Leading initial
L
First name
Lee
Last name
Dupuis

Title

Guideline for the Management of Fever and Neutropenia in Pediatric Patients With Cancer and Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation Recipients: 2023 Update.

Year of Publication

2023

Number of Pages

JCO2202224

Date Published

01/2023

ISSN Number

1527-7755

Abstract

PURPOSE: To update a clinical practice guideline (CPG) for the empiric management of fever and neutropenia (FN) in pediatric patients with cancer and hematopoietic cell transplantation recipients.

METHODS: The International Pediatric Fever and Neutropenia Guideline Panel reconvened to conduct the second update of this CPG. We updated the previous systematic review to identify new randomized controlled trials (RCTs) evaluating any strategy for the management of FN in pediatric patients. Using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation framework, evidence quality was classified as high, moderate, low, or very low. The panel updated recommendations related to initial management, ongoing management, and empiric antifungal therapy. Changes from the 2017 CPG were articulated, and good practice statements were considered.

RESULTS: We identified 10 new RCTs in addition to the 69 RCTs identified in previous FN CPGs to inform the 2023 FN CPG. Changes from the 2017 CPG included two conditional recommendations regarding (1) discontinuation of empiric antibacterial therapy in clinically well and afebrile patients with low-risk FN if blood cultures remain negative at 48 hours despite no evidence of marrow recovery and (2) pre-emptive antifungal therapy for invasive fungal disease in high-risk patients not receiving antimold prophylaxis. The panel created a good practice statement to initiate FN CPG-consistent empiric antibacterial therapy as soon as possible in clinically unstable febrile patients.

CONCLUSION: The updated FN CPG incorporates important modifications on the basis of recently published trials. Future work should focus on addressing knowledge gaps, improving CPG implementation, and measuring the impact of CPG-consistent care.

DOI

10.1200/JCO.22.02224

Alternate Title

J Clin Oncol

PMID

36689694

Title

Facilitators and barriers to clinical practice guideline-consistent supportive care at pediatric oncology institutions: a Children's Oncology Group study.

Year of Publication

2021

Number of Pages

106

Date Published

2021 Sep 16

ISSN Number

2662-2211

Abstract

<p><strong>BACKGROUND: </strong>Clinical practice guideline (CPG)-consistent care improves patient outcomes, but CPG implementation is poor. Little is known about CPG implementation in pediatric oncology. This study aimed to understand supportive care CPG implementation facilitators and barriers at pediatric oncology National Cancer Institute (NCI) Community Oncology Research Program (NCORP) institutions.</p>

<p><strong>METHODS: </strong>Healthcare professionals at 26 pediatric, Children's&nbsp;Oncology&nbsp;Group-member, NCORP institutions were invited to participate in face-to-face focus groups. Serial focus groups were held until saturation of ideas was reached. Supportive care CPG implementation facilitators and barriers were solicited using nominal group technique (NGT), and implementation of specific supportive care CPG recommendations was discussed. Notes from each focus group were analyzed using a directed content analysis. The top five themes arising from an analysis of NGT items were identified, first from each focus group and then across all focus groups.</p>

<p><strong>RESULTS: </strong>Saturation of ideas was reached after seven focus groups involving 35 participants from 18 institutions. The top five facilitators of CPG implementation identified across all focus groups were organizational factors including charging teams with CPG implementation, individual factors including willingness to standardize care, user needs and values including mentorship, system factors including implementation structure, and implementation strategies including a basis in science. The top five barriers of CPG implementation identified were organizational factors including tolerance for inconsistencies, individual factors including lack of trust, system factors including administrative hurdles, user needs and values including lack of inclusivity, and professional including knowledge gaps.</p>

<p><strong>CONCLUSIONS: </strong>Healthcare professionals at pediatric NCORP institutions believe that organizational factors are the most important determinants of supportive care CPG implementation. They believe that CPG-consistent supportive care is most likely to be delivered in organizations that prioritize evidence-based care, provide structure and resources to implement CPGs, and eliminate implementation barriers.</p>

<p><strong>TRIAL REGISTRATION: </strong>ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02847130. Date of registration: July 28, 2016.</p>

DOI

10.1186/s43058-021-00200-2

Alternate Title

Implement Sci Commun

PMID

34530933

Title

Veno-occlusive disease after high-dose busulfan-melphalan in neuroblastoma.

Year of Publication

2020

Number of Pages

531-537

Date Published

2020 03

ISSN Number

1476-5365

Abstract

<p>Survival for high-risk neuroblastoma patients is still suboptimal. Although stem cell transplantation (SCT) is used, there is no consensus as to which conditioning regimen has the greatest efficacy and fewest toxicities. We assessed the incidence of and risk for hepatic veno-occlusive disease (VOD) for neuroblastoma patients who underwent autologous SCT with busulfan and melphalan (BuMel) at eight centers following Children's Oncology Group (COG)-based induction chemotherapy. Data regarding the patients, SCT characteristics, busulfan steady-state concentrations, incidence of VOD, and survival were evaluated. VOD was defined using the modified Seattle criteria. Possible factors associated with VOD (age, busulfan-pharmacokinetic parameters, history of hepatic dysfunction, and day of neutrophil engraftment) were evaluated. Seventy five patients were included and 23 children (31%) developed VOD at a median of 19 days after SCT (range 14-27 days). VOD was the cause of death in 4 patients (5%). In a multivariable analysis, young age (OR 1.7 (95% CI: 1.16-2.56; p = 0.012))&nbsp;and early day of neutrophil engraftment (OR 1.4 (95% CI: 1.08-2.14; p = 0.041)&nbsp;were associated with the development of VOD. Initial or cumulative busulfan steady-state concentration were not associated with VOD. We found that despite the use of intravenous busulfan with adjusted serum levels, the incidence of VOD remains high in pediatric neuroblastoma patients.</p>

DOI

10.1038/s41409-018-0298-y

Alternate Title

Bone Marrow Transplant

PMID

30181580

Title

Clinical Practice Guideline for Systemic Antifungal Prophylaxis in Pediatric Patients With Cancer and Hematopoietic Stem-Cell Transplantation Recipients.

Year of Publication

2020

Number of Pages

JCO2000158

Date Published

2020 May 27

ISSN Number

1527-7755

Abstract

<p><strong>PURPOSE: </strong>To develop a clinical practice guideline for systemic antifungal prophylaxis in pediatric patients with cancer and hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation (HSCT) recipients.</p>

<p><strong>METHODS: </strong>Recommendations were developed by an international multidisciplinary panel that included a patient advocate. We conducted a systematic review of systemic antifungal prophylaxis in children and adults with cancer and HSCT recipients. The Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation approach was used to make strong or weak recommendations and to classify level of evidence as high, moderate, low, or very low. The panel considered directness of the data to pediatric patients.</p>

<p><strong>RESULTS: </strong>There were 68 randomized trials included in the systematic review, of which 6 (9%) were conducted in a solely pediatric population. Strong recommendations were made to administer systemic antifungal prophylaxis to children and adolescents receiving treatment of acute myeloid leukemia, to those undergoing allogeneic HSCT pre-engraftment, and to those receiving systemic immunosuppression for graft-versus-host disease treatment. A strong recommendation was made to administer a mold-active agent with an echinocandin or a mold-active azole when systemic antifungal prophylaxis is warranted. For children younger than 13 years of age, an echinocandin, voriconazole, or itraconazole is suggested. Posaconazole may also be used in those age 13 years or older. A strong recommendation against routine administration of amphotericin as systemic antifungal prophylaxis was made.</p>

<p><strong>CONCLUSION: </strong>We developed a clinical practice guideline for systemic antifungal prophylaxis administration in pediatric patients with cancer and HSCT recipients. Implementation and assessment of guideline-concordant rates and impacts are important future steps.</p>

DOI

10.1200/JCO.20.00158

Alternate Title

J. Clin. Oncol.

PMID

32459599

Title

Guideline for Antibacterial Prophylaxis Administration in Pediatric Cancer and Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation.

Year of Publication

2019

Date Published

2019 Nov 02

ISSN Number

1537-6591

Abstract

<p><strong>INTRODUCTION: </strong>Bacteremia and other invasive bacterial infections are common among children with cancer receiving intensive chemotherapy and in pediatric recipients of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Systemic antibacterial prophylaxis is one approach that can be used to reduce the risk of these infections. Our purpose was to develop a clinical practice guideline (CPG) for systemic antibacterial prophylaxis administration in pediatric cancer and HSCT patients.</p>

<p><strong>METHODS: </strong>An international and multi-disciplinary panel was convened with representation from pediatric hematology/oncology and HSCT, pediatric infectious diseases (including antibiotic stewardship), nursing, pharmacy, a patient advocate and a CPG methodologist. The panel used the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) approach to generate recommendations based on the results of a systematic review of the literature.</p>

<p><strong>RESULTS: </strong>The systematic review identified 114 eligible randomized trials of antibiotic prophylaxis. The panel made a weak recommendation for systemic antibacterial prophylaxis for children receiving intensive chemotherapy for acute myeloid leukemia and relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Weak recommendations against the routine use of systemic antibacterial prophylaxis were made for children undergoing induction chemotherapy for ALL, autologous HSCT and allogeneic HSCT. A strong recommendation against its routine use was made for children whose therapy is not expected to result in prolonged severe neutropenia. If used, prophylaxis with levofloxacin was recommended during severe neutropenia.</p>

<p><strong>CONCLUSIONS: </strong>We present a CPG for systemic antibacterial prophylaxis administration in pediatric cancer and HSCT patients. Future research should evaluate the long-term effectiveness and adverse effects of prophylaxis.</p>

DOI

10.1093/cid/ciz1082

Alternate Title

Clin. Infect. Dis.

PMID

31676904

Title

Efficacy of antibiotic prophylaxis in patients with cancer and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation recipients: A systematic review of randomized trials.

Year of Publication

2019

Date Published

2019 Jul 05

ISSN Number

2045-7634

Abstract

<p><strong>PURPOSE: </strong>To determine the efficacy and safety of different prophylactic systemic antibiotics in adult and pediatric patients receiving chemotherapy or undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT).</p>

<p><strong>METHODS: </strong>We conducted a systematic review and performed searches of Ovid MEDLINE, MEDLINE in-process and Embase; and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials. Studies were included if patients had cancer or were HSCT recipients with anticipated neutropenia, and the intervention was systemic antibacterial prophylaxis. Strategies synthesized included fluoroquinolone vs no antibiotic/nonabsorbable antibiotic; fluoroquinolone vs trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole; trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole vs no antibiotic; and cephalosporin vs. no antibiotic. Fluoroquinolone vs cephalosporin and levofloxacin vs ciprofloxacin were compared by network meta-analysis. Primary outcome was bacteremia.</p>

<p><strong>RESULTS: </strong>Of 20&nbsp;984 citations screened, 113 studies comparing prophylactic antibiotic to control were included. The following were effective in reducing bacteremia: fluoroquinolone vs no antibiotic/nonabsorbable antibiotic (risk ratio (RR) 0.56, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.41-0.76), trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole vs no antibiotic (RR 0.59, 95% CI 0.41-0.85) and cephalosporin vs no antibiotic (RR 0.30, 95% CI 0.16-0.58). Fluoroquinolone was not significantly associated with increased Clostridium difficile infection (RR 0.62, 95% CI 0.31-1.24) or invasive fungal disease (RR 1.28, 95% CI 0.79-2.08) but did increase resistance to fluoroquinolone among bacteremia isolates (RR 3.35, 95% CI 1.12 to 10.03). Heterogeneity in fluoroquinolone effect on bacteremia was not explained by evaluated study, population, or methodological factors. Network meta-analysis revealed no direct comparisons for pre-specified analyses; superior regimens were not identified.</p>

<p><strong>CONCLUSIONS: </strong>Fluoroquinolone, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, and cephalosporin prophylaxis reduced bacteremia. A clinical practice guideline to facilitate prophylactic antibiotic decision-making is required.</p>

DOI

10.1002/cam4.2395

Alternate Title

Cancer Med

PMID

31274245

Title

Guideline for the Management of Clostridium Difficile Infection in Children and Adolescents With Cancer and Pediatric Hematopoietic Stem-Cell Transplantation Recipients.

Year of Publication

2018

Number of Pages

JCO1800407

Date Published

2018 Sep 14

ISSN Number

1527-7755

Abstract

<p>Purpose The aim of this work was to develop a clinical practice guideline for the prevention and treatment of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) in children and adolescents with cancer and pediatric hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation (HSCT) patients. Methods An international multidisciplinary panel of experts in pediatric oncology and infectious diseases with patient advocate representation was convened. We performed systematic reviews of randomized controlled trials for the prevention or treatment of CDI in any population and considered the directness of the evidence to children with cancer and pediatric HSCT patients. We used the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation approach to generate recommendations. Results The panel made strong recommendations to administer either oral metronidazole or oral vancomycin for the initial treatment of nonsevere CDI and oral vancomycin for the initial treatment of severe CDI. Fidaxomicin may be considered in the setting of recurrent CDI. The panel suggested that probiotics not be routinely used for the prevention of CDI, and that monoclonal antibodies and probiotics not be routinely used for the treatment of CDI. A strong recommendation to not use fecal microbiota transplantation was made in this population. We identified key knowledge gaps and suggested directions for future research. Conclusion We present a guideline for the prevention and treatment of CDI in children and adolescents with cancer and pediatric HSCT patients. Future research should include randomized controlled trials that involve children with cancer and pediatric HSCT patients to improve the management of CDI in this population.</p>

DOI

10.1200/JCO.18.00407

Alternate Title

J. Clin. Oncol.

PMID

30216124

Title

Guideline for the Management of Fever and Neutropenia in Children With Cancer and Hematopoietic Stem-Cell Transplantation Recipients: 2017 Update.

Year of Publication

2017

Number of Pages

JCO2016717017

Date Published

2017 May 01

ISSN Number

1527-7755

Abstract

<p>Purpose To update a clinical practice guideline (CPG) for the empirical management of fever and neutropenia (FN) in children with cancer and hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation recipients. Methods The International Pediatric Fever and Neutropenia Guideline Panel is a multidisciplinary and multinational group of experts in pediatric oncology and infectious diseases that includes a patient advocate. For questions of risk stratification and evaluation, we updated systematic reviews of observational studies. For questions of therapy, we conducted a systematic review of randomized trials of any intervention applied for the empirical management of pediatric FN. The Grading of Recommendation Assessment, Development and Evaluation approach was used to make strong or weak recommendations and to classify levels of evidence as high, moderate, low, or very low. Results Recommendations related to initial presentation, ongoing management, and empirical antifungal therapy of pediatric FN were reviewed; the most substantial changes were related to empirical antifungal therapy. Key differences from our 2012 FN CPG included the listing of a fourth-generation cephalosporin for empirical therapy in high-risk FN, refinement of risk stratification to define patients with high-risk invasive fungal disease (IFD), changes in recommended biomarkers and radiologic investigations for the evaluation of IFD in prolonged FN, and a weak recommendation to withhold empirical antifungal therapy in IFD low-risk patients with prolonged FN. Conclusion Changes to the updated FN CPG recommendations will likely influence the care of pediatric patients with cancer and those undergoing hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation. Future work should focus on closing research gaps and on identifying ways to facilitate implementation and adaptation.</p>

DOI

10.1200/JCO.2016.71.7017

Alternate Title

J. Clin. Oncol.

PMID

28459614

Title

Guideline for the management of fever and neutropenia in children with cancer and/or undergoing hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation.

Year of Publication

2012

Number of Pages

4427-38

Date Published

2012 Dec 10

ISSN Number

1527-7755

Abstract

<p><strong>PURPOSE: </strong>To develop an evidence-based guideline for the empiric management of pediatric fever and neutropenia (FN).</p>

<p><strong>METHODS: </strong>The International Pediatric Fever and Neutropenia Guideline Panel is a multidisciplinary and multinational group composed of experts in pediatric oncology and infectious disease as well as a patient advocate. The Panel was convened for the purpose of creating this guideline. We followed previously validated procedures for creating evidence-based guidelines. Working groups focused on initial presentation, ongoing management, and empiric antifungal therapy. Each working group developed key clinical questions, conducted systematic reviews of the published literature, and compiled evidence summaries. The Grades of Recommendation Assessment, Development, and Evaluation approach was used to generate summaries, and evidence was classified as high, moderate, low, or very low based on methodologic considerations.</p>

<p><strong>RESULTS: </strong>Recommendations were made related to initial presentation (risk stratification, initial evaluation, and treatment), ongoing management (modification and cessation of empiric antibiotics), and empiric antifungal treatment (risk stratification, evaluation, and treatment) of pediatric FN. For each recommendation, the strength of the recommendation and level of evidence are presented.</p>

<p><strong>CONCLUSION: </strong>This guideline represents an evidence-based approach to FN specific to children with cancer. Although some recommendations are similar to adult-based guidelines, there are key distinctions in multiple areas. Implementation will require adaptation to the local context.</p>

DOI

10.1200/JCO.2012.42.7161

Alternate Title

J. Clin. Oncol.

PMID

22987086

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