First name
Annique
Last name
Hogan

Title

Implementation of a Follow-Up System for Pediatric Sepsis Survivors in a Large Academic Pediatric Intensive Care Unit.

Year of Publication

2021

Number of Pages

691692

Date Published

2021

ISSN Number

2296-2360

Abstract

<p>Survivors of pediatric sepsis often develop new morbidities and deterioration in quality of life after sepsis, leading to a need for improved follow-up for children who survive sepsis. To implement a follow-up system for pediatric sepsis survivors in a pediatric health system. We performed a retrospective case series of patients treated for sepsis from October 2018 through October 2019 in a pediatric intensive care unit in a quaternary children's hospital, and describe implementation of a follow-up system for sepsis survivors. Program planning started in 2017 with multidisciplinary meetings including physical, occupational, and speech therapists, teachers, neuropsychologists, and coordinators from other survivorship programs (neonatology, stroke, and oncology). In 2018, a workshop was held to consult with local and national experts. The Pediatric Sepsis Survivorship Program launched in October 2018 led by a nurse coordinator who met with families to educate about sepsis and offer post-discharge follow-up. Patients with high pre-existing medical complexity or established subspecialty care were referred for follow-up through existing care coordination or subspecialty services plus guidance to monitor for post-sepsis morbidity. For patients with low-moderate medical complexity, the nurse coordinator administered a telephone-based health-assessment 2-3 months after discharge to screen for new physical or psychosocial morbidity. Patients flagged with concerns were referred to their primary physician and/or to expedited neuropsychological evaluation to utilize existing medical services. Of 80 sepsis patients, 10 died, 20 were referred to care coordination by the program, and 13 had subspecialty follow-up. Five patients were followed in different health systems, four were adults not appropriate for existing follow-up programs, four remained hospitalized, and four were missed due to short stay or unavailable caregivers. The remaining 20 patients were scheduled for follow-up with the Pediatric Sepsis Program. Nine patients completed the telephone assessment. Four patients were receiving new physical or occupational therapy, and one patient was referred for neuropsychology evaluation due to new difficulties with attention, behavior, and completion of school tasks. Implementation of an efficient, low-cost pediatric sepsis survivorship program was successful by utilizing existing systems of care, when available, and filling a follow-up gap in screening for select patients.</p>

DOI

10.3389/fped.2021.691692

Alternate Title

Front Pediatr

PMID

34150690

Title

Association of a Targeted Population Health Management Intervention with Hospital Admissions and Bed-Days for Medicaid-Enrolled Children.

Year of Publication

2019

Number of Pages

e1918306

Date Published

2019 Dec 02

ISSN Number

2574-3805

Abstract

<p><strong>Importance: </strong>As the proportion of children with Medicaid coverage increases, many pediatric health systems are searching for effective strategies to improve management of this high-risk population and reduce the need for inpatient resources.</p>

<p><strong>Objective: </strong>To estimate the association of a targeted population health management intervention for children eligible for Medicaid with changes in monthly hospital admissions and bed-days.</p>

<p><strong>Design, Setting, and Participants: </strong>This quality improvement study, using difference-in-differences analysis, deployed integrated team interventions in an academic pediatric health system with 31 in-network primary care practices among children enrolled in Medicaid who received care at the health system's hospital and primary care practices. Data were collected from January 2014 to June 2017. Data analysis took place from January 2018 to June 2019.</p>

<p><strong>Exposures: </strong>Targeted deployment of integrated team interventions, each including electronic medical record registry development and reporting alongside a common longitudinal quality improvement framework to distribute workflow among interdisciplinary clinicians and community health workers.</p>

<p><strong>Main Outcomes and Measures: </strong>Trends in monthly inpatient admissions and bed-days (per 1000 beneficiaries) during the preimplementation period (ie, January 1, 2014, to June 30, 2015) compared with the postimplementation period (ie, July 1, 2015, to June 30, 2017).</p>

<p><strong>Results: </strong>Of 25 460 children admitted to the hospital's health system during the study period, 8418 (33.1%) (3869 [46.0%] girls; 3308 [39.3%] aged ≤1 year; 5694 [67.6%] black) were from in-network practices, and 17 042 (67.9%) (7779 [45.7%] girls; 6031 [35.4%] aged ≤1 year; 7167 [41.2%] black) were from out-of-network practices. Compared with out-of-network patients, in-network patients experienced a decrease of 0.39 (95% CI, 0.10-0.68) monthly admissions per 1000 beneficiaries (P = .009) and 2.20 (95% CI, 0.90-3.49) monthly bed-days per 1000 beneficiaries (P = .001). Accounting for disproportionate growth in the number of children with medical complexity who were in-network to the health system, this group experienced a monthly decrease in admissions of 0.54 (95% CI, 0.13-0.95) per 1000 beneficiaries (P = .01) and in bed-days of 3.25 (95% CI, 1.46-5.04) per 1000 beneficiaries (P = .001) compared with out-of-network patients. Annualized, these differences could translate to a reduction of 3600 bed-days for a population of 93 000 children eligible for Medicaid.</p>

<p><strong>Conclusions and Relevance: </strong>In this quality improvement study, a population health management approach providing targeted integrated care team interventions for children with medical and social complexity being cared for in a primary care network was associated with a reduction in service utilization compared with an out-of-network comparison group. Standardizing the work of care teams with quality improvement methods and integrated information technology tools may provide a scalable strategy for health systems to mitigate risk from a growing population of children who are eligible for Medicaid.</p>

DOI

10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2019.18306

Alternate Title

JAMA Netw Open

PMID

31880799

Title

Developing the Capacity for Rapid-Cycle Improvement at a Large Freestanding Children's Hospital.

Year of Publication

2016

Date Published

2016 Jul 14

ISSN Number

2154-1663

Abstract

<p><strong>BACKGROUND: </strong>To develop the capacity for rapid-cycle improvement at the unit level, a large freestanding children's hospital designated 2 inpatient units with normal patient loads and workforce as pilot "Innovation Units" where frontline staff was trained to lead rigorous improvement portfolios.</p>

<p><strong>METHODS: </strong>Frontline staff received improvement training, and interdisciplinary teams brainstormed ideas for tests of change. Ideas were prioritized using an impact-effort evaluation and an assessment of how they aligned with high-level goals. A template for each test summarized the following: the opportunity for improvement, the test being conducted, dates for the tests, driver diagrams, metrics to measure effects, baseline data, results, findings, and next steps. Successful interventions were implemented and disseminated to other units.</p>

<p><strong>RESULTS: </strong>Multidisciplinary staff generated 150 improvement ideas and Innovation Units collectively ran &gt;40 plan-do-study-act cycles. Of the 10 distinct improvement projects, elements of all 10 were deemed "successful" and fully implemented on the unit, and elements from 8 were spread to other units. More than 3 years later, elements of all of the successful improvements are still in practice in some form on the units, and each unit has tested &gt;20 additional improvement ideas, using multiple plan-do-study-act cycles to refine them.</p>

<p><strong>CONCLUSIONS: </strong>The Innovation Unit model successfully engaged frontline staff in improvement work and established a sustainable system and framework for managing rigorous improvement portfolios at the unit level. Other hospitals and health care delivery settings may find our quality improvement approach helpful, especially because it is rooted in the microsystem of care delivery.</p>

DOI

10.1542/hpeds.2015-0239

Alternate Title

Hosp Pediatr

PMID

27418671

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