First name
Jessi
Last name
Erlichman

Title

Multi-omic Analysis of the Interaction between Clostridioides difficile Infection and Pediatric Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

Year of Publication

2020

Number of Pages

Date Published

2020 Aug 11

ISSN Number

1934-6069

Abstract

<p>Children with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) are particularly vulnerable to infection with Clostridioides difficile (CDI). IBD and IBD&nbsp;+ CDI have overlapping symptoms but respond to distinctive treatments, highlighting the need for diagnostic biomarkers. Here, we studied pediatric patients with IBD and IBD&nbsp;+ CDI, comparing longitudinal data on the gut microbiome, metabolome, and other measures. The microbiome is dysbiotic and heterogeneous in both disease states, but the metabolome reveals disease-specific patterns. The IBD group shows increased concentrations of markers of inflammation and tissue damage compared with healthy controls, and metabolic changes associate with susceptibility to CDI. In IBD&nbsp;+ CDI, we detect both metabolites associated with inflammation/tissue damage and fermentation products produced by C.&nbsp;difficile. The most discriminating metabolite found is isocaproyltaurine, a covalent conjugate of a distinctive C.&nbsp;difficile fermentation product (isocaproate) and an amino acid associated with tissue damage (taurine), which may be useful as a joint marker of the two disease processes.</p>

DOI

10.1016/j.chom.2020.07.020

Alternate Title

Cell Host Microbe

PMID

32822584
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Title

Development and pilot testing of a coping kit for parents of hospitalized children.

Year of Publication

2018

Number of Pages

Date Published

2018 Nov 08

ISSN Number

1876-2867

Abstract

<p><strong>OBJECTIVE: </strong>Serious pediatric illness places great stress on families. Parents who learn coping skills may better manage these stressors. This study sought to develop and refine a stress coping intervention for parents of hospitalized children, assess the intervention acceptability among these parents, and gather preliminary data on stress, negative and positive affect, anxiety, depression, and self-efficacy.</p>

<p><strong>METHODS: </strong>We conducted an observational study in 2 phases, enrolling parents of children who were inpatients with serious illness, 10 in Phase 1 and 40 in Phase 2. All parents completed at baseline measures of stress and psychological well-being and were introduced to the Coping Kit for Parents. Follow-up interviews were conducted at one week (all parents) and one month (Phase 2 parents only) regarding the acceptability of the intervention.</p>

<p><strong>RESULTS: </strong>At baseline, parents reported that stressful situations were frequent (mean=30.6, SD=6.8) and difficult (mean=26.2, SD=7.1), and revealed elevated levels of negative affect (mean=27.3, SD=7.7), depression (mean=8.5, SD=3.7) and anxiety (mean=11.3, SD=3.1), and moderate levels of self-efficacy related to their child's illness (mean=3.3, SD=0.5). The majority of parents used the kit regularly and on a scale of 1 to 7 agreed that the kit was helpful (mean=6.0, SD=0.9), interesting (mean=5.7, SD=1.3), practical (mean=5.7, SD=1.4), enjoyable (mean=6.0, SD=1.3), and they would recommend it to other parents (mean=6.4, SD=0.9).</p>

<p><strong>CONCLUSIONS: </strong>The Coping Kit for Parents is an acceptable stress management intervention that could be made available to parents of children with serious illness at pediatric hospitals with minimal staff training or time commitment.</p>

DOI

10.1016/j.acap.2018.11.001

Alternate Title

Acad Pediatr

PMID

30415078
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