First name
Marisa
Last name
Klein-Gitelman

Title

The Effect of Psychiatric Comorbidity on Healthcare Utilization for Youth With Newly Diagnosed Systemic Lupus Erythematosus.

Year of Publication

2023

Number of Pages

204-212

Date Published

02/2023

ISSN Number

0315-162X

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To examine the effect of psychiatric diagnoses on healthcare use in youth with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) during their first year of SLE care.

METHODS: We conducted a retrospective cohort study using claims from 2000 to 2013 from Clinformatics Data Mart (OptumInsight). Youth aged 10 years to 24 years with an incident diagnosis of SLE (≥ 3 International Classification of Diseases, 9th revision, codes for SLE 710.0, > 30 days apart) were categorized as having: (1) a preceding psychiatric diagnosis in the year before SLE diagnosis, (2) an incident psychiatric diagnosis in the year after SLE diagnosis, or (3) no psychiatric diagnosis. We compared ambulatory, emergency, and inpatient visits in the year after SLE diagnosis, stratified by nonpsychiatric and psychiatric visits. We examined the effect of childhood-onset vs adult-onset SLE by testing for an interaction between age and psychiatric exposure on outcome.

RESULTS: We identified 650 youth with an incident diagnosis of SLE, of which 122 (19%) had a preceding psychiatric diagnosis and 105 (16%) had an incident psychiatric diagnosis. Compared with those without a psychiatric diagnosis, youth with SLE and a preceding or incident psychiatric diagnosis had more healthcare use across both ambulatory and emergency settings for both nonpsychiatric and psychiatric-related care. These associations were minimally affected by age at time of SLE diagnosis.

CONCLUSION: Psychiatric comorbidity is common among youth with newly diagnosed SLE and is associated with greater healthcare use. Interventions to address preceding and incident psychiatric comorbidity may decrease healthcare burden for youth with SLE.

DOI

10.3899/jrheum.220052

Alternate Title

J Rheumatol

PMID

36109077

Title

Pilot study comparing the Childhood Arthritis & Rheumatology Research Alliance (CARRA) systemic Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis Consensus Treatment Plans.

Year of Publication

2017

Number of Pages

23

Date Published

2017 Apr 11

ISSN Number

1546-0096

Abstract

<p><strong>OBJECTIVES: </strong>To assess the feasibility of studying the comparative effectiveness of the Childhood Arthritis and Rheumatology Research Alliance (CARRA) consensus treatment plans (CTPs) for systemic Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA) using an observational registry.</p>

<p><strong>METHODS: </strong>Untreated systemic JIA patients enrolled in the CARRA Registry were begun on one of 4 CTPs chosen by the treating physician and patient/family (glucocorticoid [GC] alone; methotrexate [MTX] ± GC; IL1 inhibitor [IL1i] ± GC; IL6 inhibitor [IL6i] ± GC). The primary outcome of clinical inactive disease (CID) without current GC use was assessed at 9&nbsp;months.</p>

<p><strong>TRIAL REGISTRATION: </strong>clinicaltrials.gov NCT01697254; first registered 9/28/12 (retrospectively enrolled).</p>

<p><strong>RESULTS: </strong>Thirty patients were enrolled at 13 sites; eight patients were started on a non-biologic CTP (2 GC, 6 MTX) and 22 patients on a biologic CTP (12 IL1i, 10 IL6i) at disease onset. Demographic and disease features were similar between CTP groups. CTP choice appeared to segregate by site preference. CID off GC was achieved by 37% (11 of 30) including 11/22 (50%) starting a biologic CTP compared to 0/8 starting a non-biologic CTP (p = 0.014). There were four serious adverse events: two infections, one appendicitis and one macrophage activation syndrome.</p>

<p><strong>CONCLUSIONS: </strong>The CARRA systemic JIA CTP pilot study demonstrated successful implementation of CTPs using the CARRA registry infrastructure. Having demonstrated feasibility, a larger study using CTP response to better determine the relative effectiveness of treatments for new-onset systemic JIA is now underway.</p>

DOI

10.1186/s12969-017-0157-1

Alternate Title

Pediatr Rheumatol Online J

PMID

28399931

WATCH THIS PAGE

Subscription is not available for this page.