First name
Carol
Middle name
A
Last name
Wallace

Title

The Childhood Arthritis & Rheumatology Research Alliance Consensus Treatment Plans: Towards Comparative Effectiveness in the Pediatric Rheumatic Diseases.

Year of Publication

2018

Date Published

2018 Jan 15

ISSN Number

2326-5205

Abstract

<p>The pediatric rheumatic diseases are a heterogeneous group of rare diseases, posing a number of challenges for the use of traditional clinical and translational research approaches. Innovative comparative effectiveness approaches are needed to efficiently study treatment approaches and disease outcomes. The Childhood Arthritis and Rheumatology Research Alliance (CARRA) developed the consensus treatment plan (CTP) approach as a comparative effectiveness tool for research in pediatric rheumatology. CTPs are treatment strategies, developed by consensus methods among CARRA members, intended to reduce variation in treatment approaches, standardize outcome measurements, and allow for comparison of the effectiveness of different approaches with the goal of improving disease outcomes. To date, CTPs have been published for 7 different diseases and disease manifestations. The approach has been successfully piloted for juvenile localized scleroderma, systemic onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), polyarticular JIA, dermatomyositis, and lupus nephritis. Large-scale studies are underway for systemic JIA and polyarticular JIA, with the CARRA patient registry serving as the data collection platform. These studies have been designed with stakeholder involvement, including active input from CARRA providers, patients, and parents, with the goal of increasing the feasibility and ensuring the relevance of the outcomes. These studies include ancillary biospecimen collection intended to support additional translational and mechanistic studies. Data from these ongoing CTP studies will provide more information on the ability of this approach to identify effective treatment strategies and improve outcomes for the pediatric rheumatic diseases. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.</p>

DOI

10.1002/art.40395

PMID

29333701

Title

Consensus treatment plans for new-onset systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

Year of Publication

2012

Number of Pages

1001-10

Date Published

2012 Jul

ISSN Number

2151-4658

Abstract

<p><strong>OBJECTIVE: </strong>There is wide variation in therapeutic approaches to systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) among North American rheumatologists. Understanding the comparative effectiveness of the diverse therapeutic options available for treatment of systemic JIA can result in better health outcomes. The Childhood Arthritis and Rheumatology Research Alliance (CARRA) developed consensus treatment plans and standardized assessment schedules for use in clinical practice to facilitate such studies.</p>

<p><strong>METHODS: </strong>Case-based surveys were administered to CARRA members to identify prevailing treatments for new-onset systemic JIA. A 2-day consensus conference in April 2010 employed modified nominal group technique to formulate preliminary treatment plans and determine important data elements for collection. Followup surveys were employed to refine the plans and assess clinical acceptability.</p>

<p><strong>RESULTS: </strong>The initial case-based survey identified significant variability among current treatment approaches for new-onset systemic JIA, underscoring the utility of standardized plans to evaluate comparative effectiveness. We developed 4 consensus treatment plans for the first 9 months of therapy, as well as case definitions and clinical and laboratory monitoring schedules. The 4 treatment regimens included glucocorticoids only, or therapy with methotrexate, anakinra, or tocilizumab, with or without glucocorticoids. This approach was approved by &gt;78% of the CARRA membership.</p>

<p><strong>CONCLUSION: </strong>Four standardized treatment plans were developed for new-onset systemic JIA. Coupled with data collection at defined intervals, use of these treatment plans will create the opportunity to evaluate comparative effectiveness in an observational setting to optimize initial management of systemic JIA.</p>

DOI

10.1002/acr.21625

Alternate Title

Arthritis Care Res (Hoboken)

PMID

22290637

Title

Development and retrospective validation of the juvenile spondyloarthritis disease activity index.

Year of Publication

2014

Number of Pages

1775-82

Date Published

2014 Dec

ISSN Number

2151-4658

Abstract

<p><strong>OBJECTIVE: </strong>To develop and validate the Juvenile Spondyloarthritis Disease Activity Index (JSpADA) for use in clinical practice and research.</p>

<p><strong>METHODS: </strong>Using modified Delphi consensus techniques, 10 items were selected by participants in the international pediatric rheumatology listserv, the Childhood Arthritis and Rheumatology Research Alliance, and the listserv for the pediatric section of the American College of Rheumatology. Validation was performed in a retrospective multicenter cohort of 244 children.</p>

<p><strong>RESULTS: </strong>In total, 106 physicians representing 14 countries completed the initial questionnaire. Completion rates for the subsequent questionnaires were 84%, 75%, and 77% of the original respondents. Ten items exceeded 80% consensus: arthritis, enthesitis, patient pain assessment, inflammatory markers, morning stiffness, clinical sacroiliitis, uveitis, back mobility, and patient and physician assessments of disease activity. After item analysis, 2 items were eliminated (patient and physician assessments of disease activity). Factor analysis identified 3 primary domains that explained 58% of the variance: peripheral disease, axial disease, and uveitis. The Cronbach's α coefficient was 0.66. The JSpADA had high or moderate correlations with the Juvenile Arthritis Disease Activity Score (r = 0.81), patient and physician assessments of disease activity (r = 0.70 and r = 0.66, respectively), and the Childhood Health Assessment Questionnaire (r = 0.56). The JSpADA discriminated well between subjects with active versus inactive disease (P &lt; 0.001) and was responsive to improvement or worsening in disease activity over time (P &lt; 0.001).</p>

<p><strong>CONCLUSION: </strong>Using international input and consensus formation techniques, we developed and validated the first disease activity assessment for juvenile spondyloarthritis. Future studies should validate the JSpADA in a prospective multicenter cohort.</p>

DOI

10.1002/acr.22411

Alternate Title

Arthritis Care Res (Hoboken)

PMID

25047959

WATCH THIS PAGE

Subscription is not available for this page.