First name
Aris
Middle name
C
Last name
Garro

Title

Validation of Septic Knee Monoarthritis Prediction Rule in a Lyme Disease Endemic Area.

Year of Publication

2021

Date Published

2021 May 13

ISSN Number

1535-1815

Abstract

<p><strong>OBJECTIVE: </strong>In Lyme disease endemic areas, Lyme and septic arthritis often present similarly. A published septic knee arthritis clinical prediction rule includes 2 high-risk predictors: absolute neutrophil count of 10,000 cells/mm or greater and erythrocyte sedimentation rate of 40 mm/h or greater. The objective of the study was to externally validate this prediction rule in a multicenter prospective cohort.</p>

<p><strong>METHODS: </strong>We enrolled a prospective cohort of children with knee monoarthritis undergoing evaluation for Lyme disease at 1 of 8 Pedi Lyme Net emergency departments located in endemic areas. We defined a case of septic arthritis with a positive synovial fluid culture or a synovial fluid white blood cell count of 50,000 or greater per high powered field with a positive blood culture and Lyme arthritis with a positive or equivocal C6 EIA, followed by a positive supplemental immunoblot. Other children were classified as having inflammatory arthritis. We report the performance of the septic arthritis clinical prediction rule in our study population.</p>

<p><strong>RESULTS: </strong>Of the 543 eligible children, 13 had septic arthritis (2.4%), 234 Lyme arthritis (43.1%), and 296 inflammatory arthritis (54.5%). Of the 457 children (84.2%) with available laboratory predictors, all children with septic arthritis were classified as high risk (sensitivity, 100%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 62.8%-100%; specificity, 68.1%; 95% CI, 63.6-73.3; negative predictive value, 278/278 [100%]; 95% CI, 98.6%-100%). Of the 303 low-risk children, 52 (17.2%) underwent diagnostic arthrocentesis.</p>

<p><strong>CONCLUSIONS: </strong>The septic knee arthritis clinical prediction rule accurately distinguished between septic and Lyme arthritis in an endemic area. Clinical application may reduce unnecessary invasive diagnostic procedures.</p>

DOI

10.1097/PEC.0000000000002455

Alternate Title

Pediatr Emerg Care

PMID

34160185

Title

Validation of the Rule of 7's for Identifying Children at Low-risk for Lyme Meningitis.

Year of Publication

2021

Number of Pages

306-309

Date Published

2021 Apr 01

ISSN Number

1532-0987

Abstract

<p><b>BACKGROUND: </b>The Rule of 7's classifies children as low-risk for Lyme meningitis with the absence of the following: ≥7 days of headache, any cranial neuritis or ≥70% cerebrospinal fluid mononuclear cells. We sought to broadly validate this clinical prediction rule in children with meningitis undergoing evaluation for Lyme disease.</p><p><b>METHODS: </b>We performed a patient-level data meta-analysis of 2 prospective and 2 retrospective cohorts of children ≤21 years of age with cerebrospinal fluid pleocytosis who underwent evaluation for Lyme disease. We defined a case of Lyme meningitis with a positive 2-tier serology result (positive or equivocal first-tier enzyme immunoassay followed by a positive supplemental immunoblot). We applied the Rule of 7's and report the accuracy for the identification of Lyme meningitis.</p><p><b>RESULTS: </b>Of 721 included children with meningitis, 178 had Lyme meningitis (24.7%) and 543 had aseptic meningitis (75.3%). The pooled data from the 4 studies showed the Rule of 7's has a sensitivity of 98% [95% confidence interval (CI): 89%-100%, I2 = 71%], specificity 40% (95% CI: 30%-50%, I2 = 75%), and a negative predictive value of 100% (95% CI: 95%-100%, I2 = 55%).</p><p><b>CONCLUSIONS: </b>The Rule of 7's accurately identified children with meningitis at low-risk for Lyme meningitis for whom clinicians should consider outpatient management while awaiting Lyme disease test results.</p>

DOI

10.1097/INF.0000000000003003

Alternate Title

Pediatr Infect Dis J

PMID

33710975

Title

Frequency and Risk Factors of Acute Kidney Injury During Diabetic Ketoacidosis in Children and Association With Neurocognitive Outcomes.

Year of Publication

2020

Number of Pages

e2025481

Date Published

2020 Dec 01

ISSN Number

2574-3805

Abstract

<p><strong>Importance: </strong>Acute kidney injury (AKI) occurs commonly during diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) in children, but the underlying mechanisms and associations are unclear.</p>

<p><strong>Objective: </strong>To investigate risk factors for AKI and its association with neurocognitive outcomes in pediatric DKA.</p>

<p><strong>Design, Setting, and Participants: </strong>This cohort study was a secondary analysis of data from the Pediatric Emergency Care Applied Research Network Fluid Therapies Under Investigation in DKA Study, a prospective, multicenter, randomized clinical trial comparing fluid protocols for pediatric DKA in 13 US hospitals. Included DKA episodes occurred among children age younger than 18 years with blood glucose 300 mg/dL or greater and venous pH less than 7.25 or serum bicarbonate level less than 15 mEq/L.</p>

<p><strong>Exposures: </strong>DKA requiring intravenous insulin therapy.</p>

<p><strong>Main Outcomes and Measures: </strong>AKI occurrence and stage were assessed using serum creatinine measurements using Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes criteria. DKA episodes with and without AKI were compared using univariable and multivariable methods, exploring associated factors.</p>

<p><strong>Results: </strong>Among 1359 DKA episodes (mean [SD] patient age, 11.6 [4.1] years; 727 [53.5%] girls; 651 patients [47.9%] with new-onset diabetes), AKI occurred in 584 episodes (43%; 95% CI, 40%-46%). A total of 252 AKI events (43%; 95% CI, 39%-47%) were stage 2 or 3. Multivariable analyses identified older age (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] per 1 year, 1.05; 95% CI, 1.00-1.09; P = .03), higher initial serum urea nitrogen (AOR per 1 mg/dL increase, 1.14; 95% CI, 1.11-1.18; P &lt; .001), higher heart rate (AOR for 1-SD increase in z-score, 1.20; 95% CI, 1.09-1.32; P &lt; .001), higher glucose-corrected sodium (AOR per 1 mEq/L increase, 1.03; 95% CI, 1.00-1.06; P = .001) and glucose concentrations (AOR per 100 mg/dL increase, 1.19; 95% CI, 1.07-1.32; P = .001), and lower pH (AOR per 0.1 increase, 0.63; 95% CI, 0.51-0.78; P &lt; .001) as variables associated with AKI. Children with AKI, compared with those without, had lower scores on tests of short-term memory during DKA (mean [SD] digit span recall: 6.8 [2.4] vs 7.6 [2.2]; P = .02) and lower mean (SD) IQ scores 3 to 6 months after recovery from DKA (100.0 [12.2] vs 103.5 [13.2]; P = .005). Differences persisted after adjusting for DKA severity and demographic factors, including socioeconomic status.</p>

<p><strong>Conclusions and Relevance: </strong>These findings suggest that AKI may occur more frequently in children with greater acidosis and circulatory volume depletion during DKA and may be part of a pattern of multiple organ injury involving the kidneys and brain.</p>

DOI

10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2020.25481

Alternate Title

JAMA Netw Open

PMID

33275152

Title

Pediatric Lyme Disease Biobank, United States, 2015-2020.

Year of Publication

2020

Number of Pages

3099-3101

Date Published

2020 Dec

ISSN Number

1080-6059

Abstract

<p>In 2015, we founded Pedi Lyme Net, a pediatric Lyme disease research network comprising 8 emergency departments in the United States. Of 2,497 children evaluated at 1 of these sites for Lyme disease, 515 (20.6%) were infected. This network is a unique resource for evaluating new approaches for diagnosing Lyme disease in children.</p>

DOI

10.3201/eid2612.200920

Alternate Title

Emerg Infect Dis

PMID

33219811

Title

Cognitive Function Following Diabetic Ketoacidosis in Children With New-Onset or Previously Diagnosed Type 1 Diabetes.

Year of Publication

2020

Date Published

2020 Sep 22

ISSN Number

1935-5548

Abstract

<p><strong>OBJECTIVE: </strong>This study assessed whether a single diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) episode is associated with cognitive declines in children with newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes and whether the same is true in children who had previously been diagnosed after accounting for variations in glycemic control and other relevant factors.</p>

<p><strong>RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: </strong>We prospectively enrolled 758 children, 6-18 years old, who presented with DKA in a randomized multisite clinical trial evaluating intravenous fluid protocols for DKA treatment. DKA was moderate/severe in 430 children and mild in 328 children. A total of 392 children with DKA had new onset of type 1 diabetes, and the rest were previously diagnosed. Neurocognitive assessment occurred 2-6 months after the DKA episode. A comparison group of 376 children with type 1 diabetes, but no DKA exposure, was also enrolled.</p>

<p><strong>RESULTS: </strong>Among all patients, moderate/severe DKA was associated with lower intelligence quotient (IQ) (β = -0.12, &lt; 0.001), item-color recall (β = -0.08, = 0.010), and forward digit span (β = -0.06, = 0.04). Among newly diagnosed patients, moderate/severe DKA was associated with lower item-color recall (β = -0.08, = 0.04). Among previously diagnosed patients, repeated DKA exposure and higher HbA were independently associated with lower IQ (β = -0.10 and β = -0.09, respectively, &lt; 0.01) and higher HbA was associated with lower item-color recall (β = -0.10, = 0.007) after hypoglycemia, diabetes duration, and socioeconomic status were accounted for.</p>

<p><strong>CONCLUSIONS: </strong>A single DKA episode is associated with subtle memory declines soon after type 1 diabetes diagnosis. Sizable IQ declines are detectable in children with known diabetes, suggesting that DKA effects may be exacerbated in children with chronic exposure to hyperglycemia.</p>

DOI

10.2337/dc20-0187

Alternate Title

Diabetes Care

PMID

32962981

Title

Hypertension During Diabetic Ketoacidosis in Children.

Year of Publication

2020

Date Published

2020 May 06

ISSN Number

1097-6833

Abstract

<p><strong>OBJECTIVES: </strong>To characterize hemodynamic alterations occurring during diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) in a large cohort of children and to identify clinical and biochemical factors associated with hypertension.</p>

<p><strong>STUDY DESIGN: </strong>This was a planned secondary analysis of data from the Pediatric Emergency Care Applied Research Network (PECARN) Fluid Therapies Under Investigation in DKA (FLUID) Study, a randomized clinical trial of fluid resuscitation protocols for children in DKA. Hemodynamic data (heart rate, blood pressure) from children with DKA were assessed in comparison with normal values for age and sex. Multivariable statistical modeling was used to explore clinical and laboratory predictors of hypertension.</p>

<p><strong>RESULTS: </strong>Among 1258 DKA episodes, hypertension was documented at presentation in 154 (12.2%) and developed during DKA treatment in an additional 196 (15.6%), resulting in a total of 350 DKA episodes (27.8%) in which hypertension occurred at some time. Factors associated with hypertension at presentation included more severe acidosis, (lower pH and lower PCO), and stage 2 or 3 Acute Kidney Injury (AKI). More severe acidosis and lower Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) scores were associated with hypertension occurring at any time during DKA treatment.</p>

<p><strong>CONCLUSIONS: </strong>Despite dehydration, hypertension occurs in a substantial number of children with DKA. Factors associated with hypertension include greater severity of acidosis, lower PCO and lower GCS scores during DKA treatment, suggesting that hypertension might be centrally mediated.</p>

DOI

10.1016/j.jpeds.2020.04.066

Alternate Title

J. Pediatr.

PMID

32387716

Title

Performance of the Modified Boston and Philadelphia Criteria for Invasive Bacterial Infections.

Year of Publication

2020

Date Published

2020 Mar 23

ISSN Number

1098-4275

Abstract

<p><strong>BACKGROUND: </strong>The ability of the decades-old Boston and Philadelphia criteria to accurately identify infants at low risk for serious bacterial infections has not been recently reevaluated.</p>

<p><strong>METHODS: </strong>We assembled a multicenter cohort of infants 29 to 60 days of age who had cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and blood cultures obtained. We report the performance of the modified Boston criteria (peripheral white blood cell count [WBC] ≥20 000 cells per mm, CSF WBC ≥10 cells per mm, and urinalysis with &gt;10 WBC per high-power field or positive urine dip result) and modified Philadelphia criteria (peripheral WBC ≥15 000 cells per mm, CSF WBC ≥8 cells per mm, positive CSF Gram-stain result, and urinalysis with &gt;10 WBC per high-power field or positive urine dip result) for the identification of invasive bacterial infections (IBIs). We defined IBI as bacterial meningitis (growth of pathogenic bacteria from CSF culture) or bacteremia (growth from blood culture).</p>

<p><strong>RESULTS: </strong>We applied the modified Boston criteria to 8344 infants and the modified Philadelphia criteria to 8131 infants. The modified Boston criteria identified 133 of the 212 infants with IBI (sensitivity 62.7% [95% confidence interval (CI) 55.9% to 69.3%] and specificity 59.2% [95% CI 58.1% to 60.2%]), and the modified Philadelphia criteria identified 157 of the 219 infants with IBI (sensitivity 71.7% [95% CI 65.2% to 77.6%] and specificity 46.1% [95% CI 45.0% to 47.2%]). The modified Boston and Philadelphia criteria misclassified 17 of 53 (32.1%) and 13 of 56 (23.3%) infants with bacterial meningitis, respectively.</p>

<p><strong>CONCLUSIONS: </strong>The modified Boston and Philadelphia criteria misclassified a substantial number of infants 29 to 60 days old with IBI, including those with bacterial meningitis.</p>

DOI

10.1542/peds.2019-3538

Alternate Title

Pediatrics

PMID

32205466

Title

The Lyme Disease Polymerase Chain Reaction Test Has Low Sensitivity.

Year of Publication

2019

Date Published

2019 Dec 10

ISSN Number

1557-7759

Abstract

<p>The Lyme PCR is a direct detection test, but has not been rigorously evaluated in children undergoing evaluation for acute Lyme disease. We performed a six-center prospective cohort study of children aged 1 to 21 years undergoing acute evaluation for Lyme disease. For this planned secondary analysis, we limited our cohort to children undergoing evaluation for Lyme disease who had any Lyme PCR test obtained by a treating clinician (blood, synovial fluid, or cerebrospinal fluid). We defined a case of Lyme disease with a positive two-tier Lyme disease serology: a positive or equivocal enzyme immunoassay followed by a positive supplemental immunoblot interpreted using standard criteria. We report the test characteristics of Lyme PCR for the diagnosis of Lyme disease. We identified 124 children of whom 54 (43.5%) had Lyme disease. Overall, 23 had a positive PCR test (sensitivity 41.8%; 95% confidence interval [CI] 29.7-55.0; specificity 100%, 95% CI: 94.2-100). All children with a positive Lyme PCR also had a positive two-tiered Lyme disease serology. The Lyme disease PCR test did not improve the diagnosis of children undergoing evaluation for acute Lyme disease. Given the additional costs of this low utility test, clinicians should not order Lyme PCR testing in the acute care setting.</p>

DOI

10.1089/vbz.2019.2547

Alternate Title

Vector Borne Zoonotic Dis.

PMID

31821110

Title

Diagnostic Performance of C6 Enzyme Immunoassay for Lyme Arthritis.

Year of Publication

2019

Date Published

2019 Dec 13

ISSN Number

1098-4275

Abstract

<p><strong>OBJECTIVES: </strong>In Lyme disease endemic areas, initial management of children with arthritis can be challenging because diagnostic tests take several days to return results, leading to potentially unnecessary invasive procedures. Our objective was to examine the role of the C6 peptide enzyme immunoassay (EIA) test to guide initial management.</p>

<p><strong>METHODS: </strong>We enrolled children with acute arthritis undergoing evaluation for Lyme disease presenting to a participating Pedi Lyme Net emergency department (2015-2019) and performed a C6 EIA test. We defined Lyme arthritis with a positive or equivocal C6 EIA test result followed by a positive supplemental immunoblot result and defined septic arthritis as a positive synovial fluid culture result or a positive blood culture result with synovial fluid pleocytosis. Otherwise, children were considered to have inflammatory arthritis. We report the sensitivity and specificity of the C6 EIA for the diagnosis of Lyme arthritis.</p>

<p><strong>RESULTS: </strong>Of the 911 study patients, 211 children (23.2%) had Lyme arthritis, 11 (1.2%) had septic arthritis, and 689 (75.6%) had other inflammatory arthritis. A positive or equivocal C6 EIA result had a sensitivity of 100% (211 out of 211; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 98.2%-100%) and specificity of 94.2% (661 out of 700; 95% CI: 92.5%-95.9%) for Lyme arthritis. None of the 250 children with a positive or equivocal C6 EIA result had septic arthritis (0%; 95% CI: 0%-1.5%), although 75 children underwent diagnostic arthrocentesis and 27 underwent operative joint washout.</p>

<p><strong>CONCLUSIONS: </strong>In Lyme disease endemic areas, a C6 EIA result could be used to guide initial clinical decision-making, without misclassifying children with septic arthritis.</p>

DOI

10.1542/peds.2019-0593

Alternate Title

Pediatrics

PMID

31836615

Title

Higher C6 enzyme immunoassay index values correlate with a diagnosis of noncutaneous Lyme disease.

Year of Publication

2019

Number of Pages

160-164

Date Published

2019 Jun

ISSN Number

1879-0070

Abstract

<p>The correlation between the Food and Drug Administration-cleared C6 enzyme immunoassay (EIA) C6 index values and a diagnosis of Lyme disease has not been examined. We used pooled patient-level data from 5 studies of adults and children with Lyme disease and control subjects who were tested with the C6 EIA. We constructed a receiver operating characteristic curve using regression clustered by study and measured the area under the curve (AUC) to examine the accuracy of the C6 index values in differentiating between patients with noncutaneous Lyme disease and control subjects. In the 4821 included patients, the C6 index value had excellent ability to distinguish between patients with noncutaneous Lyme disease and control subjects [AUC 0.99; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.99-1.00]. An index value cut point of ≥3.0 had a sensitivity of 90.9% (95% CI, 87.8-93.3) and specificity of 99.0% (95% CI, 98.6-99.2%) for Lyme disease.</p>

DOI

10.1016/j.diagmicrobio.2018.12.001

Alternate Title

Diagn. Microbiol. Infect. Dis.

PMID

30642722

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