First name
Sarosh
Middle name
P
Last name
Batlivala

Title

Comparison of management strategies for neonates with symptomatic tetralogy of Fallot and weight <2.5 kg.

Year of Publication

2021

Date Published

2021 Feb 03

ISSN Number

1097-685X

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To compare management strategies for neonates <2.5 kg with tetralogy of Fallot and symptomatic cyanosis who either undergo staged repair (SR) (initial palliation followed by later complete repair) or primary repair (PR).

METHODS: Consecutive neonates with tetralogy of Fallot and symptomatic cyanosis weighing <2.5 kg at initial intervention and between 2005 and 2017 were retrospectively reviewed from the Congenital Cardiac Research Collaborative. Primary outcome was mortality and secondary outcomes included component (eg, initial palliation, complete repair, or primary repair) and cumulative (SR: initial palliation followed by later complete repair) hospital and intensive care unit lengths of stay, durations of ventilation, inotrope use, cardiopulmonary bypass time, procedural complications, and reintervention. Outcomes were compared with propensity score adjustments with PR as the reference group.

RESULTS: The cohort included 76 SR (initial palliation: 53 surgical and 23 transcatheter) and 44 PR patients. The observed risk of overall mortality was similar between SR and PR groups (15.8% vs 18.2%: P = .735). The adjusted hazard of mortality remained similar between groups overall (hazard ratio, 0.59; 95% confidence interval, 0.26-1.36; P = .214), as well as during short-term (<4 months: hazard ratio, 0.37; 95% confidence interval, 0.13-1.09; P = .071) and midterm (>4 months: hazard ratio, 1.32; 95% confidence interval, 0.30-5.79; P = .717) follow-up. Reintervention in the first 18 months was common in both groups (53.2% vs 48.4%; hazard ratio, 1.69; 95% confidence interval, 0.96-2.28; P = .072). Adjusted procedural complications and neonatal morbidity burden were overall lower in the SR group. Cumulative secondary outcome burdens largely favored the PR group.

CONCLUSIONS: In this study comparing SR and PR treatment strategies for neonates with tetralogy of Fallot and symptomatic cyanosis and weight <2.5 kg, mortality and reintervention burden was highly independent of treatment strategy. Other potential advantages were observed with each approach.

DOI

10.1016/j.jtcvs.2021.01.100

Alternate Title

J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg

PMID

33726912

Title

Comparison of Management Strategies for Neonates With Symptomatic Tetralogy of Fallot.

Year of Publication

2021

Number of Pages

1093-1106

Date Published

2021 Mar 02

ISSN Number

1558-3597

Abstract

<p><strong>BACKGROUND: </strong>Neonates with tetralogy of Fallot and symptomatic cyanosis (sTOF) require early intervention.</p>

<p><strong>OBJECTIVES: </strong>This study sought to perform a balanced multicenter comparison of staged repair (SR) (initial palliation [IP] and subsequent complete repair [CR]) versus primary repair (PR) treatment strategies.</p>

<p><strong>METHODS: </strong>Consecutive neonates with sTOF who underwent IP or PR at&nbsp;≤30&nbsp;days of age from 2005 to 2017 were retrospectively reviewed from the Congenital Cardiac Research Collaborative. The primary outcome was death. Secondary outcomes included component (IP, CR, PR) and cumulative (SR): hospital and intensive care unit lengths of stay; durations of cardiopulmonary bypass, anesthesia, ventilation, and inotrope use; and complication and reintervention rates. Outcomes were compared using propensity score adjustment.</p>

<p><strong>RESULTS: </strong>The cohort consisted of 342 patients who underwent SR (IP: surgical, n&nbsp;=&nbsp;256; transcatheter, n&nbsp;=&nbsp;86) and 230 patients who underwent PR. Pre-procedural ventilation, prematurity, DiGeorge syndrome, and pulmonary atresia were more common in the SR group (p&nbsp;≤0.01). The observed risk of death was not different between the groups (10.2% vs 7.4%; p&nbsp;=&nbsp;0.25) at median 4.3 years. After adjustment, the hazard of death remained similar between groups (hazard ratio: 0.82; 95% confidence interval: 0.49 to 1.38; p&nbsp;=&nbsp;0.456), but it favored SR during early follow-up (&lt;4&nbsp;months; p&nbsp;=&nbsp;0.041). Secondary outcomes favored the SR group in component analysis, whereas they largely favored PR in cumulative analysis. Reintervention risk was higher in the SR group (p&nbsp;=&nbsp;0.002).</p>

<p><strong>CONCLUSIONS: </strong>In this multicenter comparison of SR or PR for management of neonates with sTOF, adjusted for patient-related factors, early mortality and neonatal morbidity were lower in the SR group, but cumulative morbidity and reinterventions favored the PR group, findings suggesting potential benefits to each strategy.</p>

DOI

10.1016/j.jacc.2020.12.048

Alternate Title

J Am Coll Cardiol

PMID

33632484

Title

The Effect of Radiation Shields on Operator Exposure During Congenital Cardiac Catheterisation.

Year of Publication

2016

Number of Pages

520-526

Date Published

2016 Dec

ISSN Number

1742-3406

Abstract

<p>Cardiac catheterisation personnel are exposed to occupational radiation and its health risks. Little data exist regarding the efficacy of radiation-protective equipment from congenital catheterisation laboratories (CLs). The authors retrospectively reviewed data in which CL operators wore a radiation dosemeter during catheterizations on patients of &gt;20 kg. A leaded under-table skirt was present in all cases. Three additional radiation-protective devices were utilised at operator discretion: a top extension to the under-table skirt, a ceiling-mounted shield and a disposable patient drape. Case details, operator position, fluoroscopy time, incident air KERMA in the patient plane (K, mGy) and dose-area product (DAP, µGy·m(2)) were recorded. A total of 136 catheterizations over 8 months were included. Median operator dose (OpD) was 12 µSv (range 0-930) and indexed to K and DAP to correct for patient factors and case times. Indexed OpD decreased significantly with each additional shield used (14.8 vs. 1.3 nSv µGy(-1) m(-2) and 124 vs. 14 nSv mGy(-1) with one and four shields, respectively, p &lt; 0.001). This trend was not significant with operator at head-of-bed. Combinations that included the ceiling shield had the lowest indexed OpD. The patient drape did not further reduce OpD when all other shields were used (1.3 vs. 2.2 nSv µGy(-1) m(-2), p = 0.5; 14 vs. 17 nSv mGy(-1), p = 0.4) and was associated with higher patient exposure indexed to weight and fluoroscopy time (4.5 vs. 3.1 µGy m(2) kg-min(-1), p = 0.009; and 0.51 vs. 0.38 mGy kg-min(-1), p = 0.01). Supplemental radiation barriers can decrease operator-absorbed radiation. A ceiling-mounted shield may provide greatest benefit. The authors do not recommend routine use of disposable patient drapes.</p>

DOI

10.1093/rpd/ncv471

Alternate Title

Radiat Prot Dosimetry

PMID

26582175

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