First name
Rakesh
Middle name
D
Last name
Mistry

Title

Developing Consensus on Clinical Outcomes for Children with Mild Pneumonia: A Delphi Study.

Year of Publication

2023

Date Published

01/2023

ISSN Number

2048-7207

Abstract

BACKGROUND: The absence of consensus for outcomes in pediatric antibiotic trials is a major barrier to research harmonization and clinical translation. We sought to develop expert consensus on study outcomes for clinical trials of children with mild community-acquired pneumonia (CAP).

METHODS: Applying the Delphi method, a multispecialty expert panel ranked the importance of various components of clinical response and treatment failure outcomes in children with mild CAP for use in research. During Round 1, panelists suggested additional outcomes in open-ended responses that were added to subsequent rounds of consensus building. For Rounds 2 and 3, panelists were provided their own prior responses and summary statistics for each item in the previous round. The consensus was defined by >70% agreement.

RESULTS: The expert panel determined that response to and failure of treatment should be addressed at a median of 3 days after initiation. Complete or substantial improvement in fever, work of breathing, dyspnea, tachypnea when afebrile, oral intake, and activity should be included as components of adequate clinical response outcomes. Clinical signs and symptoms including persistent or worsening fever, work of breathing, and reduced oral intake should be included in treatment failure outcomes. Interventions including receipt of parenteral fluids, supplemental oxygen, need for high-flow nasal cannula oxygen therapy, and change in prescription of antibiotics should also be considered in treatment failure outcomes.

CONCLUSIONS: Clinical response and treatment failure outcomes determined by the consensus of this multidisciplinary expert panel can be used for pediatric CAP studies to provide objective data translatable to clinical practice.

DOI

10.1093/jpids/piac123

Alternate Title

J Pediatric Infect Dis Soc

PMID

36625856

Title

Serious Bacterial Infections in Young Febrile Infants With Positive Urinalysis Results.

Year of Publication

2022

Date Published

09/2022

ISSN Number

1098-4275

Abstract

 

OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence of bacteremia and/or bacterial meningitis in febrile infants ≤60 days of age with positive urinalysis (UA) results.

METHODS: Secondary analysis of a prospective observational study of noncritical febrile infants ≤60 days between 2011 and 2019 conducted in the Pediatric Emergency Care Applied Research Network emergency departments. Participants had temperatures ≥38°C and were evaluated with blood cultures and had UAs available for analysis. We report the prevalence of bacteremia and bacterial meningitis in those with and without positive UA results.

RESULTS: Among 7180 infants, 1090 (15.2%) had positive UA results. The risk of bacteremia was higher in those with positive versus negative UA results (63/1090 [5.8%] vs 69/6090 [1.1%], difference 4.7% [3.3% to 6.1%]). There was no difference in the prevalence of bacterial meningitis in infants ≤28 days of age with positive versus negative UA results (∼1% in both groups). However, among 697 infants aged 29 to 60 days with positive UA results, there were no cases of bacterial meningitis in comparison to 9 of 4153 with negative UA results (0.2%, difference -0.2% [-0.4% to -0.1%]). In addition, there were no cases of bacteremia and/or bacterial meningitis in the 148 infants ≤60 days of age with positive UA results who had the Pediatric Emergency Care Applied Research Network low-risk blood thresholds of absolute neutrophil count <4 × 103 cells/mm3 and procalcitonin <0.5 ng/mL.

CONCLUSIONS: Among noncritical febrile infants ≤60 days of age with positive UA results, there were no cases of bacterial meningitis in those aged 29 to 60 days and no cases of bacteremia and/or bacterial meningitis in any low-risk infants based on low-risk blood thresholds in both months of life. These findings can guide lumbar puncture use and other clinical decision making.

DOI

10.1542/peds.2021-055633

Alternate Title

Pediatrics

PMID

36097858

Title

Association of Herpes Simplex Virus Testing with Hospital Length of Stay for Infants ≤60 Days of Age Undergoing Evaluation for Meningitis.

Year of Publication

2019

Number of Pages

E1-E4

Date Published

2019 May 12

ISSN Number

1553-5606

Abstract

Although neonatal herpes simplex virus (HSV) causes significant morbidity, utilization of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) HSV polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test remains variable. Our objective was to examine the association of CSF HSV PCR testing with length of stay (LOS) in a 20-center retrospective cohort of hospitalized infants aged ≤60 days undergoing evaluation for meningitis after adjustment for patient-level factors and clustering by center. Of 20,496 eligible infants, 7,399 (36.1%) had a CSF HSV PCR test performed, and 46 (0.6% of those tested) had a positive test. Infants who had a CSF HSV PCR test performed had a 23% longer hospital LOS (incident rate ratio 1.23; 95% CI: 1.14-1.33). Targeted CSF HSV PCR testing may mitigate the impact on LOS for low-risk infants.

DOI

10.12788/jhm.3202

Alternate Title

J Hosp Med

PMID

31112493

Title

Invasive Bacterial Infections in Afebrile Infants Diagnosed With Acute Otitis Media.

Year of Publication

2021

Date Published

2021 01

ISSN Number

1098-4275

Abstract

<p><strong>OBJECTIVES: </strong>To determine the prevalence of invasive bacterial infections (IBIs) and adverse events in afebrile infants with acute otitis media (AOM).</p>

<p><strong>METHODS: </strong>We conducted a 33-site cross-sectional study of afebrile infants ≤90 days of age with AOM seen in emergency departments from 2007 to 2017. Eligible infants were identified using emergency department diagnosis codes and confirmed by chart review. IBIs (bacteremia and meningitis) were determined by the growth of pathogenic bacteria in blood or cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) culture. Adverse events were defined as substantial complications resulting from or potentially associated with AOM. We used generalized linear mixed-effects models to identify factors associated with IBI diagnostic testing, controlling for site-level clustering effect.</p>

<p><strong>RESULTS: </strong>Of 5270 infants screened, 1637 met study criteria. None of the 278 (0%; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0%-1.4%) infants with blood cultures had bacteremia; 0 of 102 (0%; 95% CI: 0%-3.6%) with CSF cultures had bacterial meningitis; 2 of 645 (0.3%; 95% CI: 0.1%-1.1%) infants with 30-day follow-up had adverse events, including lymphadenitis (1) and culture-negative sepsis (1). Diagnostic testing for IBI varied across sites and by age; overall, 278 (17.0%) had blood cultures, and 102 (6.2%) had CSF cultures obtained. Compared with infants 0 to 28 days old, older infants were less likely to have blood cultures ( &lt; .001) or CSF cultures ( &lt; .001) obtained.</p>

<p><strong>CONCLUSION: </strong>Afebrile infants with clinician-diagnosed AOM have a low prevalence of IBIs and adverse events; therefore, outpatient management without diagnostic testing may be reasonable.</p>

DOI

10.1542/peds.2020-1571

Alternate Title

Pediatrics

PMID

33288730

Title

Predictors of Invasive Herpes Simplex Virus Infection in Young Infants.

Year of Publication

2021

Date Published

2021 Aug 26

ISSN Number

1098-4275

Abstract

<p><strong>OBJECTIVES: </strong>To identify independent predictors of and derive a risk score for invasive herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection.</p>

<p><strong>METHODS: </strong>In this 23-center nested case-control study, we matched 149 infants with HSV to 1340 controls; all were ≤60 days old and had cerebrospinal fluid obtained within 24 hours of presentation or had HSV detected. The primary and secondary outcomes were invasive (disseminated or central nervous system) or any HSV infection, respectively.</p>

<p><strong>RESULTS: </strong>Of all infants included , 90 (60.4%) had invasive and 59 (39.6%) had skin, eyes, and mouth disease. Predictors independently associated with invasive HSV included younger age (adjusted odds ratio [aOR]: 9.1 [95% confidence interval (CI): 3.4-24.5] &lt;14 and 6.4 [95% CI: 2.3 to 17.8] 14-28 days, respectively, compared with &gt;28 days), prematurity (aOR: 2.3, 95% CI: 1.1 to 5.1), seizure at home (aOR: 6.1, 95% CI: 2.3 to 16.4), ill appearance (aOR: 4.2, 95% CI: 2.0 to 8.4), abnormal triage temperature (aOR: 2.9, 95% CI: 1.6 to 5.3), vesicular rash (aOR: 54.8, (95% CI: 16.6 to 180.9), thrombocytopenia (aOR: 4.4, 95% CI: 1.6 to 12.4), and cerebrospinal fluid pleocytosis (aOR: 3.5, 95% CI: 1.2 to 10.0). These variables were transformed to derive the HSV risk score (point range 0-17). Infants with invasive HSV had a higher median score (6, interquartile range: 4-8) than those without invasive HSV (3, interquartile range: 1.5-4), with an area under the curve for invasive HSV disease of 0.85 (95% CI: 0.80-0.91). When using a cut-point of ≥3, the HSV risk score had a sensitivity of 95.6% (95% CI: 84.9% to 99.5%), specificity of 40.1% (95% CI: 36.8% to 43.6%), and positive likelihood ratio 1.60 (95% CI: 1.5 to 1.7) and negative likelihood ratio 0.11 (95% CI: 0.03 to 0.43).</p>

<p><strong>CONCLUSIONS: </strong>A novel HSV risk score identified infants at extremely low risk for invasive HSV who may not require routine testing or empirical treatment.</p>

DOI

10.1542/peds.2021-050052

Alternate Title

Pediatrics

PMID

34446535

Title

The Champagne Tap: Time to Pop the Cork?

Year of Publication

2020

Number of Pages

1194-1198

Date Published

2020 11

ISSN Number

1553-2712

Abstract

<p><strong>BACKGROUND: </strong>A "champagne tap" is a lumbar puncture with no cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) red blood cells (RBCs). Clinicians disagree whether the absence of CSF white blood cells (WBCs) is also required.</p>

<p><strong>AIMS: </strong>As supervising providers frequently reward trainees after a champagne tap, we investigated how varying the definition impacted the frequency of trainee accolades.</p>

<p><strong>MATERIALS &amp; METHODS: </strong>We performed a secondary analysis of a retrospective cross-sectional study of infants ≤60&nbsp;days of age who had a CSF culture performed in the emergency department (ED) at one of 20 centers participating in a Pediatric Emergency Medicine Collaborative Research Committee (PEM CRC) endorsed study. Our primary outcomes were a champagne tap defined by either a CSF RBC count of 0&nbsp;cells/mm regardless of CSF WBC count or both CSF RBC and WBC counts of 0&nbsp;cells/mm .</p>

<p><strong>RESULTS: </strong>Of the 23,618 eligible encounters, 20,358 (86.2%) had both a CSF RBC and WBC count obtained. Overall, 3,147 (13.3%) had a CSF RBC count of 0&nbsp;cells/mm and 377 (1.6%) had both CSF WBC and RBC counts of 0&nbsp;cells/mm (relative rate 8.35, 95% confidence interval 7.51 to 9.27).</p>

<p><strong>CONCLUSIONS: </strong>In infants, a lumbar puncture with a CSF RBC count of 0&nbsp;cells/mm regardless of the CSF WBC count occurred eight-times more frequently than one with both CSF WBC and RBC counts of 0&nbsp;cells/mm . A broader champagne tap definition would allow more frequent recognition of procedural success, with the potential to foster a supportive community during medical training, potentially protecting against burnout.</p>

DOI

10.1111/acem.13966

Alternate Title

Acad Emerg Med

PMID

32187765

Title

Cerebrospinal Fluid Reference Values for Young Infants Undergoing Lumbar Puncture.

Year of Publication

2018

Date Published

2018 Feb 02

ISSN Number

1098-4275

Abstract

<p><strong>OBJECTIVES: </strong>To determine age-specific reference values and quantify age-related changes for cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) white blood cell (WBC) counts and protein and glucose concentrations in infants ≤60 days of age.</p>

<p><strong>METHODS: </strong>This multicenter, cross-sectional study included infants ≤60 days old with CSF cultures and complete CSF profiles obtained within 24 hours of presentation. Those with conditions suspected or known to cause abnormal CSF parameters (eg, meningitis) and those with a hospital length of stay of &gt;72 hours were excluded. Reference standards were determined for infants ≤28 days of age and 29 to 60 days of age by using the third quartile +1.5 interquartile range for WBC and protein and the first quartile -1.5 interquartile range for glucose. CSF parameter centile curves based on age were calculated by using the LMST method.</p>

<p><strong>RESULTS: </strong>A total of 7766 patients were included. CSF WBC counts were higher in infants ≤28 days of age (upper bound: 15 cells/mm) than in infants 29 to 60 days of age (upper bound: 9 cells/mm;&lt; .001). CSF protein concentrations were higher in infants ≤28 days of age (upper bound: 127 mg/dL) than in infants 29 to 60 days of age (upper bound: 99 mg/dL;&lt; .001). CSF glucose concentrations were lower in infants ≤28 days of age (lower bound: 25 mg/dL) than in infants 29 to 60 days of age (lower bound: 27 mg/dL;&lt; .001).</p>

<p><strong>CONCLUSIONS: </strong>The age-specific CSF WBC count, protein concentration, and glucose concentration reference values identified in this large, multicenter cohort of infants can be used to interpret the results of lumbar puncture in infants ≤60 days of age.</p>

DOI

10.1542/peds.2017-3405

Alternate Title

Pediatrics

PMID

29437883

Title

Herpes Simplex Virus Infection in Infants Undergoing Meningitis Evaluation.

Year of Publication

2018

Number of Pages

pii: e20171688

Date Published

2018 Feb

ISSN Number

1098-4275

Abstract

<p><strong>BACKGROUND: </strong>Although neonatal herpes simplex virus (HSV) is a potentially devastating infection requiring prompt evaluation and treatment, large-scale assessments of the frequency in potentially infected infants have not been performed.</p>

<p><strong>METHODS: </strong>We performed a retrospective cross-sectional study of infants ≤60 days old who had cerebrospinal fluid culture testing performed in 1 of 23 participating North American emergency departments. HSV infection was defined by a positive HSV polymerase chain reaction or viral culture. The primary outcome was the proportion of encounters in which HSV infection was identified. Secondary outcomes included frequency of central nervous system (CNS) and disseminated HSV, and HSV testing and treatment patterns.</p>

<p><strong>RESULTS: </strong>Of 26 533 eligible encounters, 112 infants had HSV identified (0.42%, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.35%-0.51%). Of these, 90 (80.4%) occurred in weeks 1 to 4, 10 (8.9%) in weeks 5 to 6, and 12 (10.7%) in weeks 7 to 9. The median age of HSV-infected infants was 14 days (interquartile range: 9-24 days). HSV infection was more common in 0 to 28-day-old infants compared with 29- to 60-day-old infants (odds ratio 3.9; 95% CI: 2.4-6.2). Sixty-eight (0.26%, 95% CI: 0.21%-0.33%) had CNS or disseminated HSV. The proportion of infants tested for HSV (35%; range 14%-72%) and to whom acyclovir was administered (23%; range 4%-53%) varied widely across sites.</p>

<p><strong>CONCLUSIONS: </strong>An HSV infection was uncommon in young infants evaluated for CNS infection, particularly in the second month of life. Evidence-based approaches to the evaluation for HSV in young infants are needed.</p>

DOI

10.1542/peds.2017-1688

Alternate Title

Pediatrics

PMID

29298827

Title

Genomic Circuitry Underlying Immunological Response to Pediatric Acute Respiratory Infection.

Year of Publication

2018

Number of Pages

411-426

Date Published

2018 Jan 09

ISSN Number

2211-1247

Abstract

<p>Acute respiratory tract viral infections (ARTIs) cause significant morbidity and mortality. CD8 T&nbsp;cells are fundamental to host responses, but transcriptional alterations underlying anti-viral mechanisms and links to clinical characteristics remain unclear. CD8 T&nbsp;cell transcriptional circuitry in acutely ill pediatric patients with influenza-like illness was distinct for&nbsp;different viral pathogens. Although changes included expected upregulation of interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs), transcriptional downregulation was prominent upon exposure to innate immune signals in early IFV infection. Network analysis linked changes to severity of infection, asthma, sex, and age. An influenza pediatric signature (IPS) distinguished acute influenza from other ARTIs and outperformed other influenza prediction gene lists. The IPS allowed a deeper investigation of the connection between transcriptional alterations and clinical characteristics of acute illness, including age-based differences in circuits connecting the STAT1/2 pathway to ISGs. A CD8 T&nbsp;cell-focused systems immunology approach in pediatrics identified age-based alterations in ARTI host response pathways.</p>

DOI

10.1016/j.celrep.2017.12.043

Alternate Title

Cell Rep

PMID

29320737

Title

Current State of Antimicrobial Stewardship in Children's Hospital Emergency Departments.

Year of Publication

2017

Number of Pages

1-7

Date Published

2017 Feb 08

ISSN Number

1559-6834

Abstract

<p>BACKGROUND Antimicrobial stewardship programs (ASPs) effectively optimize antibiotic use for inpatients; however, the extent of emergency department (ED) involvement in ASPs has not been described.</p>

<p>OBJECTIVE To determine current ED involvement in children's hospital ASPs and to assess beliefs and preferred methods of implementation for ED-based ASPs.</p>

<p>METHODS A cross-sectional survey of 37 children's hospitals participating in the Sharing Antimicrobial Resistance Practices collaboration was conducted. Surveys were distributed to ASP leaders and ED medical directors at each institution. Items assessed included beliefs regarding ED antibiotic prescribing, ED prescribing resources, ASP methods used in the ED such as clinical decision support and clinical care guidelines, ED participation in ASP activities, and preferred methods for ED-based ASP implementation.</p>

<p>RESULTS A total of 36 ASP leaders (97.3%) and 32 ED directors (86.5%) responded; the overall response rate was 91.9%. Most ASP leaders (97.8%) and ED directors (93.7%) agreed that creation of ED-based ASPs was necessary. ED resources for antibiotic prescribing were obtained via the Internet or electronic health records (EHRs) for 29 hospitals (81.3%). The main ASP activities for the ED included production of antibiograms (77.8%) and creation of clinical care guidelines for pneumonia (83.3%). The ED was represented on 3 hospital ASP committees (8.3%). No hospital ASPs actively monitored outpatient ED prescribing. Most ASP leaders (77.8%) and ED directors (81.3%) preferred implementation of ED-based ASPs using clinical decision support integrated into the EHR.</p>

<p>CONCLUSIONS Although ED involvement in ASPs is limited, both ASP and ED leaders believe that ED-based ASPs are necessary. Many children's hospitals have the capability to implement ED-based ASPs via the preferred method: EHR clinical decision support.</p>

DOI

10.1017/ice.2017.3

Alternate Title

Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol

PMID

28173888

WATCH THIS PAGE

Subscription is not available for this page.