First name
Adam
Middle name
M
Last name
Huber

Title

Development and Acceptability of a Patient Decision Aid for Pain Management in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis: The JIA Option Map.

Year of Publication

2020

Date Published

2020 Oct 09

ISSN Number

1178-1661

Abstract

<p><strong>BACKGROUND: </strong>Youths with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) often experience pain, which reduces their quality of life. A diversity of pain management options exists for these patients, but few discussions happen in clinical settings. Our team is developing a web-based patient decision aid (PDA) to help youths with JIA, parents, and their health care providers (HCPs) make informed and preference-based decisions about pain management options.</p>

<p><strong>OBJECTIVE: </strong>The objective of this study was to develop a paper-based prototype of the web-based PDA and to assess its acceptability.</p>

<p><strong>METHODS: </strong>We developed a paper-based prototype of the PDA, called the JIA Option Map, using an iterative process following the International Patient Decision Aid Standards and based on the Ottawa Decision Support Framework. We held three consensus meetings and a follow-up online survey followed by discussions among team members to agree on the format and content of the PDA. We then evaluated acceptability through interviews with 12 youth with JIA (aged 8-18 years), 12 parents, and 11 HCPs. Participants from rheumatology clinics in Canada and the USA reviewed the PDA and assessed its usefulness, content, and format. Interviews were audiotaped, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed using simple descriptive content analysis.</p>

<p><strong>RESULTS: </strong>The PDA contains an assessment of pain and current treatments, a values-clarification exercise, a list of 33 treatment options with evidence-based information, and a goal-setting exercise. All participants agreed that it would be a useful tool for making decisions about pain management. Participants appreciated the incorporation of scientific evidence and visuals to demonstrate the benefits of treatment options but suggested describing the source of the evidence more thoroughly. Participants suggested adding complementary medicine and nutrition to the available treatment options and removing options that are primarily used to reduce inflammation. Most participants preferred an interactive web-based version of the PDA that would show a few options consistent with their preferences, followed by a discussion with HCPs.</p>

<p><strong>CONCLUSION: </strong>The PDA was deemed acceptable to all participants, with a few modifications. This feedback was used to improve the PDA by simplifying and clarifying the information and adjusting the number of treatment options presented. Work is underway to develop an interactive web-based version with an algorithm to present options tailored to each user.</p>

DOI

10.1007/s40271-020-00458-z

Alternate Title

Patient

PMID

33033937

Title

The Childhood Arthritis & Rheumatology Research Alliance Consensus Treatment Plans: Towards Comparative Effectiveness in the Pediatric Rheumatic Diseases.

Year of Publication

2018

Date Published

2018 Jan 15

ISSN Number

2326-5205

Abstract

<p>The pediatric rheumatic diseases are a heterogeneous group of rare diseases, posing a number of challenges for the use of traditional clinical and translational research approaches. Innovative comparative effectiveness approaches are needed to efficiently study treatment approaches and disease outcomes. The Childhood Arthritis and Rheumatology Research Alliance (CARRA) developed the consensus treatment plan (CTP) approach as a comparative effectiveness tool for research in pediatric rheumatology. CTPs are treatment strategies, developed by consensus methods among CARRA members, intended to reduce variation in treatment approaches, standardize outcome measurements, and allow for comparison of the effectiveness of different approaches with the goal of improving disease outcomes. To date, CTPs have been published for 7 different diseases and disease manifestations. The approach has been successfully piloted for juvenile localized scleroderma, systemic onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), polyarticular JIA, dermatomyositis, and lupus nephritis. Large-scale studies are underway for systemic JIA and polyarticular JIA, with the CARRA patient registry serving as the data collection platform. These studies have been designed with stakeholder involvement, including active input from CARRA providers, patients, and parents, with the goal of increasing the feasibility and ensuring the relevance of the outcomes. These studies include ancillary biospecimen collection intended to support additional translational and mechanistic studies. Data from these ongoing CTP studies will provide more information on the ability of this approach to identify effective treatment strategies and improve outcomes for the pediatric rheumatic diseases. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.</p>

DOI

10.1002/art.40395

PMID

29333701

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