First name
Miriam
Middle name
J
Last name
Haviland

Title

Pregnancy-associated changes in cervical noncoding RNA.

Year of Publication

2020

Number of Pages

1013-1025

Date Published

2020 06

ISSN Number

1750-192X

Abstract

<p>To identify pregnancy-associated changes in cervical noncoding RNA (ncRNA), including miRNA and long noncoding RNA (lncRNA), and their potential effects on biologic processes. We enrolled 21 pregnant women with term deliveries (≥37&nbsp;weeks' gestation) in a prospective cohort and collected cervical swabs before 28&nbsp;weeks' gestation. We enrolled 21 nonpregnant controls. We analyzed miRNA, lncRNA and mRNA expression, applying a Bonferroni correction. Five miRNA and three lncRNA were significantly differentially (&gt;twofold change) expressed. Putative miRNA targets are enriched in genes mediating organogenesis, glucocorticoid signaling, cell adhesion and ncRNA machinery. Differential cervical ncRNA expression occurs in the setting of pregnancy. Gene ontology classification reveals biological pathways through which miRNA may play a biologic role in normal pregnancy physiology.</p>

DOI

10.2217/epi-2019-0231

Alternate Title

Epigenomics

PMID

32808540

Title

Adverse psychosocial factors in pregnancy and preterm delivery.

Year of Publication

2021

Date Published

2021 Mar 05

ISSN Number

1365-3016

Abstract

<p><strong>BACKGROUND: </strong>Mental health symptoms, stress, and low psychosocial resources are associated with preterm delivery. It is unknown if there are groups of women who experience similar patterns of these adverse psychosocial factors during pregnancy and if the risk of preterm delivery differs among these groups.</p>

<p><strong>OBJECTIVE: </strong>To identify groups of women with similar patterns of adverse psychosocial factors during pregnancy and determine whether the risk of preterm delivery differs among these groups.</p>

<p><strong>METHODS: </strong>Spontaneous Prematurity and Epigenetics of the Cervix (SPEC) is a prospective cohort study of pregnant women, aged 18 and older. In this analysis, we included women who enrolled after 24 August 2014 and delivered by 20 January 2019. As women could enrol more than once, our cohort included 774 women with 787 pregnancies. We conducted a latent class analysis to identify groups of women with similar patterns of adverse psychosocial factors during pregnancy based on their responses to measures assessing depression, perceived stress, anxiety (pregnancy-related and generalised), stressful life events, resilience, and social support (partner and friend/family). After identifying the latent classes, we used log-binomial regression to compare the incidence of preterm delivery among the classes.</p>

<p><strong>RESULTS: </strong>The median age among participants was 33.2&nbsp;years (interquartile range 30.3-36.3), and the majority were non-Hispanic white (56.9%). We identified three classes of adverse psychosocial factors (few, some, and many factors). In total, 63 (8.0%) pregnancies resulted in a preterm delivery. Compared to participants with few factors, the risk of preterm delivery was no different among participants with some (RR 1.23, 95% CI 0.68, 2.25) and many adverse factors (RR 1.62, 95% CI 0.73, 3.62).</p>

<p><strong>CONCLUSIONS: </strong>We identified three groups of pregnant women with similar patterns of adverse psychosocial factors. We did not observe a difference in the risk of preterm delivery among the classes.</p>

DOI

10.1111/ppe.12756

Alternate Title

Paediatr Perinat Epidemiol

PMID

33666948

Title

Racial and ethnic disparities in universal cervical length screening with transvaginal ultrasound.

Year of Publication

2016

Number of Pages

4078-81

Date Published

2016 Dec

ISSN Number

1476-4954

Abstract

<p><strong>OBJECTIVE: </strong>Determine if race or ethnicity is associated with missed or late transvaginal cervical length screening in a universal screening program.</p>

<p><strong>METHODS: </strong>Retrospective cohort study of nulliparous women with singleton gestations and a fetal anatomical ultrasound from 16-24 weeks' gestation from January 2012 to November 2013. We classified women into mutually exclusive racial and ethnic groups: non-Hispanic black (black), Hispanic, Asian, non-Hispanic white (white), and other or unknown race. We used log-binomial regression to calculate the risk ratio (RR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) of missed or late (≥20 weeks' gestation) screening versus optimally timed screening between the different racial and ethnic groups.</p>

<p><strong>RESULTS: </strong>Among the 2967 women in our study population, 971 (32.7%) had either missed or late cervical length screening. Compared to white women, black (RR: 1.3; 95% CI: 1.1-1.5) and Hispanic (RR:1.2; 95% CI: 1.01-1.5) women were more likely to have missed or late screening. Among women screened, black (versus white) women were more likely to be screened late (RR: 2.2; 95% CI: 1.6-3.1).</p>

<p><strong>CONCLUSIONS: </strong>Black and Hispanic women may be more likely to have missed or late cervical length screenings.</p>

DOI

10.3109/14767058.2016.1157577

Alternate Title

J. Matern. Fetal. Neonatal. Med.

PMID

26987873

Title

Long noncoding RNA expression in the cervix mid-pregnancy is associated with the length of gestation at delivery.

Year of Publication

2018

Number of Pages

742-750

Date Published

2018

ISSN Number

1559-2308

Abstract

<p>Infants born preterm are at increased risk of multiple morbidities and mortality. Why some women deliver preterm remains poorly understood. Prior studies have shown that cervical microRNA expression and DNA methylation are associated with the length of gestation. However, no study has examined the role of long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) in the cervix during pregnancy. To determine whether expression of lncRNAs is associated with length of gestation at delivery, we analyzed RNA from cervical swabs obtained from 78 women during pregnancy (mean 15.5, SD 5.0, weeks of gestation) who were participating in the Spontaneous Prematurity and Epigenetics of the Cervix (SPEC) Study in Boston, MA, USA. We used a PCR-based platform and found that 9 lncRNAs were expressed in at least 50% of the participants. Of these, a doubling of the expression of TUG1, TINCR, and FALEC was associated with shorter lengths of gestation at delivery [2.8 (95% CI: 0.31, 5.2); 3.3 (0.22, 6.3); and 4.5 (7.3, 1.6) days shorter respectively]. Of the lncRNAs analyzed, none was statistically associated with preterm birth, but expression of FALEC was 2.6-fold higher in women who delivered preterm vs. term (P&nbsp;=&nbsp;0.051). These findings demonstrate that lncRNAs can be measured in cervical samples obtained during pregnancy and are associated with subsequent length of gestation at delivery. Further, this study supports future work to replicate these findings in other cohorts and perform mechanistic studies to determine the role of lncRNAs in the cervix during pregnancy.</p>

DOI

10.1080/15592294.2018.1503490

Alternate Title

Epigenetics

PMID

30045669

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