First name
Arti
Middle name
D
Last name
Desai

Title

Social Disadvantage, Access to Care, and Disparities in Physical Functioning Among Children Hospitalized with Respiratory Illness.

Year of Publication

2020

Number of Pages

e1-e8

Date Published

2020 Feb 11

ISSN Number

1553-5606

Abstract

<p><strong>BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: </strong>Understanding disparities in child health-related quality of life (HRQoL) may reveal opportunities for targeted improvement. This study examined associations between social disadvantage, access to care, and child physical functioning before and after hospitalization for acute respiratory illness.</p>

<p><strong>METHODS: </strong>From July 1, 2014, to June 30, 2016, children ages 8-16 years and/or caregivers of children 2 weeks to 16 years admitted to five tertiary care children's hospitals for three common respiratory illnesses completed a survey on admission and within 2 to 8 weeks after discharge. Survey items assessed social disadvantage (minority race/ ethnicity, limited English proficiency, low education, and low income), difficulty/delays accessing care, and baseline and follow-up HRQoL physical functioning using the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory (PedsQL, range 0-100). We examined associations between these three variables at baseline and follow-up using multivariable, mixed-effects linear regression models with multiple imputation sensitivity analyses for missing data.</p>

<p><strong>RESULTS: </strong>A total of 1,325 patients and/or their caregivers completed both PedsQL assessments. Adjusted mean baseline PedsQL scores were significantly lower for patients with social disadvantage markers, compared with those of patients with none (78.7 for &gt;3 markers versus 85.5 for no markers, difference -6.1 points (95% CI: -8.7, -3.5). The number of social disadvantage markers was not associated with mean follow-up PedsQL scores. Difficulty/delays accessing care were associated with lower PedsQL scores at both time points, but it was not a significant effect modifier between social disadvantage and PedsQL scores.</p>

<p><strong>CONCLUSIONS: </strong>Having social disadvantage markers or difficulty/delays accessing care was associated with lower baseline physical functioning; however, differences were reduced after hospital discharge.</p>

DOI

10.12788/jhm.3359

Alternate Title

J Hosp Med

PMID

32118564

Title

Perceived Access to Outpatient Care and Hospital Reutilization following Acute Respiratory Illnesses.

Year of Publication

2018

Date Published

2018 Jul 24

ISSN Number

1876-2867

Abstract

<p><strong>OBJECTIVE: </strong>Efforts to decrease hospital revisits often focus on improving access to outpatient follow-up. Our objective was to assess the relationship between perceived access to timely office-based care and subsequent 30-day revisits following hospital discharge for four common respiratory illnesses.</p>

<p><strong>METHODS: </strong>This was a prospective cohort study of children 2 weeks-16 years admitted to five United States children's hospitals for asthma, bronchiolitis, croup, or pneumonia between 7/2014-6/2016. Hospital and ED (in the case of croup) admission surveys administered to caregivers included the Consumer Assessments of Healthcare Providers and Systems (CAHPS©) Timely Access to Care. Access composite scores (range 0-100, higher score indicating better access) were linked with 30-day ED revisits and inpatient readmissions from the Pediatric Health Information System (PHIS). The relationship between access to timely care and repeat utilization was assessed using multivariable logistic regression adjusting for demographics, hospitalization, and home/outpatient factors.</p>

<p><strong>RESULTS: </strong>Of the 2,438 children enrolled, 2179 (89%) reported an office visit in the last 6 months. Average access composite score was 52.0 (standard deviation 36.3). In adjusted analyses, higher access scores were associated with higher odds of 30-day ED revisits (odds ratio [OR] 1.07; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.02-1.13) - particularly for croup (OR 1.17; 95% CI 1.02-1.36) - but not inpatient readmissions (OR 1.02; 95% CI 0.96 - 1.09).</p>

<p><strong>CONCLUSIONS: </strong>Perceived access to timely office-based care was associated with significantly higher odds of subsequent ED revisit. Focusing solely on enhancing timely access to care following discharge for common respiratory illnesses may be insufficient to prevent repeat utilization.</p>

DOI

10.1016/j.acap.2018.07.001

Alternate Title

Acad Pediatr

PMID

30053631

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