First name
Ontibile
Last name
Tshume

Title

Test-Retest Reliability of a Computerized Neurocognitive Battery in School-Age Children with HIV in Botswana.

Year of Publication

2022

Date Published

08/2022

ISSN Number

1873-5843

Abstract

Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is prevalent among children and adolescents in Botswana, but standardized neurocognitive testing is limited. The Penn Computerized Neurocognitive Battery (PennCNB) attempts to streamline evaluation of neurocognitive functioning and has been culturally adapted for use among youth in this high-burden, low-resource setting. However, its reliability across measurements (i.e., test-retest reliability) is unknown. This study examined the test-retest reliability of the culturally adapted PennCNB in 65 school-age children (age 7-17) living with HIV in Botswana. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) for PennCNB summary scores (ICCs > 0.80) and domain scores (ICCs = 0.66-0.88) were higher than those for individual tests, which exhibited more variability (ICCs = 0.50-0.82), with the lowest reliability on memory tests. Practice effects were apparent on some measures, especially within memory and complex cognition domains. Taken together, the adapted PennCNB exhibited adequate test-retest reliability at the domain level but variable reliability for individual tests. Differences in reliability should be considered in implementation of these tests.

DOI

10.1093/arclin/acac066

Alternate Title

Arch Clin Neuropsychol

PMID

35988538

Title

Building a Community Based Mental Health Program for Adolescents in Botswana: Stakeholder Feedback.

Year of Publication

2021

Date Published

2021 Nov 26

ISSN Number

1573-2789

Abstract

<p><strong>BACKGROUND: </strong>When planning interventions for adolescents, adult interventions should not be used 'as is' in youth settings. Stakeholder engagement can help understand the overall adolescent mental health ecosystem and adapt existing evidence-based interventions for the youth.</p>

<p><strong>OBJECTIVE: </strong>To understand the overall mental health needs of adolescents in Botswana and the necessary adaptations required for an adolescent lay counselor based intervention in the country.</p>

<p><strong>METHODS: </strong>We used the theory of change model and the nominal group technique in five stakeholder meetings. Meetings were held to discuss the mental health needs of youth in Botswana and identify priorities for a lay counsellor based intervention modelled after the Friendship Bench intervention, an existing mental health intervention for adults.</p>

<p><strong>RESULTS: </strong>The root causes of mental health problems among Botswana's youth identified by stakeholders included limited mental health knowledge among the youth and the community, family problems, poor communication, low self-esteem, the rapid growth of technology, and biological/genetic predisposition. Structurally barriers included: mental illness-related stigma, lack of psychosocial support, incomplete follow up for health services, cultural beliefs about mental illness, and fragmented mental health services. The stakeholders envisage a program that could empower adolescents and youth counselors to address mental health concerns for a healthier community. The group identified and prioritized several key elements of an effective lay counselor intervention.</p>

<p><strong>CONCLUSIONS: </strong>A diverse group of community stakeholders can illustrate critical mental health needs and elements that countries could use to adapt and contextualize a lay counsellor based mental health intervention for new populations such as the youth.</p>

DOI

10.1007/s10597-021-00915-5

Alternate Title

Community Ment Health J

PMID

34826035

Title

Medical stakeholder perspectives on implementing a computerized battery to identify neurocognitive impairments among youth in Botswana.

Year of Publication

2021

Number of Pages

1-9

Date Published

2021 Oct 18

ISSN Number

1360-0451

Abstract

<p>HIV infection and exposure, common in Sub-Saharan Africa, are associated with pediatric neurocognitive impairment. Cognitive screening can identify impairments, but it is rarely used in this setting. The Penn Computerized Neurocognitive Battery (PennCNB), an evidence-based cognitive screening tool, was adapted for use in Botswana. To facilitate future implementation, 20 semi-structured interviews were conducted to elicit key stakeholders' perspectives on factors likely to be related to successful uptake of the PennCNB in clinical settings. An integrated analytic approach combining constructs from the Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research and modified grounded theory was used. Results underscore the need for cognitive screening in Botswana and the acceptability of the PennCNB. Implementation barriers include limited time and resources, whereas facilitators include standard procedures for introducing new tools into medical settings and for training implementers. Recommended implementation strategies include integrating screening into the existing workflow, implementing the tool in the medical and educational sectors, and targeting selection of children for assessment. This research addresses the research-to-practice gap by engaging in pre-implementation inquiry and designing for implementation. Results will inform the development of strategies to maximize the likelihood of successful implementation of the PennCNB to identify neurocognitive impairment in children in this high-need setting.</p>

DOI

10.1080/09540121.2021.1990202

Alternate Title

AIDS Care

PMID

34663144

Title

Structural validity of a computerized neurocognitive battery for youth affected by human immunodeficiency virus in Botswana.

Year of Publication

2021

Date Published

2021 Sep 13

ISSN Number

1939-134X

Abstract

<p>Children born to mothers infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) during pregnancy experience increased risk of neurocognitive impairment. In Botswana, HIV infection is common among youth, but standardized cognitive screening is limited. The Penn Computerized Neurocognitive Battery (PennCNB), a tool that streamlines evaluation of neurocognitive functioning, was culturally adapted for use among youth in this high-burden, low-resource setting. The present study examined the structural validity of the culturally adapted PennCNB. A cohort of 7-17-year-old children living with HIV (HIV +) and HIV-exposed-uninfected (HEU) children were enrolled from the Botswana-Baylor Children's Clinical Centre of Excellence in Gaborone, Botswana. Confirmatory and exploratory factor analyses were performed on speed, accuracy, and efficiency measures for 13 PennCNB tests. Fit of the confirmatory factor analysis was acceptable, which supports the design of the battery measuring four neurocognitive domains: Executive functioning, episodic memory, complex cognition, and sensorimotor/processing speed. However, the model revealed high interfactor correlation. Exploratory factor analysis suggested that tests assessing executive functioning and sensorimotor/processing speed clustered together rather than forming differentiable factors. Overall, this research provides valuable insight into the structural validity of a neurocognitive battery adapted for use in a non-Western setting, suggesting that the PennCNB could serve as a useful tool for the assessment of neurocognitive function in Botswana and, potentially, other resource-limited settings. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2021 APA, all rights reserved).</p>

DOI

10.1037/pas0001066

Alternate Title

Psychol Assess

PMID

34516163

Title

Reasons for discordance between antiretroviral adherence measures in adolescents.

Year of Publication

2021

Number of Pages

1-9

Date Published

2021 Aug 23

ISSN Number

1360-0451

Abstract

<p>Adolescents with suboptimal medication taking may deceive caregivers about non-adherence. We conducted a 5-year longitudinal study of adolescents monitored simultaneously with both easily manipulated (e.g., self-report) and hard to manipulate (e.g., microelectronic data) strategies. Adolescents with repeatedly high adherence on the former and low adherence on the latter were invited along with their parental figures ("parents") to participate. We conducted focus groups and semi-structured interviews, separately for adolescents and parents, to elucidate drivers of discordant measures. Forty-seven adolescents and 26 parents participated in focus groups and 4 adolescents were interviewed. Adolescents described hiding pills, discarding pills, and lying. Their motivations included fear of disappointing those who care about them, desire to avoid admonishment by parents and clinic staff, and desire to avoid remedial adherence counseling. Both adolescents and parents considered negative feedback for prior poor adherence to be key motivation to hide current poor adherence from clinic staff. Providing positive feedback for truth-telling, rather than for "evidence" of excellent adherence, might help adolescent patients and their parents to develop stronger treatment alliances with each other and with clinic staff. Such alliances would allow adherence interventions to be better targeted and more fruitful in increasing adherence.</p>

DOI

10.1080/09540121.2021.1968998

Alternate Title

AIDS Care

PMID

34424796

Title

Development of a computerised neurocognitive battery for children and adolescents with HIV in Botswana: study design and protocol for the Ntemoga study.

Year of Publication

2020

Number of Pages

e041099

Date Published

2020 Aug 26

ISSN Number

2044-6055

Abstract

<p><strong>INTRODUCTION: </strong>Neurodevelopmental delays and cognitive impairments are common in youth living with HIV. Unfortunately, in resource-limited settings, where HIV infection impacts millions of children, cognitive and neurodevelopmental disorders commonly go undetected because of a lack of appropriate assessment instruments and local expertise. Here, we present a protocol to culturally adapt and validate the Penn Computerized Neurocognitive Battery (PennCNB) and examine its validity for detecting both advanced and subtle neurodevelopmental problems among school-aged children affected by HIV in resource-limited settings.</p>

<p><strong>METHODS AND ANALYSIS: </strong>This is a prospective, observational cohort study. The venue for this study is Gaborone, Botswana, a resource-limited setting with high rates of perinatal exposure to HIV and limited neurocognitive assessment tools and expertise. We aim to validate the PennCNB in this setting by culturally adapting and then administering the adapted version of the battery to 200 HIV-infected, 200 HIV-exposed uninfected and 240 HIV-unexposed uninfected children. A series of analyses will be conducted to examine the reliability and construct validity of the PennCNB in these populations.</p>

<p><strong>ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: </strong>This project received ethical approval from local and university Institutional Review Boards and involved extensive input from local stakeholders. If successful, the proposed tools will provide practical screening and streamlined, comprehensive assessments that could be implemented in resource-limited settings to identify children with cognitive deficits within programmes focused on the care and treatment of children affected by HIV. The utility of such assessments could also extend beyond children affected by HIV, increasing general access to paediatric cognitive assessments in resource-limited settings.</p>

DOI

10.1136/bmjopen-2020-041099

Alternate Title

BMJ Open

PMID

32847928

Title

Psychological Reactance is a Novel Risk Factor for Adolescent Antiretroviral Treatment Failure.

Year of Publication

2020

Date Published

2020 Aug 04

ISSN Number

1573-3254

Abstract

<p>Psychological reactance is an aversive response to perceived threats against personal agency. For adolescents receiving HIV treatment in Botswana, we utilized a two-question, medication-specific reactance tool to assess whether: (1) verbal reminders to take medicines made adolescents want to avoid taking them, and, (2) whether adolescents felt anger when reminded to take medicines. Reactant adolescents had 2.05-fold (95% CI 1.23, 3.41) greater odds of treatment failure than non-reactant adolescents (p = 0.03). Adjusted risk of treatment failure was 14% (95% CI 3%, 28%) greater for each point elevation in reactance score (p = 0.016). Autonomy over medication-taking did not modify the association between reactance and treatment failure. Psychological reactance may be a useful interventional target for improving adolescent adherence.</p>

DOI

10.1007/s10461-020-02986-z

Alternate Title

AIDS Behav

PMID

32754779

Title

Trends in HIV Treatment Adherence Before and After HIV Status Disclosure to Adolescents in Botswana.

Year of Publication

2020

Date Published

2020 Apr 24

ISSN Number

1879-1972

Abstract

<p><strong>PURPOSE: </strong>This study aimed to determine if disclosure of HIV status to adolescents impacted their medication adherence and how medication autonomy might explain observed effects.</p>

<p><strong>METHODS: </strong>Three hundred adolescents on HIV treatment using electronic medication monitors were followed for 24&nbsp;months while undergoing routine care. One hundred six of the adolescents were HIV disclosure-naïve and HIV status disclosure in this group was assessed quarterly. Analyses included data from the 75 adolescents who experienced disclosure during the study providing adherence and autonomy data both predisclosure and postdisclosure. Segmented generalized estimating equations were used to examine the trend of adherence and autonomy predisclosure and postdisclosure. Covariates assessed include age at disclosure, sex, and orphan status.</p>

<p><strong>RESULTS: </strong>Median age at study entry was 12.2&nbsp;years (interquartile range 11.6-12.9). Incident disclosure occurred in 75 (71%) of the adolescents at a median age of 13.1&nbsp;years (interquartile range 12.5-13.9). Adherence decreased by 11% (95% confidence interval [CI] 7-15, p &lt; .001) during the predisclosure period and by 22% (95% CI 9-36, p&nbsp;= .001) during the postdisclosure period. Adolescents' autonomy over their medication-taking increased over time, but disclosure did not impact the rate of increase in measured medication-taking autonomy. On a scale of 1-4 assessing autonomy (1&nbsp;= receiving directly observed therapy and 4&nbsp;= taking medicines mostly without supervision), autonomy increased by an average of .03 units/month (95% CI .02-.03, p &lt; .001) predisclosure and by .05 units/month (95% CI&nbsp;-.01 to .11, p&nbsp;= .42) postdisclosure.</p>

<p><strong>CONCLUSIONS: </strong>The findings suggest that, among perinatally HIV infected adolescents, HIV status disclosure may adversely impact treatment adherence. Postdisclosure support to HIV infected adolescents should be intensified.</p>

DOI

10.1016/j.jadohealth.2020.02.023

Alternate Title

J Adolesc Health

PMID

32340848

Title

Pharmacy Refill Data are Poor Predictors of Virologic Treatment Outcomes in Adolescents with HIV in Botswana.

Year of Publication

2018

Date Published

2018 Nov 01

ISSN Number

1573-3254

Abstract

<p>In adults living with HIV, pharmacy refill data are good predictors of virologic failure (VF). The utility of pharmacy refill data for predicting VF in adolescents has not been reported. We evaluated data from 291 adolescents on antiretroviral therapy. The main outcome measure was VF, defined as two consecutive HIV viral load measurements ≥ 400 copies/mL during 24-months of follow-up. Pharmacy refill non-adherence was defined as two consecutive refill adherence measurements &lt; 95% during the same period. Fifty-three (18%) adolescents experienced VF. One hundred twenty-eight (44%) adolescents had refill non-adherence. Refill non-adherence had poor discriminative ability for indicating VF (receiver operating characteristic AUC = 0.60). Sensitivity and specificity for predicting VF was poor (60% (95% CI 46-74%) and 60% (95% CI 53-66%), respectively). The lack of a viable surrogate for VF in adolescents highlights the urgent need for more access to virologic testing and novel methods of monitoring adolescent treatment adherence.</p>

DOI

10.1007/s10461-018-2325-9

Alternate Title

AIDS Behav

PMID

30387024

WATCH THIS PAGE

Subscription is not available for this page.