First name
Michael
Middle name
E
Last name
Scheurer

Title

Rates of laboratory adverse events by course in paediatric leukaemia ascertained with automated electronic health record extraction: a retrospective cohort study from the Children's Oncology Group.

Year of Publication

2022

Number of Pages

e678-e688

Date Published

07/2022

ISSN Number

2352-3026

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Adverse events are often misreported in clinical trials, leading to an incomplete understanding of toxicities. We aimed to test automated laboratory adverse event ascertainment and grading (via the ExtractEHR automated package) to assess its scalability and define adverse event rates for children with acute myeloid leukaemia and acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

METHODS: For this retrospective cohort study from the Children's Oncology Group (COG), we included patients aged 0-22 years treated for acute myeloid leukaemia or acute lymphoblastic leukaemia at Children's Healthcare of Atlanta (Atlanta, GA, USA) from Jan 1, 2010, to Nov 1, 2018, at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (Philadelphia, PA, USA) from Jan 1, 2011, to Dec 31, 2014, and at the Texas Children's Hospital (Houston, TX, USA) from Jan 1, 2011, to Dec 31, 2014. The ExtractEHR automated package acquired, cleaned, and graded laboratory data as per Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE) version 5 for 22 commonly evaluated grade 3-4 adverse events (fatal events were not evaluated) with numerically based CTCAE definitions. Descriptive statistics tabulated adverse event frequencies. Adverse events ascertained by ExtractEHR were compared to manually reported adverse events for patients enrolled in two COG trials (AAML1031, NCT01371981; AALL0932, NCT02883049). Analyses were restricted to protocol-defined chemotherapy courses (induction I, induction II, intensification I, intensification II, and intensification III for acute myeloid leukaemia; induction, consolidation, interim maintenance, delayed intensification, and maintenance for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia).

FINDINGS: Laboratory adverse event data from 1077 patients (583 from Children's Healthcare of Atlanta, 200 from the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, and 294 from the Texas Children's Hospital) who underwent 4611 courses (549 for acute myeloid leukaemia and 4062 for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia) were extracted, processed, and graded. Of the 166 patients with acute myeloid leukaemia, 86 (52%) were female, 80 (48%) were male, 96 (58%) were White, and 132 (80%) were non-Hispanic. Of the 911 patients with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia, 406 (45%) were female, 505 (55%) were male, 596 (65%) were White, and 641 (70%) were non-Hispanic. Patients with acute myeloid leukaemia had the most adverse events during induction I and intensification II. Hypokalaemia (one [17%] of six to 75 [48%] of 156 courses) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) increased (13 [10%] of 134 to 27 [17%] of 156 courses) were the most prevalent non-haematological adverse events in patients with acute myeloid leukaemia, as identified by ExtractEHR. Patients with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia had the greatest number of adverse events during induction and maintenance (eight adverse events with prevalence ≥10%; induction and maintenance: anaemia, platelet count decreased, white blood cell count decreased, neutrophil count decreased, lymphocyte count decreased, ALT increased, and hypocalcaemia; induction: hypokalaemia; maintenance: aspartate aminotransferase [AST] increased and blood bilirubin increased), as identified by ExtractEHR. 187 (85%) of 220 total comparisons in 22 adverse events in four AAML1031 and six AALL0923 courses were substantially higher with ExtractEHR than COG-reported adverse event rates for adverse events with a prevalence of at least 2%.

INTERPRETATION: ExtractEHR is scalable and accurately defines laboratory adverse event rates for paediatric acute leukaemia; moreover, ExtractEHR seems to detect higher rates of laboratory adverse events than those reported in COG trials. These rates can be used for comparisons between therapies and to counsel patients treated on or off trials about the risks of chemotherapy. ExtractEHR-based adverse event ascertainment can improve reporting of laboratory adverse events in clinical trials.

FUNDING: US National Institutes of Health, St Baldrick's Foundation, and Alex's Lemonade Stand Foundation.

DOI

10.1016/S2352-3026(22)00168-5

Alternate Title

Lancet Haematol

PMID

35870472

Title

Rates of laboratory adverse events by course in paediatric leukaemia ascertained with automated electronic health record extraction: a retrospective cohort study from the Children's Oncology Group.

Year of Publication

2022

Number of Pages

e678-e688

Date Published

07/2022

ISSN Number

2352-3026

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Adverse events are often misreported in clinical trials, leading to an incomplete understanding of toxicities. We aimed to test automated laboratory adverse event ascertainment and grading (via the ExtractEHR automated package) to assess its scalability and define adverse event rates for children with acute myeloid leukaemia and acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

METHODS: For this retrospective cohort study from the Children's Oncology Group (COG), we included patients aged 0-22 years treated for acute myeloid leukaemia or acute lymphoblastic leukaemia at Children's Healthcare of Atlanta (Atlanta, GA, USA) from Jan 1, 2010, to Nov 1, 2018, at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (Philadelphia, PA, USA) from Jan 1, 2011, to Dec 31, 2014, and at the Texas Children's Hospital (Houston, TX, USA) from Jan 1, 2011, to Dec 31, 2014. The ExtractEHR automated package acquired, cleaned, and graded laboratory data as per Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE) version 5 for 22 commonly evaluated grade 3-4 adverse events (fatal events were not evaluated) with numerically based CTCAE definitions. Descriptive statistics tabulated adverse event frequencies. Adverse events ascertained by ExtractEHR were compared to manually reported adverse events for patients enrolled in two COG trials (AAML1031, NCT01371981; AALL0932, NCT02883049). Analyses were restricted to protocol-defined chemotherapy courses (induction I, induction II, intensification I, intensification II, and intensification III for acute myeloid leukaemia; induction, consolidation, interim maintenance, delayed intensification, and maintenance for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia).

FINDINGS: Laboratory adverse event data from 1077 patients (583 from Children's Healthcare of Atlanta, 200 from the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, and 294 from the Texas Children's Hospital) who underwent 4611 courses (549 for acute myeloid leukaemia and 4062 for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia) were extracted, processed, and graded. Of the 166 patients with acute myeloid leukaemia, 86 (52%) were female, 80 (48%) were male, 96 (58%) were White, and 132 (80%) were non-Hispanic. Of the 911 patients with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia, 406 (45%) were female, 505 (55%) were male, 596 (65%) were White, and 641 (70%) were non-Hispanic. Patients with acute myeloid leukaemia had the most adverse events during induction I and intensification II. Hypokalaemia (one [17%] of six to 75 [48%] of 156 courses) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) increased (13 [10%] of 134 to 27 [17%] of 156 courses) were the most prevalent non-haematological adverse events in patients with acute myeloid leukaemia, as identified by ExtractEHR. Patients with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia had the greatest number of adverse events during induction and maintenance (eight adverse events with prevalence ≥10%; induction and maintenance: anaemia, platelet count decreased, white blood cell count decreased, neutrophil count decreased, lymphocyte count decreased, ALT increased, and hypocalcaemia; induction: hypokalaemia; maintenance: aspartate aminotransferase [AST] increased and blood bilirubin increased), as identified by ExtractEHR. 187 (85%) of 220 total comparisons in 22 adverse events in four AAML1031 and six AALL0923 courses were substantially higher with ExtractEHR than COG-reported adverse event rates for adverse events with a prevalence of at least 2%.

INTERPRETATION: ExtractEHR is scalable and accurately defines laboratory adverse event rates for paediatric acute leukaemia; moreover, ExtractEHR seems to detect higher rates of laboratory adverse events than those reported in COG trials. These rates can be used for comparisons between therapies and to counsel patients treated on or off trials about the risks of chemotherapy. ExtractEHR-based adverse event ascertainment can improve reporting of laboratory adverse events in clinical trials.

FUNDING: US National Institutes of Health, St Baldrick's Foundation, and Alex's Lemonade Stand Foundation.

DOI

10.1016/S2352-3026(22)00168-5

Alternate Title

Lancet Haematol

PMID

35870472

Title

Factors Associated With Penicillin Allergy Labels in Electronic Health Records of Children in 2 Large US Pediatric Primary Care Networks.

Year of Publication

2022

Number of Pages

e222117

Date Published

2022 Mar 01

ISSN Number

2574-3805

Abstract

<p><strong>Importance: </strong>Penicillin allergy labels influence clinical decision-making, yet most children who are labeled do not have type 1 hypersensitivity allergic reactions and instead have a history of predictable adverse reactions or unspecified illness symptoms while receiving penicillin for viral infections. Studies describing penicillin allergy labeling in the pediatric outpatient setting are lacking.</p>

<p><strong>Objective: </strong>To describe the epidemiology and factors associated with penicillin allergy labels across 2 large US pediatric primary care networks.</p>

<p><strong>Design, Setting, and Participants: </strong>This retrospective, longitudinal birth cohort study was conducted in 90 primary care pediatric practices serving a diverse population of children across Houston, Texas, Austin, Texas, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and parts of New Jersey. Participants were children born between January 2010 and June 2020 who had a health care visit in the first 14 days of life and at least 2 additional visits in the first year of life at one of 90 primary care pediatric practices. Censoring criteria were additionally applied to exclude data from children no longer seeking health care in the 90 clinics over time. Statistical analysis was performed from February to May 2021.</p>

<p><strong>Exposures: </strong>Basic patient demographics, health care utilization, penicillin exposure, and primary clinic location.</p>

<p><strong>Main Outcomes and Measures: </strong>Addition of penicillin allergy label in the electronic medical record.</p>

<p><strong>Results: </strong>Among 334 465 children in the birth cohort, 164 173 (49.1%) were female; 72 831 (21.8%) were Hispanic, 59 598 (17.8%) were non-Hispanic Black, and 148 534 (44.4%) were non-Hispanic White; the median (IQR) age at censoring was 3.8 (1.7-6.6) years; 18 015 (5.4%) were labeled as penicillin allergic, but the prevalence of penicillin allergy labeling ranged from 0.9% to 10.2% across practices. Children were labeled at a median (IQR) age of 1.3 (0.9-2.3) years. Non-Hispanic White children were more likely to be labeled compared with non-Hispanic Black children after controlling for potential confounders (adjusted odds ratio, 1.7 [95% CI, 1.6-1.8]). There were 6797 allergic children (37.7%) labeled after receiving 1 penicillin prescription and 1423 (7.9%) labeled after receiving 0 penicillin prescriptions.</p>

<p><strong>Conclusions and Relevance: </strong>In this cohort study of more than 330 000 children, penicillin allergy labeling was common and varied widely across practices. Children were labeled early in life, and almost half were labeled after receiving 1 or 0 penicillin prescriptions. These findings raise questions regarding the validity of penicillin allergy labels. Future work exploring the fidelity of and outcomes associated with penicillin allergy-labeling in children is warranted.</p>

DOI

10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2022.2117

Alternate Title

JAMA Netw Open

PMID

35285918

Title

A report from the Leukemia Electronic Abstraction of Records Network on risk of hepatotoxicity during pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia treatment.

Year of Publication

2022

Date Published

2022 Jan 27

ISSN Number

1592-8721

Abstract

<p>Not available.</p>

DOI

10.3324/haematol.2021.279805

Alternate Title

Haematologica

PMID

35081687

Title

An overview of disparities in childhood cancer: Report on the Inaugural Symposium on Childhood Cancer Health Disparities, Houston, Texas, 2016.

Year of Publication

2018

Number of Pages

1-16

Date Published

2018 May 08

ISSN Number

1521-0669

Abstract

<p>The Inaugural Symposium on Childhood Cancer Health Disparities was held in Houston, Texas, on November 2, 2016. The symposium was attended by 109 scientists and clinicians from diverse disciplinary backgrounds with interests in pediatric cancer disparities and focused on reviewing our current knowledge of disparities in cancer risk and outcomes for select childhood cancers. Following a full day of topical sessions, everyone participated in a brainstorming session to develop a working strategy for the continued expansion of research in this area. This meeting was designed to serve as a springboard for examination of childhood cancer disparities from a more unified and systematic approach and to enhance awareness of this area of need.</p>

DOI

10.1080/08880018.2018.1464088

Alternate Title

Pediatr Hematol Oncol

PMID

29737912

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