First name
Amy
Middle name
H
Last name
Farkas

Title

Racial and ethnic differences in young men's sex and contraceptive education.

Year of Publication

2015

Number of Pages

464-7

Date Published

2015 Apr

ISSN Number

1879-1972

Abstract

<p><strong>PURPOSE: </strong>Racial/ethnic disparities exist in young men's contraceptive knowledge. This study examines whether the likelihood of receiving sexual health education varies by race/ethnicity.</p>

<p><strong>METHODS: </strong>We examined racial/ethnic differences in sex and contraceptive education both in school and from parents with multivariable logistic regression models among 4,104 men aged 15-24 years using data from the 2006-2010 National Survey of Family Growth.</p>

<p><strong>RESULTS: </strong>Nearly all respondents (96.6%) reported formal sex education. Fewer reported formal birth control education (66.6%), parental sex discussions (66.8%), and parental discussions specifically about birth control (49.2%). In multivariable analysis, black men were less likely than white men to report receiving formal contraceptive education (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], .70; 95% CI, .51-.96). Both black and U.S.-born Hispanic men reported more parental sex discussions than white men (aOR, 1.44; 95% CI, 1.07-1.94, aOR, 1.47; 95% CI, 1.09-1.99, respectively).</p>

<p><strong>CONCLUSIONS: </strong>Nearly all respondents reported having received formal sexual health education. Fewer reported receiving education about birth control either at school or at home. Black men were less likely to report receiving formal contraceptive education.</p>

DOI

10.1016/j.jadohealth.2014.12.014

Alternate Title

J Adolesc Health

PMID

25797633

Title

Racial and/or Ethnic Differences in Formal Sex Education and Sex Education by Parents among Young Women in the United States.

Year of Publication

2016

Number of Pages

69-73

Date Published

2016 Feb

ISSN Number

1873-4332

Abstract

<p><strong>STUDY OBJECTIVE: </strong>We sought to investigate the associations between race and/or ethnicity and young women's formal sex education and sex education by parents.</p>

<p><strong>DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: </strong>Cross-sectional analysis of a nationally representative sample of 1768 women aged 15-24&nbsp;years who participated in the 2011-2013 National Survey of Family Growth.</p>

<p><strong>INTERVENTIONS AND MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: </strong>We assessed 6 main outcomes: participants' report of: (1) any formal sex education; (2) formal contraceptive education; (3) formal sexually transmitted infection (STI) education; (4) any sex education by parents; (5) contraceptive education by parents; and (6) STI education by parents. The primary independent variable was self-reported race and/or ethnicity.</p>

<p><strong>RESULTS: </strong>Nearly all of participants (95%) reported any formal sex education, 68% reported formal contraceptive education, and 92% reported formal STI education. Seventy-five percent of participants reported not having any sex education by parents and only 61% and 56% reported contraceptive and STI education by parents, respectively. US-born Hispanic women were more likely than white women to report STI education by parents (adjusted odds ratio&nbsp;=&nbsp;1.87; 95% confidence interval, 1.17-2.99). No other significant racial and/or ethnic differences in sex education were found.</p>

<p><strong>CONCLUSION: </strong>There are few racial and/or ethnic differences in formal sex education and sex education by parents among young women.</p>

DOI

10.1016/j.jpag.2015.06.011

Alternate Title

J Pediatr Adolesc Gynecol

PMID

26143556

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