First name
Lillian
Last name
Sung

Title

Guideline for the Management of Fever and Neutropenia in Pediatric Patients With Cancer and Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation Recipients: 2023 Update.

Year of Publication

2023

Number of Pages

JCO2202224

Date Published

01/2023

ISSN Number

1527-7755

Abstract

PURPOSE: To update a clinical practice guideline (CPG) for the empiric management of fever and neutropenia (FN) in pediatric patients with cancer and hematopoietic cell transplantation recipients.

METHODS: The International Pediatric Fever and Neutropenia Guideline Panel reconvened to conduct the second update of this CPG. We updated the previous systematic review to identify new randomized controlled trials (RCTs) evaluating any strategy for the management of FN in pediatric patients. Using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation framework, evidence quality was classified as high, moderate, low, or very low. The panel updated recommendations related to initial management, ongoing management, and empiric antifungal therapy. Changes from the 2017 CPG were articulated, and good practice statements were considered.

RESULTS: We identified 10 new RCTs in addition to the 69 RCTs identified in previous FN CPGs to inform the 2023 FN CPG. Changes from the 2017 CPG included two conditional recommendations regarding (1) discontinuation of empiric antibacterial therapy in clinically well and afebrile patients with low-risk FN if blood cultures remain negative at 48 hours despite no evidence of marrow recovery and (2) pre-emptive antifungal therapy for invasive fungal disease in high-risk patients not receiving antimold prophylaxis. The panel created a good practice statement to initiate FN CPG-consistent empiric antibacterial therapy as soon as possible in clinically unstable febrile patients.

CONCLUSION: The updated FN CPG incorporates important modifications on the basis of recently published trials. Future work should focus on addressing knowledge gaps, improving CPG implementation, and measuring the impact of CPG-consistent care.

DOI

10.1200/JCO.22.02224

Alternate Title

J Clin Oncol

PMID

36689694

Title

Prospective Evaluation of the Fungitell® (1→3) Beta-D-Glucan Assay as a Diagnostic Tool for Invasive Fungal Disease in Pediatric Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation: A Report from the Children's Oncology Group.

Year of Publication

2023

Number of Pages

e14399

Date Published

02/2023

ISSN Number

1399-3046

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Invasive fungal disease (IFD) is a major source of morbidity and mortality for hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT) recipients. Non-invasive biomarkers, such as the beta-D-glucan assay, may improve the diagnosis of IFD. The objective was to define the utility of surveillance testing using Fungitell® beta-D-glucan (BDG) assay in children receiving antifungal prophylaxis in the immediate post-HCT period.

METHODS: Weekly surveillance blood testing with the Fungitell® BDG assay was performed during the early post-HCT period in the context of a randomized trial of children, adolescents, and young adults undergoing allogeneic HCT allocated to triazole or caspofungin prophylaxis. Positivity was defined at the manufacturer cutoff of 80 pg/ml. IFD was adjudicated using blinded central reviewers. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value (NPV) were calculated for the Fungitell® BDG assay for the outcome of proven or probable IFD.

RESULTS: A total of 51 patients (out of 290 patients in the parent trial) contributed blood specimens. In total, 278 specimens were evaluated. Specificity was 80.8% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 75.6%-85.3%), and NPV was over 99% (95% CI: 86.8%-99.9%). However, there were no true positive results, resulting in sensitivity of 0% (95% CI: 0.0%-84.2%) and PPV of 0% (95% CI: 0.0%-6.7%).

CONCLUSIONS: Fungitell® BDG screening is of limited utility in diagnosing IFD in the post-HCT period, mainly due to high false-positive rates. Fungitell® BDG surveillance testing should not be performed in children during the early post-HCT period while receiving antifungal prophylaxis as the pretest probability for IFD is low.

DOI

10.1111/petr.14399

Alternate Title

Pediatr Transplant

PMID

36299233

Title

Prospective Evaluation of Galactomannan and (1→3) β-d-Glucan Assays as Diagnostic Tools for Invasive Fungal Disease in Children, Adolescents, and Young Adults With Acute Myeloid Leukemia Receiving Fungal Prophylaxis.

Year of Publication

2021

Date Published

2021 Jun 26

ISSN Number

2048-7207

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Patients receiving chemotherapy for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) are at high risk for invasive fungal disease (IFD). Diagnosis of IFD is challenging, leading to interest in fungal biomarkers. The objective was to define the utility of surveillance testing with Platelia Aspergillus galactomannan (GM) enzyme immunoassay (EIA) and Fungitell β-d-glucan (BDG) assay in children with AML receiving antifungal prophylaxis.

METHODS: Twice-weekly surveillance blood testing with GM EIA and BDG assay was performed during periods of neutropenia in the context of a randomized trial of children, adolescents, and young adults with AML allocated to fluconazole or caspofungin prophylaxis. Proven or probable IFD was adjudicated using blinded central reviewers. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value (NPV) were calculated for Platelia and Fungitell assays alone and in combination for the outcomes of proven and probable invasive aspergillosis (IA) or invasive candidiasis (IC).

RESULTS: Among 471 patients enrolled, 425 participants (209 fluconazole and 216 caspofungin) contributed ≥1 blood specimen. In total, 6103 specimens were evaluated, with a median of 15 specimens per patient (range 1-43). The NPV was >99% for GM EIA and BDG assay alone and in combination. However, there were no true positive results, resulting in sensitivity and PPV for each assay of 0%.

CONCLUSIONS: The GM EIA and the BDG assay alone or in combination were not successful at detecting IA or IC during periods of neutropenia in children, adolescents, and young adults with AML receiving antifungal prophylaxis. Utilization of these assays for surveillance in this clinical setting should be discouraged.

DOI

10.1093/jpids/piab036

Alternate Title

J Pediatric Infect Dis Soc

PMID

34173659

Title

CD123 Expression Is Associated With High-Risk Disease Characteristics in Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia: A Report From the Children's Oncology Group.

Year of Publication

2021

Number of Pages

JCO2101595

Date Published

2021 Dec 02

ISSN Number

1527-7755

Abstract

<p><strong>PURPOSE: </strong>Increased CD123 surface expression has been associated with high-risk disease characteristics in adult acute myeloid leukemia (AML), but has not been well-characterized in childhood AML. In this study, we defined CD123 expression and associated clinical characteristics in a uniformly treated cohort of pediatric patients with newly diagnosed AML enrolled on the Children's Oncology Group AAML1031 phase III trial (NCT01371981).</p>

<p><strong>MATERIALS AND METHODS: </strong>AML blasts within diagnostic bone marrow specimens (n = 1,040) were prospectively analyzed for CD123 protein expression by multidimensional flow cytometry immunophenotyping at a central clinical laboratory. Patients were stratified as low-risk or high-risk on the basis of (1) leukemia-associated cytogenetic and molecular alterations and (2) end-of-induction measurable residual disease levels.</p>

<p><strong>RESULTS: </strong>The study population was divided into CD123 expression-based quartiles (n = 260 each) for analysis. Those with highest CD123 expression (quartile 4 [Q4]) had higher prevalence of high-risk rearrangements and -ITD mutations ( &lt; .001 for both) and lower prevalence of low-risk t(8;21), inv(16), and mutations ( &lt; .001 for all). Patients in lower CD123 expression quartiles (Q1-3) had similar relapse risk, event-free survival, and overall survival. Conversely, Q4 patients had a significantly higher relapse risk (53% 39%, &lt; .001), lower event-free survival (49% 69%, &lt; .001), and lower overall survival (32% 50%, &lt; .001) in comparison with Q1-3 patients. CD123 maintained independent significance for outcomes when all known contemporary high-risk cytogenetic and molecular markers were incorporated into multivariable Cox regression analysis.</p>

<p><strong>CONCLUSION: </strong>CD123 is strongly associated with disease-relevant cytogenetic and molecular alterations in childhood AML. CD123 is a critical biomarker and promising immunotherapeutic target for children with relapsed or refractory AML, given its prevalent expression and enrichment in patients with high-risk genetic alterations and inferior clinical outcomes with conventional therapy.</p>

DOI

10.1200/JCO.21.01595

Alternate Title

J Clin Oncol

PMID

34855461

Title

Outcomes of intensification of induction chemotherapy for children with high-risk acute myeloid leukemia: A report from the Children's Oncology Group.

Year of Publication

2021

Number of Pages

e29281

Date Published

2021 Oct 01

ISSN Number

1545-5017

Abstract

<p><strong>BACKGROUND: </strong>High-risk pediatric acute myeloid leukemia confers a poor prognosis, and alternative strategies are needed to improve outcomes. We hypothesized that intensifying induction on the AAML1031 clinical trial would improve outcomes compared to the predecessor trial AAML0531.</p>

<p><strong>METHODS: </strong>Patients on AAML0531 received cytarabine (1600&nbsp;mg/m )/daunorubicin (150&nbsp;mg/m )/etoposide (ADE) for induction II and patients on AAML1031 received mitoxantrone (48&nbsp;mg/m )/cytarabine (8000&nbsp;mg/m ) (MA). Stem cell transplant (SCT) conditioning included busulfan/cyclophosphamide on AAML0531, whereas AAML1031 used busulfan/fludarabine and liberalized donor eligibility. Patients were included in this analysis if they met high-risk criteria common to the two trials by cytogenics or poor disease response after induction I ADE.</p>

<p><strong>RESULTS: </strong>MA provided no benefit over ADE at: induction II response (complete response [CR]: 64% vs. 62%, p&nbsp;=&nbsp;.87; measurable residual disease [MRD]+: 57% vs. 46%, p&nbsp;=&nbsp;.34); or intensification I response (CR: 79% vs. 94%, p&nbsp;=&nbsp;.27; MRD+: 27% vs. 20%, p&nbsp;=&nbsp;1.0). When considered with altered SCT approach, MA did not improve 5-year disease-free survival (24% ± 9% vs. 18% ± 15%, p&nbsp;=&nbsp;.63) or 5-year overall survival (35% ± 10% vs. 38% ± 18%, p&nbsp;=&nbsp;.66). MA was associated with slower neutrophil recovery (median 34 vs. 27&nbsp;days, p&nbsp;=&nbsp;.007) and platelet recovery (median 29 vs. 24.5&nbsp;days, p&nbsp;=&nbsp;.04) and longer hospital stay (32 vs. 28&nbsp;days, p&nbsp;=&nbsp;.01) during induction II.</p>

<p><strong>CONCLUSION: </strong>Intensification of induction II did not improve treatment response or survival, but did increase toxicity and resource utilization. Alternative strategies are urgently needed to improve outcomes for pediatric patients with high-risk acute myeloid leukemia (trials registered at clinicaltrials.gov NCT01371981, NCT00372593).</p>

DOI

10.1002/pbc.29281

Alternate Title

Pediatr Blood Cancer

PMID

34596937

Title

Facilitators and barriers to clinical practice guideline-consistent supportive care at pediatric oncology institutions: a Children's Oncology Group study.

Year of Publication

2021

Number of Pages

106

Date Published

2021 Sep 16

ISSN Number

2662-2211

Abstract

<p><strong>BACKGROUND: </strong>Clinical practice guideline (CPG)-consistent care improves patient outcomes, but CPG implementation is poor. Little is known about CPG implementation in pediatric oncology. This study aimed to understand supportive care CPG implementation facilitators and barriers at pediatric oncology National Cancer Institute (NCI) Community Oncology Research Program (NCORP) institutions.</p>

<p><strong>METHODS: </strong>Healthcare professionals at 26 pediatric, Children's&nbsp;Oncology&nbsp;Group-member, NCORP institutions were invited to participate in face-to-face focus groups. Serial focus groups were held until saturation of ideas was reached. Supportive care CPG implementation facilitators and barriers were solicited using nominal group technique (NGT), and implementation of specific supportive care CPG recommendations was discussed. Notes from each focus group were analyzed using a directed content analysis. The top five themes arising from an analysis of NGT items were identified, first from each focus group and then across all focus groups.</p>

<p><strong>RESULTS: </strong>Saturation of ideas was reached after seven focus groups involving 35 participants from 18 institutions. The top five facilitators of CPG implementation identified across all focus groups were organizational factors including charging teams with CPG implementation, individual factors including willingness to standardize care, user needs and values including mentorship, system factors including implementation structure, and implementation strategies including a basis in science. The top five barriers of CPG implementation identified were organizational factors including tolerance for inconsistencies, individual factors including lack of trust, system factors including administrative hurdles, user needs and values including lack of inclusivity, and professional including knowledge gaps.</p>

<p><strong>CONCLUSIONS: </strong>Healthcare professionals at pediatric NCORP institutions believe that organizational factors are the most important determinants of supportive care CPG implementation. They believe that CPG-consistent supportive care is most likely to be delivered in organizations that prioritize evidence-based care, provide structure and resources to implement CPGs, and eliminate implementation barriers.</p>

<p><strong>TRIAL REGISTRATION: </strong>ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02847130. Date of registration: July 28, 2016.</p>

DOI

10.1186/s43058-021-00200-2

Alternate Title

Implement Sci Commun

PMID

34530933

Title

Cytarabine dose reduction in patients with low-risk acute myeloid leukemia: A report from the Children's Oncology Group.

Year of Publication

2021

Number of Pages

e29313

Date Published

2021 Sep 02

ISSN Number

1545-5017

Abstract

<p><strong>BACKGROUND: </strong>The optimal number of chemotherapy courses for low-risk (LR) pediatric acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is not known.</p>

<p><strong>OBJECTIVE: </strong>To compare outcomes for four (21.6&nbsp;g/m cytarabine) versus five (45.6&nbsp;g/m cytarabine) chemotherapy courses for LR-AML using data from Children's Oncology Group (COG) AAML0531 and AAML1031.</p>

<p><strong>METHODS: </strong>We compared relapse risk (RR), disease-free survival (DFS), and overall survival (OS), and the differential impact in LR subgroups for patients receiving four versus five chemotherapy courses. Cox (OS and DFS) and risk (RR) regressions were used to estimate hazard ratios (HR) to compare outcomes.</p>

<p><strong>RESULTS: </strong>A total of 923 LR-AML patients were included; 21% received five courses. Overall, LR-AML patients who received four courses had higher RR (40.9% vs. 31.4%; HR&nbsp;=&nbsp;1.40, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.06-1.85), and worse DFS (56.0% vs. 67.0%; HR&nbsp;=&nbsp;1.45, 95% CI: 1.10-1.91). There was a similar decrement in OS though it was not statistically significant (77.0% vs. 83.5%; HR&nbsp;=&nbsp;1.45, 95% CI: 0.97-2.17). Stratified analyses revealed the detrimental effects of cytarabine dose de-escalation to be most pronounced in the LR-AML subgroup with uninformative cytogenetic/molecular features who were minimal residual disease (MRD) negative after the first induction course (EOI1). The absolute decrease in DFS with four courses for patients with favorable cytogenetic/molecular features and positive MRD was similar to that observed for patients with uninformative cytogenetic/molecular features and negative MRD at EOI1, though not statistically significant.</p>

<p><strong>CONCLUSIONS: </strong>Our results support de-escalation of cytarabine exposure through the elimination of a fifth chemotherapy course only for LR-AML patients who have both favorable cytogenetic/molecular features and negative MRD after the first induction cycle.</p>

DOI

10.1002/pbc.29313

Alternate Title

Pediatr Blood Cancer

PMID

34472213

Title

Comparative Effectiveness of Echinocandins vs Triazoles or Amphotericin B Formulations as Initial Directed Therapy for Invasive Candidiasis in Children and Adolescents.

Year of Publication

2021

Date Published

2021 Aug 10

ISSN Number

2048-7207

Abstract

<p><strong>BACKGROUND: </strong>Invasive candidiasis is the most common invasive fungal disease in children and adolescents, but there are limited pediatric-specific antifungal effectiveness data. We compared the effectiveness of echinocandins to triazoles or amphotericin B formulations (triazole/amphotericin B) as initial directed therapy for invasive candidiasis.</p>

<p><strong>METHODS: </strong>This multinational observational cohort study enrolled patients aged &gt;120 days and &lt;18 years with proven invasive candidiasis from January 1, 2014, to November 28, 2017, at 43 International Pediatric Fungal Network sites. Primary exposure was initial directed therapy administered at the time qualifying culture became positive for yeast. Exposure groups were categorized by receipt of an echinocandin vs receipt of triazole/amphotericin B. Primary outcome was global response at 14 days following invasive candidiasis onset, adjudicated by a centralized data review committee. Stratified Mantel-Haenszel analyses estimated risk difference between exposure groups.</p>

<p><strong>RESULTS: </strong>Seven-hundred and fifty invasive candidiasis episodes were identified. After exclusions, 541 participants (235 in the echinocandin group and 306 in the triazole/amphotericin B group) remained. Crude failure rates at 14 days for echinocandin and triazole/amphotericin B groups were 9.8% (95% confidence intervals [CI]: 6.0% to 13.6%) and 13.1% (95% CI: 9.3% to 16.8%), respectively. The adjusted 14-day risk difference between echinocandin and triazole/amphotericin B groups was -7.1% points (95% CI: -13.1% to -2.4%), favoring echinocandins. The risk difference was -0.4% (95% CI: -7.5% to 6.7%) at 30 days.</p>

<p><strong>CONCLUSIONS: </strong>In children with invasive candidiasis, initial directed therapy with an echinocandin was associated with reduced failure rate at 14 days but not 30 days. These results may support echinocandins as initial directed therapy for invasive candidiasis in children and adolescents.</p>

<p><strong>CLINICAL TRIALS REGISTRATION: </strong>NCT01869829.</p>

DOI

10.1093/jpids/piab024

Alternate Title

J Pediatric Infect Dis Soc

PMID

34374424

Title

Musculoskeletal impairments in children receiving intensive therapy for acute leukemia or undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplant: A report from the Children's Oncology Group.

Year of Publication

2021

Number of Pages

e29053

Date Published

2021 Apr 23

ISSN Number

1545-5017

Abstract

<p><strong>BACKGROUND: </strong>Children receiving intensive chemotherapy for leukemia or undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) for solid tumors or leukemia are at risk for musculoskeletal (MSK) impairment from their underlying disease and from treatment. Data are limited on the incidence and nature of these disorders during intensive therapy. This study's objective was to provide a cross-sectional description of MSK impairments in this population.</p>

<p><strong>PROCEDURE: </strong>Children with acute myeloid leukemia (AML), relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukemia (rALL), or undergoing HSCT were systematically assessed for MSK impairments as part of Children's Oncology Group study ACCL0934. Assessments occurred at study entry, at 2&nbsp;months, and at 12&nbsp;months and included evaluation for signs or symptoms of MSK impairment and the type, site, and diagnosis.</p>

<p><strong>RESULTS: </strong>Six hundred three patients were included. MSK signs or symptoms were present in 48 (8.0%) children at study entry, 64 (13.5%) children at 2&nbsp;months, and 40 (11.6%) children at 12&nbsp;months. Arthralgia and/or gait abnormalities were the most common impairments; the knee was the most common site. Arthritis and tendonitis were both rare. Vincristine neuropathy, MSK impacts from central nervous system pathology, and bone or joint pain from underlying cancer were the most common diagnoses. Multivariate analysis demonstrated that having rALL (odds ratio [OR] 2.00, 95% CI 1.07-3.76, p&nbsp;=&nbsp;.03) or obesity (OR 2.10, 95% CI 1.12-3.95, p&nbsp;=&nbsp;.02) were risk factors for MSK impairment at study entry.</p>

<p><strong>CONCLUSIONS: </strong>MSK impairments are common in this intensively treated patient population, especially in those with rALL and those who are obese.</p>

DOI

10.1002/pbc.29053

Alternate Title

Pediatr Blood Cancer

PMID

33890409

Title

Acute erythroid leukemia is enriched in NUP98 fusions: a report from the Children's Oncology Group.

Year of Publication

2020

Number of Pages

6000-6008

Date Published

2020 Dec 08

ISSN Number

2473-9537

Abstract

<p>Acute erythroid leukemia (AEL) is a rare subtype of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) primarily affecting older adults and was previously classified into erythroid/myeloid and pure erythroid subtypes. In this pediatric AEL study, we evaluated morphologic, immunophenotypic, cytogenetic, molecular, and clinical data of 24 (1.2%) cases from all cases undergoing central pathology review in Children's Oncology Group trials AAML0531 and AAML1031. Of 24 cases, 5 had a pure erythroid phenotype, and 19 had an erythroid/myeloid phenotype. NUP98 fusions were highly enriched in patients with AEL, occurring in 7 of 22 cases for which molecular data were available (31.8% vs 6.7% in other AML subtypes). Of 5 cases of pure erythroid leukemias (PELs), 3 had NUP98 fusions, and 4 had complex karyotypes. Erythroid/myeloid leukemias were reclassified by using the 2017 World Health Organization hematopathology classification as: myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) with excess blasts-1 (n = 3), MDS with excess blasts-2 (n = 7), AML (nonerythroid, n = 5), and unknown MDS/AML (n = 4); the 5 cases of nonerythroid AML included 1 with an NUP98-NSD1 fusion, 2 with myelodysplasia-related changes, and 1 with a complex karyotype. Three cases of MDS with excess blasts-2 also had NUP98 rearrangements. WT1 mutations were present in 5 of 14 cases, all erythroid/myeloid leukemia. Outcomes assessment revealed statistically poorer overall survival (5-year, 20% ± 36% vs 66% ± 23%; P = .004) and event-free survival (5-year, 20% ± 36% vs 46% ± 23%; P = .019) for those with PEL than those with erythroid/myeloid leukemia. Our study supports that AEL is a morphologically and genetically heterogeneous entity that is enriched in NUP98 fusions, with the pure erythroid subtype associated with particularly adverse outcomes.</p>

DOI

10.1182/bloodadvances.2020002712

Alternate Title

Blood Adv

PMID

33284945

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