First name
Vineeta
Last name
Mittal

Title

Intravenous Magnesium and Hospital Outcomes in Children Hospitalized With Asthma.

Year of Publication

2021

Date Published

2021 Jul 01

ISSN Number

2154-1671

Abstract

<p><strong>BACKGROUND: </strong>Use of intravenous magnesium (IVMg) for childhood asthma exacerbations has increased significantly in the last decade. Emergency department administration of IVMg has been shown to reduce asthma hospitalization, yet most children receiving IVMg in the emergency department are subsequently hospitalized. Our objective with the study was to examine hospital outcomes of children given IVMg for asthma exacerbations.</p>

<p><strong>METHODS: </strong>We conducted a retrospective cohort study using data from the Pediatric Health Information System. We used propensity score matching to compare children who received IVMg on the first day of hospitalization with those who did not. Primary outcomes were initiation and duration of noninvasive positive pressure ventilation. Secondary outcomes included mechanical ventilation (MV) initiation, duration of MV, length of stay, and subsequent tertiary medication use. Primary analysis was restricted to children admitted to nonintensive care inpatient units.</p>

<p><strong>RESULTS: </strong>Overall, 91 309 hospitalizations met inclusion criteria. IVMg was administered in 25 882 (28.4%) children. After propensity score matching, IVMg was not significantly associated with lower initiation (adjusted odds ratio 0.88; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.74-1.05) or shorter duration of noninvasive positive pressure ventilation (rate ratio 0.94; 95% CI 0.87-1.02). Similarly, no significant associations were seen for MV initiation, MV duration, or length of stay. IVMg was associated with lower subsequent tertiary medication use (adjusted odds ratio 0.66; 95% CI 0.60-0.72). However, the association was lost when ipratropium was removed from the tertiary medication definition.</p>

<p><strong>CONCLUSIONS: </strong>IVMg administration was not significantly associated with improved hospital outcomes. Further study is needed to inform the optimal indications and timing of magnesium use during hospitalization.</p>

DOI

10.1542/hpeds.2020-004770

Alternate Title

Hosp Pediatr

PMID

34210764

Title

Trends in Intravenous Magnesium Use and Outcomes for Status Asthmaticus in Children's Hospitals from 2010 to 2017.

Year of Publication

2020

Number of Pages

403-406

Date Published

2020 07 01

ISSN Number

1553-5606

Abstract

<p>Intravenous (IV) magnesium is used as an adjunct therapy in management of status asthmaticus with a goal of reducing intubation rate. A recent review suggests that IV magnesium use in status asthmaticus reduces admission rates. This is contrary to the observation of practicing emergency room physicians. The goal of this study was to assess trends in IV magnesium use for status asthmaticus in US children's hospitals over 8 years through a retrospective analysis of children younger than 18 years using the Pediatric Health Information System database. Outcomes were IV magnesium use, inpatient and intensive care unit admission rate, geometric mean length of stay, and 7-day all-cause readmission rate. IV magnesium use for asthma hospitalization more than doubled over 8 years (17% vs. 36%; P &lt; .001). Yearly trends were not significantly associated with hospital or intensive care unit admission rate or 7-day all-cause readmissions, although length of stay was reduced (P &lt; .001).</p>

DOI

10.12788/jhm.3405

Alternate Title

J Hosp Med

PMID

32584247

Title

Impact of Discharge Components on Readmission Rates for Children Hospitalized with Asthma.

Year of Publication

2018

Number of Pages

175-181.e2

Date Published

2018 Apr

ISSN Number

1097-6833

Abstract

<p><strong>OBJECTIVES: </strong>To describe hospital-based asthma-specific discharge components at children's hospitals and determine the association of these discharge components with pediatric asthma readmission rates.</p>

<p><strong>STUDY DESIGN: </strong>This is a multicenter retrospective cohort study of pediatric asthma hospitalizations in 2015 at children's hospitals participating in the Pediatric Health Information System. Children ages 5 to 17 years were included. An electronic survey assessing 13 asthma-specific discharge components was sent to quality leaders at all 49 hospitals. Correlations of combinations of asthma-specific discharge components and adjusted readmission rates were calculated.</p>

<p><strong>RESULTS: </strong>The survey response rate was 92% (45 of 49 hospitals). Thirty-day and 3-month adjusted readmission rates varied across hospitals, ranging from 1.9% to 3.9% for 30-day readmissions and 5.7% to 9.1% for 3-month readmissions. No individual or combination discharge components were associated with lower 30-day adjusted readmission rates. The only single-component significantly associated with a lower rate of readmission at 3 months was having comprehensive content of education (P &lt; .029). Increasing intensity of discharge components in bundles was associated with reduced adjusted 3-month readmission rates, but this did not reach statistical significance. This was seen in a 2-discharge component bundle including content of education and communication with the primary medical doctor, as well as a 3-discharge component bundle, which included content of education, medications in-hand, and home-based environmental mitigation.</p>

<p><strong>CONCLUSIONS: </strong>Children's hospitals demonstrate a range of asthma-specific discharge components. Although we found no significant associations for specific hospital-level discharge components and asthma readmission rates at 30 days, certain combinations of discharge components may support hospitals to reduce healthcare utilization at 3 months.</p>

DOI

10.1016/j.jpeds.2017.11.062

PMID

29395170

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