First name
Levon
Last name
Utidjian

Title

Diagnostic Code-Based Screening for Identifying Children with Primary Hyperoxaluria.

Year of Publication

2022

Number of Pages

898-905

Date Published

12/2022

ISSN Number

1527-3792

Abstract

PURPOSE: We evaluated the utility of diagnostic codes to screen for patients with primary hyperoxaluria (PH) and evaluate their positive predictive value (PPV) in identifying children with this rare condition in PEDSnet, a clinical research network of pediatric health systems that shares electronic health records data.

MATERIALS AND METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional study of children who received care at 7 PEDSnet institutions from January 2009 through January 2021. We developed and applied screening criteria using diagnostic codes that generated 3 categories of the hypothesized probability of PH. Tier 1 had specific diagnostic codes for PH; tier 2 had codes for hyperoxaluria, oxalate nephropathy, or oxalosis; and tier 3 had a combination of ≥2 codes for disorder of carbohydrate metabolism and ≥1 code for kidney stones. We reviewed the electronic health records of patients with possible PH to confirm PH diagnosis and evaluate the accuracy and timing of diagnostic codes. The PPV of the codes was compared across tiers, time, PH type, and site.

RESULTS: We identified 341 patients in the screen; 33 had confirmed PH (9.7%). Tier 1 had the highest proportion of PH; however, the PPV was only 20%. The degree to which an institution accurately represented point of care diagnoses in the data extraction process was predictive of higher PPV. The PPV of diagnostic codes was highest for PH3 (100%) and lowest for PH1 (22.8%).

CONCLUSIONS: Diagnostic codes for PH have poor PPV. Findings suggest that one should be careful in research using large databases in which source validation is not possible.

DOI

10.1097/JU.0000000000002863

Alternate Title

J Urol

PMID

35930731

Title

Human-centered development of an electronic health record-embedded, interactive information visualization in the emergency department using fast healthcare interoperability resources.

Year of Publication

2021

Date Published

2021 Mar 03

ISSN Number

1527-974X

Abstract

<p><strong>OBJECTIVE: </strong>Develop and evaluate an interactive information visualization embedded within the electronic health record (EHR) by following human-centered design (HCD) processes and leveraging modern health information exchange standards.</p>

<p><strong>MATERIALS AND METHODS: </strong>We applied an HCD process to develop a Fast Healthcare Interoperability Resources (FHIR) application that displays a patient's asthma history to clinicians in a pediatric emergency department. We performed a preimplementation comparative system evaluation to measure time on task, number of screens, information retrieval accuracy, cognitive load, user satisfaction, and perceived utility and usefulness. Application usage and system functionality were assessed using application logs and a postimplementation survey of end users.</p>

<p><strong>RESULTS: </strong>Usability testing of the Asthma Timeline Application demonstrated a statistically significant reduction in time on task (P &lt; .001), number of screens (P &lt; .001), and cognitive load (P &lt; .001) for clinicians when compared to base EHR functionality. Postimplementation evaluation demonstrated reliable functionality and high user satisfaction.</p>

<p><strong>DISCUSSION: </strong>Following HCD processes to develop an application in the context of clinical operations/quality improvement is feasible. Our work also highlights the potential benefits and challenges associated with using internationally recognized data exchange standards as currently implemented.</p>

<p><strong>CONCLUSION: </strong>Compared to standard EHR functionality, our visualization increased clinician efficiency when reviewing the charts of pediatric asthma patients. Application development efforts in an operational context should leverage existing health information exchange standards, such as FHIR, and evidence-based mixed methods approaches.</p>

DOI

10.1093/jamia/ocab016

Alternate Title

J Am Med Inform Assoc

PMID

33682004

Title

Influence of simulation on electronic health record use patterns among pediatric residents.

Year of Publication

2018

Date Published

2018 Aug 21

ISSN Number

1527-974X

Abstract

<p><strong>Objective: </strong>Electronic health record (EHR) simulation with realistic test patients has improved recognition of safety concerns in test environments. We assessed if simulation affects EHR use patterns in real clinical settings.</p>

<p><strong>Materials and Methods: </strong>We created a 1-hour educational intervention of a simulated admission for pediatric interns. Data visualization and information retrieval tools were introduced to facilitate recognition of the patient's clinical status. Using EHR audit logs, we assessed the frequency with which these tools were accessed by residents prior to simulation exposure (intervention group, pre-simulation), after simulation exposure (intervention group, post-simulation), and among residents who never participated in simulation (control group).</p>

<p><strong>Results: </strong>From July 2015 to February 2017, 57 pediatric residents participated in a simulation and 82 did not. Residents were more likely to use the data visualization tool after simulation (73% in post-simulation weeks vs 47% of combined pre-simulation and control weeks, P &lt;. 0001) as well as the information retrieval tool (85% vs 36%, P &lt; .0001). After adjusting for residents' experiences measured in previously completed inpatient weeks of service, simulation remained a significant predictor of using the data visualization (OR 2.8, CI: 2.1-3.9) and information retrieval tools (OR 3.0, CI: 2.0-4.5). Tool use did not decrease in interrupted time-series analysis over a median of 19 (IQR: 8-32) weeks of post-simulation follow-up.</p>

<p><strong>Discussion: </strong>Simulation was associated with persistent changes to EHR use patterns among pediatric residents.</p>

<p><strong>Conclusion: </strong>EHR simulation is an effective educational method that can change participants' use patterns in real clinical settings.</p>

DOI

10.1093/jamia/ocy105

Alternate Title

J Am Med Inform Assoc

PMID

30137348

WATCH THIS PAGE

Subscription is not available for this page.