First name
Rebecca
Middle name
P
Last name
Thomas

Title

Person Ability Scores as an Alternative to Norm-Referenced Scores as Outcome Measures in Studies of Neurodevelopmental Disorders.

Year of Publication

2020

Number of Pages

475-480

Date Published

2020 11 01

ISSN Number

1944-7558

Abstract

<p>Although norm-referenced scores are essential to the identification of disability, they possess several features which affect their sensitivity to change. Norm-referenced scores often decrease over time among people with neurodevelopmental disorders who exhibit slower-than-average increases in ability. Further, the reliability of norm-referenced scores is lower at the tails of the distribution, resulting in floor effects and increased measurement error for people with neurodevelopmental disorders. In contrast, the person ability scores generated during the process of constructing a standardized test with item response theory are designed to assess change. We illustrate these limitations of norm-referenced scores, and relative advantages of ability scores, using data from studies of autism spectrum disorder and creatine transporter deficiency.</p>

DOI

10.1352/1944-7558-125.6.475

Alternate Title

Am J Intellect Dev Disabil

PMID

33211814

Title

Early Indicators of Creatine Transporter Deficiency.

Year of Publication

2019

Number of Pages

283-285

Date Published

2019 Mar

ISSN Number

1097-6833

Abstract

<p>Early identification is a goal for creatine transporter deficiency and will be critical for future treatment. Before their first birthday, one-half of this sample showed both a significant feeding/weight gain issue and delayed sitting or crawling. Combined, these early indicators could have alerted providers to conduct a urine screen.</p>

DOI

10.1016/j.jpeds.2018.11.008

Alternate Title

J. Pediatr.

PMID

30579583

Title

What's in a name? A preliminary event-related potential study of response to name in preschool children with and without autism spectrum disorder.

Year of Publication

2019

Number of Pages

e0216051

Date Published

2019

ISSN Number

1932-6203

Abstract

<p>The ability to selectively respond to one's own name is important for social and language development, and is disrupted in atypically developing populations (e.g., autism spectrum disorder). Research with typically developing samples using event-related potentials (ERPs) has demonstrated that the subject's own name (SON) is differentiated from other stimuli at both early sensory and later cognitive stages of auditory processing. While neural indices of response to name have been researched extensively in adults, no such studies have been conducted with typically developing preschool children or children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The present study investigated ERP response to name in a sample of typically developing (TD) preschoolers (n = 19; mean age = 4.3 years) as well as a small, exploratory comparison group of preschoolers with ASD (n = 13; mean age = 4.4 years). TD preschoolers exhibited significantly greater negativity to SON over frontal regions than to an unfamiliar nonsense name, consistent with the adult SON negativity component. This component was present whether the name was spoken by a parent or an unfamiliar adult, suggesting that it reflects SON-specific processing rather than broad self-relevant information processing. Comparing preschoolers with ASD to the TD children revealed a significant SON negativity component across both groups. The amplitude of the SON negativity response was significantly correlated with social variables in the ASD group, though these correlations did not survive correction for multiple comparisons. This study is the first to demonstrate the presence of the SON component in preschool children with and without ASD.</p>

DOI

10.1371/journal.pone.0216051

Alternate Title

PLoS ONE

PMID

31063462

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