First name
Lauren
Last name
Satchell

Title

Dodging the bundle-Persistent healthcare-associated rhinovirus infection throughout the pandemic.

Year of Publication

2022

Number of Pages

1140-1144

Date Published

05/2022

ISSN Number

1527-3296

Abstract

INTRODUCTION: Healthcare-associated viral infections (HAVI) are a common cause of patient harm in the pediatric population. We implemented a HAVI prevention bundle in 2015, which included 6 core elements: caregiver screening, symptom-based isolation, personal protective equipment (PPE), hand hygiene, staff illness procedures, and monitoring of environmental cleanliness. Enhanced bundle elements were introduced at the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, which provided an opportunity to observe the effectiveness of the bundle with optimal adherence to prevention practices, and to measure the impact on respiratory HAVI epidemiology.

METHODS: Respiratory HAVIs were confirmed through review of medical records and application of the National Health Safety Network (NHSN) surveillance criteria for upper respiratory infections (URIs) with predetermined incubation periods for unit attribution. Descriptive statistics of the study population were examined, and comparative analyses were performed on demographic and process metrics. Data analysis was conducted using R statistical software.

RESULTS: We observed an overall decrease in respiratory HAVI of 68%, with prepandemic rates of 0.19 infections per 1,000 patient significantly decreased to a rate of 0.06 per 1,000 patient days in the pandemic period (P < .01). Rhinovirus made up proportionally more of our respiratory HAVI in the pandemic period (64% vs 53%), with respiratory HAVI secondary only to rhinovirus identified during 8 of 16 months in the pandemic period. Compliance with our HAVI prevention bundle significantly improved during pandemic period.

CONCLUSIONS: Enhancement of our HAVI bundle during the COVID-19 pandemic contributed toward significant reduction in nosocomial transmission of respiratory HAVI. Even with prevention practices optimized, respiratory HAVIs secondary to rhinovirus continued to be reported, likely due to the capacity of rhinovirus to evade bundle elements in hospital, and infection prevention efforts at large in the community, leaving vulnerable patients at continued risk.

DOI

10.1016/j.ajic.2022.04.016

Alternate Title

Am J Infect Control

PMID

35588914

Title

The power of feedback: Implementing a comprehensive hand hygiene observer program.

Year of Publication

2022

Date Published

06/2022

ISSN Number

1527-3296

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Hand hygiene (HH) is a fundamental component of infection prevention within all healthcare settings. We implemented a hospital-wide program built on overt HH observation, real-time feedback, and thematic analysis of HH misses.

METHODS: A robust observer training program was established to include foundational training in the WHO's My Five Moments of HH. Observational data from 2011 to 2019 were analyzed by unit, provider type, and thematic analyses of misses.

RESULTS: During the study period, we conducted 160,917 hospital-wide observations on 29 units (monthly average of 1,490 observations). Institutional compliance remained above 95% from 2013 to 2019. Thematic analysis revealed "touching self" and "touching phone" as common, institution-wide reasons for HH misses.

DISCUSSION: Overt observations facilitated communication between HH program and healthcare staff to better understand workflow and educate staff on HH opportunities. This program is an integral part of the Infection Prevention team and has been deployed to collect supplemental data during clusters and outbreaks investigations.

CONCLUSIONS: In addition to having rich HH data, successes of this program, include increased awareness of IPC practices, enhanced communication about patient safety, enriched dialog and feedback around HH misses, and relationship building among program observers, unit staff and leaders.

DOI

10.1016/j.ajic.2022.06.003

Alternate Title

Am J Infect Control

PMID

35691447

Title

Implementation of a Mandatory Influenza Vaccine Policy: A 10-Year Experience.

Year of Publication

2020

Date Published

2020 Jun 17

ISSN Number

1537-6591

Abstract

<p><strong>BACKGROUND: </strong>Influenza vaccination of healthcare workers (HCWs) has been recommended for more than 30 years. In 2009, HCWs were designated as a priority group by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Current HCW vaccination rates are 78% across all settings and reach approximately 92% among those employed in hospital settings. Over the last decade, it has become clear that mandatory vaccine policies result in maximal rates of HCW immunization.</p>

<p><strong>METHODS: </strong>In this observational 10-year study, we describe the implementation of a mandatory influenza vaccination policy in a dedicated quaternary pediatric hospital setting by a multidisciplinary team. We analyzed 10 years of available data from deidentified occupational health records from 2009-2010 through the 2018-2019 influenza seasons. Descriptive statistics were performed using Stata v15 and Excel.</p>

<p><strong>RESULTS: </strong>Sustained increases in HCW immunization rates above 99% were observed in the 10 years postimplementation, in addition to a reduction in exemption requests and healthcare-associated influenza. In the year of implementation, 145 (1.6%) HCWs were placed on temporary suspension for failure to receive the vaccine without documentation of an exemption, with 9 (0.06%) subsequently being terminated. Since then, between 0 and 3 HCWs are terminated yearly for failure to receive the vaccine.</p>

<p><strong>CONCLUSIONS: </strong>Implementation of our mandatory influenza vaccination program succeeded in successfully increasing the proportion of immunized HCWs at a quaternary care children's hospital, reducing annual exemption requests with a small number of terminations secondary to vaccine refusal. Temporal trends suggest a positive impact on the safety of our patients.</p>

DOI

10.1093/cid/ciaa782

Alternate Title

Clin Infect Dis

PMID

33372217

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