First name
Andrew
Last name
Suh
Gruver, R. S., Virudachalam, S., Gerdes, M., Shults, J., Suh, A., Bishop, C. T., et al. (2014). Early Childhood Obesity Prevention: Comparing Mothers’ and Clinicians’ Priorities. Pediatric Academic Societies Meeting. Presented at the. (Original work published 05/2014 C.E.)

Title

Distance-Learning, ADHD Quality Improvement in Primary Care: A Cluster-Randomized Trial.

Year of Publication

2017

Date Published

2017 Aug 09

ISSN Number

1536-7312

Abstract

<p><strong>OBJECTIVE: </strong>To evaluate a distance-learning, quality improvement intervention to improve pediatric primary care provider use of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) rating scales.</p>

<p><strong>METHODS: </strong>Primary care practices were cluster randomized to a 3-part distance-learning, quality improvement intervention (web-based education, collaborative consultation with ADHD experts, and performance feedback reports/calls), qualifying for Maintenance of Certification (MOC) Part IV credit, or wait-list control. We compared changes relative to a baseline period in rating scale use by study arm using logistic regression clustered by practice (primary analysis) and examined effect modification by level of clinician participation. An electronic health record-linked system for gathering ADHD rating scales from parents and teachers was implemented before the intervention period at all sites. Rating scale use was ascertained by manual chart review.</p>

<p><strong>RESULTS: </strong>One hundred five clinicians at 19 sites participated. Differences between arms were not significant. From the baseline to intervention period and after implementation of the electronic system, clinicians in both study arms were significantly more likely to administer and receive parent and teacher rating scales. Among intervention clinicians, those who participated in at least 1 feedback call or qualified for MOC credit were more likely to give parents rating scales with differences of 14.2 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.6-27.7) and 18.8 (95% CI, 1.9-35.7) percentage points, respectively.</p>

<p><strong>CONCLUSION: </strong>A 3-part clinician-focused distance-learning, quality improvement intervention did not improve rating scale use. Complementary strategies that support workflows and more fully engage clinicians may be needed to bolster care. Electronic systems that gather rating scales may help achieve this goal. Index terms: ADHD, primary care, quality improvement, clinical decision support.</p>

DOI

10.1097/DBP.0000000000000490

Alternate Title

J Dev Behav Pediatr

PMID

28816912

Title

A Pilot Randomized Trial of a Video Patient Decision Aid to Facilitate Early Intervention Referrals From Primary Care.

Year of Publication

2017

Date Published

Mar 2017

ISSN Number

1938-2707

Abstract

<p>Many young children identified with developmental concerns in pediatric settings do not receive early intervention (EI). We assessed the impact of a video decision aid and text message reminder on knowledge and attitudes regarding developmental delay and EI as well as referral completion. We conducted a pilot randomized controlled trial in an urban setting and enrolled 64 parent-child dyads referred to EI. Compared with controls, participants who received the intervention demonstrated increased knowledge regarding developmental delay and EI as well as more favorable attitudes in certain topics. Although we did not find a significant difference between arms in EI intake and evaluation, we found a pattern suggestive of increased intake and evaluation among participants with low health literacy in the intervention arm. Additional study is needed to identify strategies that improve the EI referral process for families and to understand the potential targeted role for decision aids and text messages.</p>

DOI

10.1177/0009922816677038

Alternate Title

Clin Pediatr (Phila)

PMID

27834191

Title

Asthma Control Test: Comparing Parent Proxy With Parent and Child Report for Children 6 to 12 Years.

Year of Publication

2016

Date Published

2016 Oct 23

ISSN Number

1938-2707

Abstract

<p>We compared results of a modified version of the Asthma Control Test using parent proxy report (PP-ACT) with results reported by children and parents using the validated Childhood-Asthma Control Test (C-ACT). 104 parent-child dyads with a child aged 6 to 12 years with asthma were randomized to complete PP-ACT followed by C-ACT or C-ACT followed by PP-ACT. Scores ≤19 indicated uncontrolled asthma. We calculated sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value for the PP-ACT in comparison with the C-ACT, and calculated concordance between the 2 scales. The PP-ACT had sensitivity of 86% and negative predictive value of 88% for detecting uncontrolled asthma. More than 75% of surveys were concordant (κ = 0.54, moderate agreement). Our results suggest that while the PP-ACT missed few children with uncontrolled asthma and may simplify reporting of asthma control in circumstances when child report is not feasible or creates barriers to survey receipt, limitations of proxy reporting should be considered.</p>

DOI

10.1177/0009922816675013

Alternate Title

Clin Pediatr (Phila)

PMID

27798397

Title

Asthma Control Test: Comparing Parent Proxy With Parent and Child Report for Children 6 to 12 Years

Year of Publication

2016

Date Published

2016 Oct 23

Abstract

We compared results of a modified version of the Asthma Control Test using parent proxy report (PP-ACT) with results reported by children and parents using the validated Childhood-Asthma Control Test (C-ACT). 104 parent-child dyads with a child aged 6 to 12 years with asthma were randomized to complete PP-ACT followed by C-ACT or C-ACT followed by PP-ACT. Scores ≤19 indicated uncontrolled asthma. We calculated sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value for the PP-ACT in comparison with the C-ACT, and calculated concordance between the 2 scales. The PP-ACT had sensitivity of 86% and negative predictive value of 88% for detecting uncontrolled asthma. More than 75% of surveys were concordant (κ = 0.54, moderate agreement). Our results suggest that while the PP-ACT missed few children with uncontrolled asthma and may simplify reporting of asthma control in circumstances when child report is not feasible or creates barriers to survey receipt, limitations of proxy reporting should be considered.

PMID

27798397

Title

Adoption of a Portal for the Primary Care Management of Pediatric Asthma: A Mixed-Methods Implementation Study.

Year of Publication

2016

Number of Pages

e172

Date Published

2016

ISSN Number

1438-8871

Abstract

<p><strong>BACKGROUND: </strong>Patient portals may improve communication between families of children with asthma and their primary care providers and improve outcomes. However, the feasibility of using portals to collect patient-reported outcomes from families and the barriers and facilitators of portal implementation across diverse pediatric primary care settings have not been established.</p>

<p><strong>OBJECTIVE: </strong>We evaluated the feasibility of using a patient portal for pediatric asthma in primary care, its impact on management, and barriers and facilitators of implementation success.</p>

<p><strong>METHODS: </strong>We conducted a mixed-methods implementation study in 20 practices (11 states). Using the portal, parents of children with asthma aged 6-12 years completed monthly surveys to communicate treatment concerns, treatment goals, symptom control, medication use, and side effects. We used logistic regression to evaluate the association of portal use with child characteristics and changes to asthma management. Ten clinician focus groups and 22 semistructured parent interviews explored barriers and facilitators of use in the context of an evidence-based implementation framework.</p>

<p><strong>RESULTS: </strong>We invited 9133 families to enroll and 237 (2.59%) used the portal (range by practice, 0.6%-13.6%). Children of parents or guardians who used the portal were significantly more likely than nonusers to be aged 6-9 years (vs 10-12, P=.02), have mild or moderate/severe persistent asthma (P=.009 and P=.04), have a prescription of a controller medication (P&lt;.001), and have private insurance (P=.002). Portal users with uncontrolled asthma had significantly more medication changes and primary care asthma visits after using the portal relative to the year earlier (increases of 14% and 16%, respectively). Qualitative results revealed the importance of practice organization (coordinated workflows) as well as family (asthma severity) and innovation (facilitated communication and ease of use) characteristics for implementation success.</p>

<p><strong>CONCLUSIONS: </strong>Although use was associated with higher treatment engagement, our results suggest that achieving widespread portal adoption is unlikely in the short term. Implementation efforts should include workflow redesign and prioritize enrollment of symptomatic children.</p>

<p><strong>CLINICALTRIAL: </strong>Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01966068; https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01966068 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6i9iSQkm3).</p>

DOI

10.2196/jmir.5610

Alternate Title

J. Med. Internet Res.

PMID

27357835

Title

Mothers' and Clinicians' Priorities for Obesity Prevention Among Black, High-Risk Infants.

Year of Publication

2016

Date Published

2016 Mar 2

ISSN Number

1873-2607

Abstract

<p><strong>INTRODUCTION: </strong>Despite many recommended strategies for obesity prevention during infancy, effectively delivering recommendations to parents in clinical settings is challenging, especially among high-risk populations. This study describes and compares mothers' and clinicians' priorities for obesity prevention during infancy, to facilitate more-effective obesity prevention messaging.</p>

<p><strong>METHODS: </strong>A discrete choice experiment using maximum difference scaling was administered in 2013 and analyzed in 2013-2014. Twenty-nine low-income, obese mothers of infants and 30 pediatric clinicians from three urban primary care practices rated the relative importance of 16 items relevant to obesity prevention during infancy, in response to this question: Which topic would be most helpful [for new mothers] to learn about to prevent your [their] child from becoming overweight? Response options encompassed the domains of feeding, sleep, parenting (including physical activity and screen time), and maternal self-care.</p>

<p><strong>RESULTS: </strong>Mothers (all Medicaid-enrolled and black; mean age, 27 years; mean BMI, 35 kg/m(2)) and clinicians (97% female, 87% pediatricians, 13% nurse practitioners) both highly prioritized recognizing infant satiety and hunger cues, and appropriate feeding volume. Mothers rated infant physical activity and maintaining regular routines as 3.5 times more important than clinicians did (p&lt;0.001). Clinicians rated breastfeeding as 3.4 times more important than mothers did (p&lt;0.001). Neither group prioritized learning about screen time or maternal self-care.</p>

<p><strong>CONCLUSIONS: </strong>Low-income, obese, black mothers of infants highly prioritized learning about many effective obesity prevention strategies, including recognizing hunger and satiety cues, promoting infant activity, and maintaining regular routines. Clinicians may frame preventive guidance to be responsive to these priorities.</p>

DOI

10.1016/j.amepre.2015.12.015

Alternate Title

Am J Prev Med

PMID

26947214
Fiks, A. G., Gruver, R. S., Virudachalam, S., Gerdes, M., Bishop, C. T., Kalra, G. K., et al. (2014). The Grow2Gether Pilot Study: A Facebook Group Intervention for Mothers to Prevent Obesity from Infancy. Pediatric Academic Societies Meeting. Presented at the. (Original work published 05/2014 C.E.)

Title

Parent-reported outcomes of a shared decision-making portal in asthma: a practice-based RCT.

Year of Publication

2015

Number of Pages

e965-73

Date Published

04/2015

ISSN Number

1098-4275

Abstract

<p><strong>BACKGROUND: </strong>Electronic health record (EHR)-linked patient portals are a promising approach to facilitate shared decision-making between families of children with chronic conditions and pediatricians. This study evaluated the feasibility, acceptability, and impact of MyAsthma, an EHR-linked patient portal supporting shared decision-making for pediatric asthma.</p>

<p><strong>METHODS: </strong>We conducted a 6-month randomized controlled trial of MyAsthma at 3 primary care practices. Families were randomized to MyAsthma, which tracks families' asthma treatment concerns and goals, children's asthma symptoms, medication side effects and adherence, and provides decision support, or to standard care. Outcomes included the feasibility and acceptability of MyAsthma for families, child health care utilization and asthma control, and the number of days of missed school (child) and work (parent). Descriptive statistics and longitudinal regression models assessed differences in outcomes between study arms.</p>

<p><strong>RESULTS: </strong>We enrolled 60 families, 30 in each study arm (mean age 8.3 years); 57% of parents in the intervention group used MyAsthma during at least 5 of the 6 study months. Parents of children with moderate to severe persistent asthma used the portal more than others; 92% were satisfied with MyAsthma. Parents reported that use improved their communication with the office, ability to manage asthma, and awareness of the importance of ongoing attention to treatment. Parents in the intervention group reported that children had a lower frequency of asthma flares and intervention parents missed fewer days of work due to asthma.</p>

<p><strong>CONCLUSIONS: </strong>Use of an EHR-linked asthma portal was feasible and acceptable to families and improved clinically meaningful outcomes.</p>

DOI

10.1542/peds.2014-3167

Alternate Title

Pediatrics

PMID

25755233

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