First name
Sarah
Middle name
S
Last name
Milla

Title

Debunking Fringe Beliefs in Child Abuse Imaging: Expert Panel Narrative Review.

Year of Publication

2021

Date Published

2021 Apr 28

ISSN Number

1546-3141

Abstract

<p>Child abuse is a global public health concern. Injuries from physical abuse may be clinically occult and not appreciable on physical examination. Imaging is therefore critical in identifying and documenting such injuries. The radiologic approach to the potentially abused child has received considerable attention and recommendations based on decades of experience and rigorous scientific study. Nonetheless, fringe beliefs describing alternative explanations for child abuse-related injuries have emerged and received mainstream attention. Subsequently, imaging findings identified in abused children have been attributed to poorly supported underlying medical conditions, clouding the evidence basis for radiologic findings indicative of non-accidental trauma. Fringe beliefs that attribute findings seen in child abuse to alternate pathologies such as genetic disorders, birth trauma, metabolic imbalances, vitamin D deficiency, and short falls typically have limited evidence basis and lack professional society support. Careful review of the scientific evidence and professional society consensus statements is important in differentiating findings attributable to child abuse from fringe beliefs used to discount the possibility that a child's constellation of injuries is consistent with abuse. This review refutes fringe beliefs used to provide alternative explanations in cases of suspected child abuse while reinforcing the key literature and scientific consensus regarding child abuse imaging.</p>

DOI

10.2214/AJR.21.25655

Alternate Title

AJR Am J Roentgenol

PMID

33908266

Title

Routine Neuroimaging of the Preterm Brain.

Year of Publication

2020

Date Published

2020 Oct 26

ISSN Number

1098-4275

Abstract

<p>Neuroimaging of the preterm infant is a common assessment performed in the NICU. Timely and focused studies can be used for diagnostic, therapeutic, and prognostic information. However, significant variability exists among neonatal units as to which modalities are used and when imaging studies are obtained. Appropriate timing and selection of neuroimaging studies can help identify neonates with brain injury who may require therapeutic intervention or who may be at risk for neurodevelopmental impairment. This clinical report reviews the different modalities of imaging broadly available to the clinician. Evidence-based indications for each modality, optimal timing of examinations, and prognostic value are discussed.</p>

DOI

10.1542/peds.2020-029082

Alternate Title

Pediatrics

PMID

33106343

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