First name
Lindsay
Last name
Berrigan

Title

Text Message Reminders for the Second Dose of Influenza Vaccine for Children: An RCT.

Year of Publication

2022

Date Published

08/2022

ISSN Number

1098-4275

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Among children requiring 2 influenza doses in a given season, second dose receipt nearly halves the odds of influenza. Nationally, many children do not receive both needed doses. This study sought to compare the effectiveness of text message reminders with embedded interactive educational information versus usual care on receipt and timeliness of the second dose of influenza vaccine.

METHODS: This trial took place over the 2017 to 2018 and 2018 to 2019 influenza seasons among 50 pediatric primary care offices across 24 states primarily from the American Academy of Pediatrics' Pediatric Research in Office Settings practice-based research network. Caregiver-child dyads of children 6 months to 8 years in need of a second influenza vaccination that season were individually randomized 1:1 into intervention versus usual care, stratified by age and language within each practice. Intervention caregivers received automated, personalized text messages, including educational information. Second dose receipt by April 30 (season end) and by day 42 (2 weeks after second dose due date) were assessed using Mantel Haenszel methods by practice and language. Analyses were intention to treat.

RESULTS: Among 2086 dyads enrolled, most children were 6 to 23 months and half publicly insured. Intervention children were more likely to receive a second dose by season end (83.8% versus 80.9%; adjusted risk difference (ARD) 3.8%; 95% confidence interval [0.1 to 7.5]) and day 42 (62.4% versus 55.7%; ARD 8.3% [3.6 to 13.0]).

CONCLUSIONS: In this large-scale trial of primary care pediatric practices across the United States, text message reminders were effective in promoting increased and timelier second dose influenza vaccine receipt.

DOI

10.1542/peds.2022-056967

Alternate Title

Pediatrics

PMID

35965283

Title

Vaccine hesitancy and influenza beliefs among parents of children requiring a second dose of influenza vaccine in a season: An American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) Pediatric Research in Office Settings (PROS) study.

Year of Publication

2020

Number of Pages

1-8

Date Published

2020 Feb 04

ISSN Number

2164-554X

Abstract

<p>To receive adequate protection against influenza, some children 6 months through 8 y old need two doses of influenza vaccine in a given season. Currently, only half of those receiving the first dose receive a second. Our objective was to assess vaccine hesitancy and influenza disease and vaccine knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs among caregivers of children who received the first of their two needed doses. As part of a national-randomized control trial of second dose text-message influenza vaccine reminders (2017-2018 season), a telephone survey collected caregiver and index child demographic information. Each child had received the first of two needed influenza vaccine doses. Caregivers completed a measure of general vaccine hesitancy - the five-question Parent Attitudes About Childhood Vaccines Survey Tool (PACV-5) - and questions about influenza infection and vaccine. We assessed associations between participant demographic characteristics, vaccine hesitancy, and influenza beliefs and calculated the standardized proportion of caregivers endorsing each outcome using logistic regression. Analyses included responses from 256 participants from 36 primary care practices in 24 states. Some caregivers (11.7%) reported moderate/high vaccine hesitancy and many had misperceptions about influenza disease and vaccine. In multivariable models, no single variable was consistently associated with inaccurate knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs. These results demonstrate that caregivers whose children received the first dose of influenza vaccine may still be vaccine hesitant and have inaccurate influenza beliefs. Pediatricians should consider broadly addressing inaccurate beliefs and promoting vaccination even after caregivers agree to the first dose.</p>

DOI

10.1080/21645515.2019.1707006

Alternate Title

Hum Vaccin Immunother

PMID

32017643

Title

Usability, Acceptability, and Impact of a Pediatric Teledermatology Mobile Health Application.

Year of Publication

2018

Number of Pages

236-45

Date Published

2018 Mar

ISSN Number

1556-3669

Abstract

<p><strong>OBJECTIVE: </strong>Pediatric dermatology appointment wait times often exceed several months. We evaluated the usability, acceptability, and clinical impact of a store-and-forward teledermatology mobile application (app) linking families with pediatric dermatologists.</p>

<p><strong>METHODS: </strong>Parents of children age 6 weeks to 17 years or individuals 18-21 years old were invited (by e-mail or referral) to participate in this single group, prospective study. Within the app, users photographed the skin condition, answered questions, and submitted their case for review. One pediatric dermatologist viewed cases, diagnosed conditions, and provided instructions and prescriptions. User surveys immediately following app use and 1 week later, supplemented by electronic logs, assessed usability, acceptability, and impact.</p>

<p><strong>RESULTS: </strong>One hundred ninety-seven parents and one adolescent submitted cases within 39 days of invitation. App users were more likely to be white than those in the population invited (67% vs. 34%, p &lt; 0.001) and their children were slightly younger (mean 7.3 vs. 9.0 years, p &lt; 0.001). A majority, 83% found the app easy to use, 97% felt that submitting a case took "the right amount of time," 87% were satisfied, and 93% would use the app again. Prescription receipt was associated with increased app satisfaction (p = 0.008). The median user received a response in 2.8 h (interquartile range 1.1-6.4). Had the app been unavailable, 44% reported that they would have waited for primary care, 32% for a dermatology appointment, and 7% would have gone to an urgent care clinic.</p>

<p><strong>CONCLUSIONS: </strong>A mobile health app allowing families to directly consult a pediatric dermatologist was usable, acceptable, and expedited care.</p>

DOI

10.1089/tmj.2017.0075

Alternate Title

Telemed J E Health

PMID

28731848

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