First name
Aaron
Last name
Donoghue

Title

Implementing Family Presence During Pediatric Resuscitations in the Emergency Department: Family-Centered Care and Trauma-Informed Care Best Practices.

Year of Publication

2021

Number of Pages

689-692

Date Published

2021 Sep

ISSN Number

1527-2966

DOI

10.1016/j.jen.2021.07.003

Alternate Title

J Emerg Nurs

PMID

34530971

Title

Longitudinal effect of high frequency training on CPR performance during simulated and actual pediatric cardiac arrest.

Year of Publication

2021

Number of Pages

100117

Date Published

2021 Jun

ISSN Number

2666-5204

Abstract

<p><strong>Study aim: </strong>To determine the impact of high-frequency CPR training on performance during simulated and real pediatric CPR events in a pediatric emergency department (ED).</p>

<p><strong>Methods: </strong>Prospective observational study. A high-frequency CPR training program (Resuscitation Quality Improvement (RQI)) was implemented among ED providers in a children's hospital. Data on CPR performance was collected longitundinally during quarterly retraining sessions; scores were analyzed between quarter 1 and quarter 4 by nonparametric methods. Data on CPR performance during actual patient events was collected by simultaneous combination of video review and compression monitor devices to allow measurement of CPR quality by individual providers; linear mixed effects models were used to analyze the association between RQI components and CPR quality.</p>

<p><strong>Results: </strong>159 providers completed four consecutive RQI sessions. Scores for all CPR tasks during retraining sessions significantly improved during the study period. 28 actual CPR events were captured during the study period; 49 observations of RQI trained providers performing CPR on children were analyzed. A significant association was found between the number of prior RQI sessions and the percent of compressions meeting guidelines for rate (β coefficient -0.08; standard error 0.04; p = 0.03).</p>

<p><strong>Conclusions: </strong>Over a 15 month period, RQI resulted in improved performance during training sessions for all skills. A significant association was found between number of sessions and adherence to compression rate guidelines during real patient events. Fewer than 30% of providers performed CPR on a patient during the study period. Multicenter studies over longer time periods should be undertaken to overcome the limitation of these rare events.</p>

DOI

10.1016/j.resplu.2021.100117

Alternate Title

Resusc Plus

PMID

34223376

Title

Characteristics and Outcomes of Pediatric Heart Failure-Related Emergency Department Visits in the United States: A Population-Based Study.

Year of Publication

2018

Number of Pages

114-118.e3.

Date Published

2018 Feb

ISSN Number

1097-6833

Abstract

<p><strong>OBJECTIVES: </strong>To describe the frequency, characteristics, and outcomes of heart failure-related emergency department (ED) visits in pediatric patients. We aimed to test the hypothesis that these visits are associated with higher admission rates, mortality, and resource utilization.</p>

<p><strong>STUDY DESIGN: </strong>A retrospective analysis of the Nationwide Emergency Department Sample for 2010 of patients ≤18 years of age was performed to describe ED visits with and without heart failure. Cases were identified using International Classification of Disease, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification codes and assessed for factors associated with admission, mortality, and resource utilization.</p>

<p><strong>RESULTS: </strong>Among 28.6 million pediatric visits to the ED, there were 5971 (0.02%) heart failure-related cases. Heart failure-related ED patients were significantly more likely to be admitted (59.8% vs 4.01%; OR 35.3, 95% CI 31.5-39.7). Among heart failure-related visits, admission was more common in patients with congenital heart disease (OR 5.0, 95% CI 3.3-7.4) and in those with comorbidities including respiratory failure (OR 78.3, 95% CI 10.4-591) and renal failure (OR 7.9, 95% CI 1.7-36.3). Heart failure-related cases admitted to the hospital had a higher likelihood of death than nonheart failure-related cases (5.9% vs 0.32%, P &lt; .001). Factors associated with mortality included respiratory failure (OR 4.5, 95% CI 2.2-9.2) and renal failure (OR 7.8, 95% CI 2.9-20.7). Heart failure-related ED visits were more expensive than nonheart failure-related ED visits ($1460 [IQR $861-2038] vs $778 [IQR $442-1375] [P &lt; .01].)</p>

<p><strong>CONCLUSIONS</strong>: Heart failure-related visits represent a minority of pediatric ED visits but are associated with increased hospital admission and resource utilization.</p>

DOI

10.1016/j.jpeds.2017.10.009

PMID

29221691

Title

Performance in Trauma Resuscitation at an Urban Tertiary Level I Pediatric Trauma Center.

Year of Publication

2016

Number of Pages

756-762

Date Published

2016 Nov

ISSN Number

1535-1815

Abstract

<p><strong>BACKGROUND: </strong>The role of the surveyor in trauma resuscitations is to identify life-threatening injuries and is meant to be conducted by a set protocol for every patient. Optimal performance of the trauma survey is known to be a challenge in pediatric trauma resuscitation. A postulated reason for this observation is that many trainees, such as pediatric residents, who perform the trauma survey have minimal experience and do not have formal advanced trauma life support training. The assessment of factors that may be obstacles in performing the trauma survey has not been studied robustly.</p>

<p><strong>OBJECTIVE: </strong>The objective of this retrospective cohort study was to use video review of resuscitation of real-life traumatically injured children to (1) describe the characteristics of the trauma patient, the surveyor, and the trauma response team in its current state of function at a tertiary level I trauma center, (2) describe current performance of primary and secondary surveys, as measured by an assessment tool, and (3) determine whether there are specific characteristics associated with reduced quality, completeness, or timeliness of the assessment of an injured child.</p>

<p><strong>METHODS: </strong>Retrospective review of emergency department (ED) trauma activations captured by video recording between June 2009 and January 2012. Video-recorded resuscitations were reviewed, and survey performance was scored using a novel assessment tool applying a scoring system (0, 1, or 2 points) for each essential element (airway, breathing, circulation, etc.) accounting for quality, sequence, and timing of assessments. Maximum score was 8 points for the primary survey and 22 points for the secondary survey. Time to completion of survey elements was recorded. Chart review identified surveyor characteristics (level of training and type of training program) and patient data fields (age, mechanism of injury, trauma level, Glasgow Coma Score, time of encounter, disposition, and number of procedures). Descriptive statistics and univariate analysis were performed.</p>

<p><strong>RESULTS: </strong>Of 749 eligible trauma activations, 228 activations were enrolled in the study with complete data for 202 patients. Most activations met level II criteria and involved blunt trauma. Most patients had a Glasgow Coma Score of 15 and were non-ICU inpatient admissions. PGY-3 residents performed the most surveys (53% of surveys done by residents). Pediatric residents performed 46% of surveys; emergency medicine (EM) residents, 41%; and pediatric EM fellows, 6%. Median scores on primary and secondary surveys were 7 and 12, respectively; median time to completion was 82 seconds and 265 seconds, respectively. Only 22% of primary surveys and 0% of secondary surveys were performed completely. Pediatric EM fellows had the highest mean score on primary and secondary survey. Pediatric EM fellows took longest to perform primary survey and shortest to complete secondary survey. Mean scores on primary and secondary survey were not significantly different between pediatric and EM residents (6.7 vs 6.7; 12.5 vs 11.6). There was no association between survey scores and level or type of training. Emergency medicine residents spent less time on the trauma survey, but this difference did not reach statistical significance.</p>

<p><strong>CONCLUSIONS: </strong>Primary and secondary surveys are frequently performed incompletely and inefficiently regardless of level of training or type of training program. There is no difference in measured performance among different types of residency programs. The impact of trauma resuscitation education on improved survey performance should be studied prospectively.</p>

DOI

10.1097/PEC.0000000000000942

Alternate Title

Pediatr Emerg Care

PMID

27811534

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