First name
Mayur
Middle name
M
Last name
Desai

Title

Parental immigration status is associated with children's health care utilization: findings from the 2003 new immigrant survey of US legal permanent residents.

Year of Publication

2013

Number of Pages

1913-21

Date Published

2013 Dec

ISSN Number

1573-6628

Abstract

<p>Our objective was to examine the association between parental immigration status and child health and health care utilization. Using data from a national sample of immigrant adults who had recently become legal permanent residents (LPR), children (n = 2,170) were categorized according to their parents' immigration status prior to LPR: legalized, mixed-status, refugee, temporary resident, or undocumented. Logistic regression with generalized estimating equations was used to compare child health and health care utilization by parental immigration status over the prior 12 months. Nearly all children in the sample were reported to be in good to excellent health. Children whose parents had been undocumented were least likely to have had an illness that was reported to have required medical attention (5.4 %). Children whose parents had been either undocumented or temporary residents were most likely to have a delayed preventive annual exam (18.2 and 18.7 %, respectively). Delayed dental care was most common among children whose parents had come to the US as refugees (29.1 %). Differences in the preventive annual exam remained significant after adjusting for socioeconomic characteristics. Parental immigration status before LPR was not associated with large differences in reported child health status. Parental immigration status before LPR was associated with the use of preventive annual exams and dental services. However, no group of children was consistently disadvantaged with respect to all measures.</p>

DOI

10.1007/s10995-012-1217-2

Alternate Title

Matern Child Health J

PMID

23329165

Title

Prevalence of chronic disease and insurance coverage among refugees in the United States.

Year of Publication

2012

Number of Pages

933-40

Date Published

2012 Dec

ISSN Number

1557-1920

Abstract

<p>Little is known about the health status of refugees beyond the immediate post-arrival period in the US. Using data from the 2003 New Immigrant Survey, a nationally representative survey of immigrants who had recently become legal permanent residents, we determined the prevalence of chronic conditions and health insurance coverage among adult refugees who had lived in the US for at least 1 year (n = 490). We compared their health status with that of other immigrants (n = 3,715) using multivariable logistic regression. The median duration of US residency was 5.6 and 8.0 years among refugees and other immigrants, respectively. Refugees were more likely than other immigrants to report at least one chronic condition (24.7 vs. 15.6 %, P &lt; 0.001). After adjusting for sociodemographic differences, the odds of the following conditions remained significantly higher among refugees: arthritis (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 1.67, 95 % confidence interval [CI] = 1.07, 2.61), heart disease (AOR = 2.49, 95 % CI = 1.30, 4.74), stroke (AOR = 5.87, 95 % CI = 1.27, 27.25), activity-limitation due to pain (AOR = 1.96, 95 % CI = 1.31, 2.93), and any chronic condition (AOR = 1.37, 95 % CI = 1.03, 1.81). Although similar percentages of refugees (49.0 %) and other immigrants (47.4 %) were uninsured, 46.5 % of refugees with chronic conditions lacked health insurance. Refugees have a high burden of chronic disease and would benefit from expanded insurance coverage for adults with preexisting conditions.</p>

DOI

10.1007/s10903-012-9618-2

Alternate Title

J Immigr Minor Health

PMID

22527741

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