaged in educational and information-sharing activities. A baseline, sepsis-attributable mortality of 3.1% was determined, and the incidence of hospital-onset sepsis was 1.3 cases per 1000 hospital admissions. A KDD was developed with the aim of reducing both the sepsis-attributable mortality and the incidence of hospital-onset sepsis in children by 25% from baseline by December 2020. To accomplish these aims, the KDD primary drivers focus on improving the following: treatment of infection; recognition, diagnosis, and treatment of sepsis; de-escalation of unnecessary care; engagement of patients and families; and methods to optimize performance. IPSO aims to improve sepsis outcomes through collaborative learning and reliable implementation of evidence-based interventions.</p>

DOI

10.1542/peds.2020-1434

Alternate Title

Pediatrics

PMID

33328337

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