First name
Debra
Last name
Lefkowitz

Title

Mental Health Disorders and Emergency Resource Use and Outcomes in Ventricular Assist Device Supported Patients.

Year of Publication

2021

Date Published

2021 Jun 02

ISSN Number

1097-6744

Abstract

<p>There are limited data describing the prevalence of mental health disorders (MHDOs) in patients with ventricular assist devices (VADs), or associations between MHDOs and resource use or outcomes. We used the Nationwide Emergency Department Sample administrative database to analyze 44,041 ED encounters for VAD-supported adults from 2010 to 2017, to assess the relationship between MHDOs and outcomes in this population. MHDO diagnoses were present for 23% of encounters, and were associated with higher charges and rates of admission, but lower mortality.</p>

DOI

10.1016/j.ahj.2021.05.018

Alternate Title

Am Heart J

PMID

34089695

Title

Pediatric Hand Transplantation: A Decision Analysis.

Year of Publication

2019

Number of Pages

1558944719890041

Date Published

2019 Dec 17

ISSN Number

1558-9455

Abstract

<p>The first successful bilateral pediatric hand transplant was performed in 2015. Previous hand transplant decision analysis models have focused on the adult population. This model principally aimed to determine whether adverse outcomes associated with immunosuppression outweigh the benefits of performing bilateral hand transplant surgery in a pediatric candidate. The model also conceptualized the valuation of losing years of life and sought to determine the impact of that valuation on the surgical decision. A decision model compared undergoing bilateral hand transplant surgery with using prosthetics for an 8-year-old patient. The outcome measure used was quality adjusted life years (QALYs), and sensitivity analysis was performed on the immunosuppressive risks associated with the surgical decision, as well as the perceived valuation of aversion to life years lost. The decision to perform surgery was marginally optimal compared to the prosthetic decision (50.11 QALY vs. 47.95 QALY). A Monte Carlo simulation revealed that this difference may be too marginal to detect an optimal decision (50.14 ± 8.28 QALY vs. 47.95 ± 2.12 QALY). Sensitivity analysis identified decision thresholds related to immunosuppression risks ( = 29% vs. = 33% modeled), and a trend of increasing risk as a patient is more averse to losing life years. The marginally optimal treatment strategy currently is bilateral hand transplant, compared to prosthetics for pediatric patients. Key determinants of the future optimal strategy will be whether immunosuppressive regimens become safer, with a reduced risk of losing life years due to immunosuppressive complications, and whether prosthetics become more acceptable and enable higher functioning.</p>

DOI

10.1177/1558944719890041

Alternate Title

Hand (N Y)

PMID

31847578

Title

18-month outcomes of heterologous bilateral hand transplantation in a child: a case report.

Year of Publication

2017

Number of Pages

35-44

Date Published

2017 Sep

ISSN Number

2352-4650

Abstract

<p><strong>BACKGROUND: </strong>Although heterologous vascular composite allotransplantation has become a burgeoning treatment option for adult amputees, there have been no successful cases previously reported in children. Here, we describe the surgical, immunological, and neurorehabilitation details with functional outcomes 18 months after heterologous bilateral hand and forearm transplantation in an 8-year-old child with quadrimembral amputations and a previous kidney transplant.</p>

<p><strong>METHODS: </strong>2 years of extensive preparation by medical and surgical teams preceded the hand-forearm transplantation of this child. The initial immunosuppressive protocol included thymoglobulin, tacrolimus, prednisone, and mycophenolate mofetil. In July, 2015, our vascularised composite allotransplantation team did the first bilateral hand and forearm transplantation in a child, an 8-year-old boy with previous living-related kidney transplantation. The surgery included four teams working simultaneously on the donor and recipient limbs, aided by customised cutting guides that aimed to reduce ischaemia time. Following an extended length of time in hospital, skin biopsies and close monitoring of renal function and drug concentrations occurred weekly for the first 3 months and were slowly tapered to monthly, and then quarterly. Skin biopsies were also done when tissue rejection was suspected. Paediatric-specific rehabilitation techniques were applied to promote patient engagement during rehabilitation. Progress was assessed by monthly sensory and motor function tests during routine clinic visits and with serial functional brain imaging studies, including structural brain MRI, magnetoencephalography and transcranial magnetic stimulation.</p>

<p><strong>FINDINGS: </strong>The surgery lasted 10 h and 40 min. Vascular revision of the ulnar artery was required a few hours postoperatively. There were no further immediate postsurgical complications. Rejection episodes occurred throughout the first year but were reversed. An increase in serum creatinine led to the addition of sirolimus at 3 months after transplantation with concomitant reduction in tacrolimus targets. Sensibility to light touch was present by 6 months after transplantation. Intrinsic hand muscle innervation was present by 7-10 months after transplantation. At 18 months, the child had exceeded his previous adapted abilities. As of 18 months after transplantation surgery he is able to write and feed, toilet, and dress himself more independently and efficiently than he could do before transplantation. He remains on four immunosuppressive medications and functional neuroimaging studies have shown motor and somatosensory cortical reorganisation.</p>

<p><strong>INTERPRETATION: </strong>Hand transplantation in a child can be surgically, medically, and functionally successful under carefully considered circumstances. Long-term data on the functional trajectory, neurological recovery, psychological sequelae, and the potential late effect of immunosuppression are still needed to support broader implementation of paediatric vascular composite allotransplantation.</p>

<p><strong>FUNDING: </strong>The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia.</p>

DOI

10.1016/S2352-4642(17)30012-3

Alternate Title

Lancet Child Adolesc Health

PMID

30169225

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