First name
Mark
Middle name
M
Last name
Mitsnefes

Title

A review of ferric citrate clinical studies, and the rationale and design of the Ferric Citrate and Chronic Kidney Disease in Children (FIT4KiD) trial.

Year of Publication

2022

Date Published

2022 Mar 02

ISSN Number

1432-198X

Abstract

<p>Pediatric chronic kidney disease (CKD) is characterized by many co-morbidities, including impaired growth and development, CKD-mineral and bone disorder, anemia, dysregulated iron metabolism, and cardiovascular disease. In pediatric CKD cohorts, higher circulating concentrations of fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) are associated with some of these adverse clinical outcomes, including CKD progression and left ventricular hypertrophy. It is hypothesized that lowering FGF23 levels will reduce the risk of these events and improve clinical outcomes. Reducing FGF23 levels in CKD may be accomplished by targeting two key stimuli of FGF23 production-dietary phosphate absorption and iron deficiency. Ferric citrate is approved for use as an enteral phosphate binder and iron replacement product in adults with CKD. Clinical trials in adult CKD cohorts have also demonstrated that ferric citrate decreases circulating FGF23 concentrations. This review outlines the possible deleterious effects of excess FGF23 in CKD, summarizes data from the adult CKD clinical trials of ferric citrate, and presents the Ferric Citrate and Chronic Kidney Disease in Children (FIT4KiD) study, a randomized, placebo-controlled trial to evaluate the effects of ferric citrate on FGF23 in pediatric patients with CKD stages 3-4 (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier NCT04741646).</p>

DOI

10.1007/s00467-022-05492-7

Alternate Title

Pediatr Nephrol

PMID

35237863

Title

Using Electronic Health Record Data to Rapidly Identify Children with Glomerular Disease for Clinical Research.

Year of Publication

2019

Number of Pages

2427-2435

Date Published

2019 Dec

ISSN Number

1533-3450

Abstract

<p><strong>BACKGROUND: </strong>The rarity of pediatric glomerular disease makes it difficult to identify sufficient numbers of participants for clinical trials. This leaves limited data to guide improvements in care for these patients.</p>

<p><strong>METHODS: </strong>The authors developed and tested an electronic health record (EHR) algorithm to identify children with glomerular disease. We used EHR data from 231 patients with glomerular disorders at a single center to develop a computerized algorithm comprising diagnosis, kidney biopsy, and transplant procedure codes. The algorithm was tested using PEDSnet, a national network of eight children's hospitals with data on &gt;6.5 million children. Patients with three or more nephrologist encounters (=55,560) not meeting the computable phenotype definition of glomerular disease were defined as nonglomerular cases. A reviewer blinded to case status used a standardized form to review random samples of cases (=800) and nonglomerular cases (=798).</p>

<p><strong>RESULTS: </strong>The final algorithm consisted of two or more diagnosis codes from a qualifying list or one diagnosis code and a pretransplant biopsy. Performance characteristics among the population with three or more nephrology encounters were sensitivity, 96% (95% CI, 94% to 97%); specificity, 93% (95% CI, 91% to 94%); positive predictive value (PPV), 89% (95% CI, 86% to 91%); negative predictive value, 97% (95% CI, 96% to 98%); and area under the receiver operating characteristics curve, 94% (95% CI, 93% to 95%). Requiring that the sum of nephrotic syndrome diagnosis codes exceed that of glomerulonephritis codes identified children with nephrotic syndrome or biopsy-based minimal change nephropathy, FSGS, or membranous nephropathy, with 94% sensitivity and 92% PPV. The algorithm identified 6657 children with glomerular disease across PEDSnet, ≥50% of whom were seen within 18 months.</p>

<p><strong>CONCLUSIONS: </strong>The authors developed an EHR-based algorithm and demonstrated that it had excellent classification accuracy across PEDSnet. This tool may enable faster identification of cohorts of pediatric patients with glomerular disease for observational or prospective studies.</p>

DOI

10.1681/ASN.2019040365

Alternate Title

J. Am. Soc. Nephrol.

PMID

31732612

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