First name
Susan
Middle name
L
Last name
Dougherty

Title

A Toddler Parenting Intervention in Primary Care for Caregivers With Depression Symptoms.

Year of Publication

2017

Number of Pages

465-480

Date Published

2017 Oct

ISSN Number

1573-6547

Abstract

<p>Caregiver depression impacts parenting behaviors and has deleterious effects on child behavior. Evidence-based interventions to address parenting have not been adapted for use with depressed caregivers in pediatric primary care settings. Our study examined the feasibility and explored outcomes of an evidence-based parenting program implemented in primary care and adapted for caregivers with depressive symptoms caring for toddlers. We conducted a randomized controlled trial with a wait-list control. Participants were caregivers who screened positive for depressive symptoms in pediatric settings with a toddler. Our study was implemented from July 2011 to June 2012. We adapted the Incredible Years Parents, Babies and Toddlers program with the addition of depression psychoeducation (12 weekly sessions), and assessed caregivers at baseline and immediately post-intervention. We assessed participation rates, depressive symptoms, parenting discipline practices, social support, and parenting stress. Our results revealed that 32 caregivers participating in the intervention group had significantly greater improvement in self-reported parenting discipline practices compared to the 29 wait-list control group caregivers. We found no differences between groups in depressive symptoms, social support, or parenting stress. Our study demonstrated that the average attendance was poor (mean attendance&nbsp;=&nbsp;3.7 sessions). We adapted an evidence-based parenting intervention for caregivers with depressive symptoms and toddlers in primary care; however, participation was challenging. Alternative intervention strategies are needed to reach and retain low-income caregivers with depression symptoms as they face multiple barriers to participation in groups within center-based services. Trial Registration Clinical Trials.gov identifier NCT01464619.</p>

DOI

10.1007/s10935-017-0481-8

Alternate Title

J Prim Prev

PMID

28733799

Title

Identifying Communication-Impaired Pediatric Patients Using Detailed Hospital Administrative Data.

Year of Publication

2016

Date Published

2016 Jul 5

ISSN Number

2154-1663

Abstract

<p><strong>BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: </strong>Pediatric inpatients with communication impairment may experience inadequate pain and symptom management. Research regarding potential variation in care among patients with and without communication impairment is hampered because existing pediatric databases do not include information about patient communication ability per se, even though these data sets do contain information about diagnoses and medical interventions that are probably correlated with the probability of communication impairment. Our objective was to develop and evaluate a classification model to identify patients in a large administrative database likely to be communication impaired.</p>

<p><strong>METHODS: </strong>Our sample included 236 hospitalized patients aged ≥12 months whose ability to communicate about pain had been assessed. We randomly split this sample into development (n = 118) and validation (n = 118) sets. A priori, we developed a set of specific diagnoses, technology dependencies, procedures, and medications recorded in the Pediatric Health Information System likely to be strongly associated with communication impairment. We used logistic regression modeling to calculate the probability of communication impairment for each patient in the development set, assessed the model performance, and evaluated the performance of the 11-variable model in the validation set.</p>

<p><strong>RESULTS: </strong>In the validation sample, the classification model showed excellent classification accuracy (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve 0.92; sensitivity 82.6%; 95% confidence interval, 74%-100%; specificity 86.3%; 95% confidence interval, 80%-97%). For the complete sample, the predicted probability of communication impairment demonstrated excellent calibration with the observed communication impairment status.</p>

<p><strong>CONCLUSIONS: </strong>Hospitalized pediatric patients with communication impairment can be accurately identified in a large hospital administrative database.</p>

DOI

10.1542/hpeds.2015-0154

Alternate Title

Hosp Pediatr

PMID

27381628

Title

Child Adult Relationship Enhancement in Primary Care: A randomized trial of a parent training for child behavior problems.

Year of Publication

2016

Date Published

2016 Jun 25

ISSN Number

1876-2867

Abstract

<p><strong>OBJECTIVE: </strong>Child Adult Relationship Enhancement in Primary Care (PriCARE) is a 6-session group parent training designed to teach positive parenting skills. Our objective was to measure PriCARE's impact on child behavior and parenting attitudes.</p>

<p><strong>METHODS: </strong>Parents of children 2 to 6 years old with behavior concerns were randomized to PriCARE (n=80) or control (n=40). Child behavior and parenting attitudes were measured at baseline (0 weeks), program completion (9 weeks), and 7 weeks following program completion (16 weeks) using the Eyberg Child Behavior Inventory (ECBI) and the Adult Adolescent Parenting Inventory-2 (AAPI2). Linear regression models compared mean ECBI and AAPI2 change scores from 0 to 16 weeks in the PriCARE and control groups, adjusted for baseline scores.</p>

<p><strong>RESULTS: </strong>Of those randomized to PriCARE, 43% attended 3 or more sessions. Decreases in mean ECBI intensity and problem scores between 0 and 16 weeks were greater in the PriCARE group, reflecting a larger improvement in behavior problems [intensity: -22 (-16, -29) vs -7 (2, -17), p=0.012; problem: -5 (-4, -7) vs -2 (0, -4), p=0.014]. Scores on 3 of the 5 AAPI2 sub-scales reflected greater improvements in parenting attitudes in the PriCARE group compared to control in the following areas: empathy towards children's needs [0.82 (1.14, 0.51) vs 0.25 (0.70, -0.19), p=0.04], corporal punishment [0.22 (0.45, 0.00) vs -0.30 (0.02, -0.61), p=0.009], and power and independence [0.37 (0.76, -0.02) vs -0.64 (-0.09, -1.19), p=0.003].</p>

<p><strong>CONCLUSIONS: </strong>PriCARE shows promise in improving parent-reported child-behavior problems in preschool-aged children and increasing positive parenting attitudes.</p>

DOI

10.1016/j.acap.2016.06.009

Alternate Title

Acad Pediatr

PMID

27353449

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