First name
Nancy
Last name
Kassam-Adams

Title

COVID-19 Exposure and Family Impact Scales for Adolescents and Young Adults.

Year of Publication

2022

Date Published

2022 Apr 23

ISSN Number

1465-735X

Abstract

<p><strong>OBJECTIVE: </strong>To understand the impact of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic on adolescents and young adults (AYAs), we adapted the COVID-19 Exposure and Family Impact Scales (CEFIS; Kazak et al., 2021) for AYAs. Here, we report on the development, structure, and psychometric properties of the CEFIS-AYA.</p>

<p><strong>METHODS: </strong>The CEFIS-AYA was developed by a multidisciplinary, multi-institutional team using a rapid iterative process. Data from 3,912 AYAs from 21 programs at 16 institutions across the United States were collected from May 2020 to April 2021. We examined the underlying structure of the CEFIS-AYA using principal component analysis (PCA), calculated internal consistencies, and explored differences in scores by gender and age.</p>

<p><strong>RESULTS: </strong>Participants reported exposure to a range of COVID-19-related events (M = 9.08 events, of 28). On the bidirectional 4-point Impact scale, mean item scores were mostly above the midpoint, indicating a slightly negative impact. Kuder-Richardson 20/Cronbach's Alpha was good for Exposure (α = .76) and excellent for Impact (α = .93). PCA identified seven factors for Exposure (Severe COVID-19, Loss of Income, Limited Access to Essentials, COVID-19 Exposure, Disruptions to Activities, Disruptions to Living Conditions, and Designation as an Essential Worker) and five for Impact (Self and Family Relationships, Physical Well-Being, Emotional Well-Being, Social Well-Being, and Distress). Gender and age differences in CEFIS-AYA scores were identified.</p>

<p><strong>DISCUSSION: </strong>Initial reliability data are strong and support use of the CEFIS-AYA for measuring the effect of the COVID-19 pandemic on AYAs in research and clinical care.</p>

DOI

10.1093/jpepsy/jsac036

Alternate Title

J Pediatr Psychol

PMID

35459946

Title

Implementing Family Presence During Pediatric Resuscitations in the Emergency Department: Family-Centered Care and Trauma-Informed Care Best Practices.

Year of Publication

2021

Number of Pages

689-692

Date Published

2021 Sep

ISSN Number

1527-2966

DOI

10.1016/j.jen.2021.07.003

Alternate Title

J Emerg Nurs

PMID

34530971

Title

A Survivor-Derived Approach to Addressing Trafficking in the Pediatric ED.

Year of Publication

2020

Date Published

2020 Dec 17

ISSN Number

1098-4275

Abstract

<p><strong>OBJECTIVES: </strong>Our objective was to elicit the perspectives of survivors of child trafficking on addressing trafficking in the pediatric emergency department (ED) and, secondarily, to provide a survivor-derived framework to help pediatric emergency medicine (PEM) providers discuss trafficking with their patients.</p>

<p><strong>METHODS: </strong>We conducted in-depth, semistructured interviews with young adults who experienced trafficking as children and/or as adolescents. In the interviews, we employed a novel video-elicitation method designed by the research team to elicit detailed participant feedback and recommendations on the pediatric ED through an interactive, immersive discussion with the interviewer. A grounded theory approach was employed.</p>

<p><strong>RESULTS: </strong>Seventeen interviews were conducted revealing the following themes, which we present in an integrated framework for PEM providers: (1) fear is a significant barrier; (2) participants do want PEM providers to ask about trafficking, and it is not harmful to do so; (3) PEM providers should address fear through emphasizing confidentiality and privacy and encouraging agency; (4) PEM providers should approach the patient in a direct, sensitive, and nonjudgmental manner; and (5) changes to the ED environment may facilitate the conversation. Suggested wordings and tips from survivors were compiled.</p>

<p><strong>CONCLUSIONS: </strong>Trafficking survivors feel that the pediatric ED can be a place where they can be asked about trafficking, and that when done in private, it is not harmful or retraumatizing. Fear is a major barrier to disclosure in the pediatric ED setting, and PEM providers can mitigate this by emphasizing privacy and confidentiality and increasing agency by providing choices. PEM providers should be direct, sensitive, and nonjudgmental in their approach to discussing trafficking.</p>

DOI

10.1542/peds.2020-0772

Alternate Title

Pediatrics

PMID

33334922

Title

Acceptability and feasibility of family use of The Cellie Cancer Coping Kit.

Year of Publication

2012

Number of Pages

3315-24

Date Published

2012 Dec

ISSN Number

1433-7339

Abstract

<p><strong>PURPOSE: </strong>This study aims to examine the acceptability and feasibility of child and parent use of The Cellie Cancer Coping Kit (Cellie Kit). The Cellie kit is designed to promote coping and decrease distress in children undergoing pediatric cancer treatment. It includes a plush toy, coping cards, and book for caregivers.</p>

<p><strong>METHODS: </strong>In study 1, 15 children (ages 6-12) undergoing cancer treatment and their parents reviewed the Cellie Kit materials and provided feedback on its acceptability and perceived feasibility of use. In study 2, 15 additional children (ages 6-12) and their parents participated in a pilot intervention of the Cellie Kit and completed follow-up interviews and a satisfaction measure.</p>

<p><strong>RESULTS: </strong>In study 1, all parents reported that they could understand the book and enact its coping tips and that the Cellie Kit was relevant to their families' cancer experience. Children explained they would use the Cellie Kit for emotional expression, fun, and comfort. The Cellie Kit was revised after study 1 to integrate additional material suggested by families. In study 2, all families completing follow-up assessments reported utilizing the Cellie Kit. A majority (86 % of children and 100 % of parents) indicated that they would recommend the Cellie Kit to others, and most (64 % of children and 93 % of parents) reported learning new information and/or skills from the Cellie Kit.</p>

<p><strong>CONCLUSIONS: </strong>The Cellie Kit is an engaging, helpful, and easy-to-use coping tool for families facing pediatric cancer treatment. Future research should examine the efficacy of brief interventions using the Cellie Kit to promote adjustment to pediatric cancer.</p>

DOI

10.1007/s00520-012-1475-y

Alternate Title

Support Care Cancer

PMID

22572922

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