First name
John
Middle name
A
Last name
Branda

Title

Two-Tier Lyme Disease Serology in Children with Previous Lyme Disease.

Year of Publication

2021

Date Published

2021 Oct 04

ISSN Number

1557-7759

Abstract

<p>A history of Lyme disease can complicate the interpretation of Lyme disease serology in acutely symptomatic patients. We prospectively enrolled children undergoing evaluation for Lyme disease in the emergency department of one of eight participating Pedi Lyme Net centers. We selected symptomatic children with a Lyme disease history (definite, probable, or none) as well as an available research biosample. We defined a Lyme disease case with either an erythema migrans (EM) lesion or positive two-tier serology with compatible symptoms. Using a generalized estimating equation, we examined the relationship between time from previous Lyme disease diagnosis and current Lyme disease after adjustment for patient demographics and symptoms as well as clustering by center. Of 2501 prospectively enrolled study patients, 126 (5.0%) reported a history of definite or probable Lyme disease. Of these children with previous Lyme disease, 47 met diagnostic criteria for Lyme disease at the time of enrollment (37.3%; 95% confidence interval [CI] 29.1-45.7%); 2 had an EM lesion, and 45 had positive two-tier Lyme disease serology. Over time from the previous Lyme disease diagnosis, the less likely the patient met diagnostic criteria for Lyme disease (adjusted odds ratio 0.62 per time period; 95% CI 0.46-0.84). For children with a history of Lyme disease before enrollment, one-third met the diagnostic criteria for acute Lyme disease with a declining rate over time from previous Lyme disease diagnosis. Novel Lyme disease diagnostics are needed to help distinguish acute from previous Lyme disease.</p>

DOI

10.1089/vbz.2021.0030

Alternate Title

Vector Borne Zoonotic Dis

PMID

34610255

Title

Pediatric Lyme Disease Biobank, United States, 2015-2020.

Year of Publication

2020

Number of Pages

3099-3101

Date Published

2020 Dec

ISSN Number

1080-6059

Abstract

<p>In 2015, we founded Pedi Lyme Net, a pediatric Lyme disease research network comprising 8 emergency departments in the United States. Of 2,497 children evaluated at 1 of these sites for Lyme disease, 515 (20.6%) were infected. This network is a unique resource for evaluating new approaches for diagnosing Lyme disease in children.</p>

DOI

10.3201/eid2612.200920

Alternate Title

Emerg Infect Dis

PMID

33219811

Title

Diagnostic Performance of C6 Enzyme Immunoassay for Lyme Arthritis.

Year of Publication

2019

Date Published

2019 Dec 13

ISSN Number

1098-4275

Abstract

<p><strong>OBJECTIVES: </strong>In Lyme disease endemic areas, initial management of children with arthritis can be challenging because diagnostic tests take several days to return results, leading to potentially unnecessary invasive procedures. Our objective was to examine the role of the C6 peptide enzyme immunoassay (EIA) test to guide initial management.</p>

<p><strong>METHODS: </strong>We enrolled children with acute arthritis undergoing evaluation for Lyme disease presenting to a participating Pedi Lyme Net emergency department (2015-2019) and performed a C6 EIA test. We defined Lyme arthritis with a positive or equivocal C6 EIA test result followed by a positive supplemental immunoblot result and defined septic arthritis as a positive synovial fluid culture result or a positive blood culture result with synovial fluid pleocytosis. Otherwise, children were considered to have inflammatory arthritis. We report the sensitivity and specificity of the C6 EIA for the diagnosis of Lyme arthritis.</p>

<p><strong>RESULTS: </strong>Of the 911 study patients, 211 children (23.2%) had Lyme arthritis, 11 (1.2%) had septic arthritis, and 689 (75.6%) had other inflammatory arthritis. A positive or equivocal C6 EIA result had a sensitivity of 100% (211 out of 211; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 98.2%-100%) and specificity of 94.2% (661 out of 700; 95% CI: 92.5%-95.9%) for Lyme arthritis. None of the 250 children with a positive or equivocal C6 EIA result had septic arthritis (0%; 95% CI: 0%-1.5%), although 75 children underwent diagnostic arthrocentesis and 27 underwent operative joint washout.</p>

<p><strong>CONCLUSIONS: </strong>In Lyme disease endemic areas, a C6 EIA result could be used to guide initial clinical decision-making, without misclassifying children with septic arthritis.</p>

DOI

10.1542/peds.2019-0593

Alternate Title

Pediatrics

PMID

31836615

Title

Higher C6 enzyme immunoassay index values correlate with a diagnosis of noncutaneous Lyme disease.

Year of Publication

2019

Number of Pages

160-164

Date Published

2019 Jun

ISSN Number

1879-0070

Abstract

<p>The correlation between the Food and Drug Administration-cleared C6 enzyme immunoassay (EIA) C6 index values and a diagnosis of Lyme disease has not been examined. We used pooled patient-level data from 5 studies of adults and children with Lyme disease and control subjects who were tested with the C6 EIA. We constructed a receiver operating characteristic curve using regression clustered by study and measured the area under the curve (AUC) to examine the accuracy of the C6 index values in differentiating between patients with noncutaneous Lyme disease and control subjects. In the 4821 included patients, the C6 index value had excellent ability to distinguish between patients with noncutaneous Lyme disease and control subjects [AUC 0.99; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.99-1.00]. An index value cut point of ≥3.0 had a sensitivity of 90.9% (95% CI, 87.8-93.3) and specificity of 99.0% (95% CI, 98.6-99.2%) for Lyme disease.</p>

DOI

10.1016/j.diagmicrobio.2018.12.001

Alternate Title

Diagn. Microbiol. Infect. Dis.

PMID

30642722

Title

Two-Tier Lyme Disease Serology Test Results Can Vary According to the Specific First-Tier Test Used.

Year of Publication

2019

Date Published

2019 Feb 22

ISSN Number

2048-7207

Abstract

<p><strong>BACKGROUND: </strong>Variability in 2-tier Lyme disease test results according to the specific first-tier enzyme immunoassay (EIA) in children has not been examined rigorously. In this study, we compared paired results of clinical 2-tier Lyme disease tests to those of the C6 peptide EIA followed by supplemental immunoblotting (C6 2-tier test).</p>

<p><strong>METHODS: </strong>We performed a prospective cohort study of children aged ≥1 to ≤21 years who were undergoing evaluation for Lyme disease in the emergency department at 1 of 6 centers located in regions in which Lyme disease is endemic. The clinical first-tier test and a C6 EIA were performed on the same serum sample with supplemental immunoblotting if the first-tier test result was either positive or equivocal. We compared the results of the paired clinical and C6 2-tier Lyme disease test results using the McNemar test.</p>

<p><strong>RESULTS: </strong>Of the 1714 children enrolled, we collected a research serum sample from 1584 (92.4%). The clinical 2-tier EIA result was positive in 316 (19.9%) children, and the C6 2-tier test result was positive or equivocal in 295 (18.6%) children. The clinical and C6 2-tier test results disagreed more often than they would have by chance alone (P = .002). Of the 39 children with either a positive clinical or C6 2-tier test result alone, 2 children had an erythema migrans (EM) lesion, and 29 had symptoms compatible with early disseminated Lyme disease.</p>

<p><strong>CONCLUSIONS: </strong>Two-tier Lyme disease test results differed for a substantial number of children on the basis of the specific first-tier test used. In children for whom there is a high clinical suspicion for Lyme disease and who have an initially negative test result, clinicians should consider retesting for Lyme disease.</p>

DOI

10.1093/jpids/piy133

Alternate Title

J Pediatric Infect Dis Soc

PMID

30793167

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