First name
Adda
Last name
Grimberg

Title

Leg length and sitting height reference data and charts for children in the United States.

Year of Publication

2020

Number of Pages

106131

Date Published

2020 Oct

ISSN Number

2352-3409

Abstract

<p>Population-specific reference data are required to interpret growth measurements in children. Sitting height and leg length (standing height minus sitting height) measurements are indicators of proportionality and can be used to evaluate children with disordered growth. NHANES III recorded sitting height and standing height measurements in a strategic random sample of the United States population from 1988 to 1994, and we have previously published reference charts for sitting height to standing height ratio in this population. In this study, we have developed separate sitting height and leg length reference charts for Non-Hispanic Black, Non-Hispanic White, and Mexican-American children in the United States. In addition, we provide mean (SD) and LMS data to support the use of these reference charts in clinical care.</p>

DOI

10.1016/j.dib.2020.106131

Alternate Title

Data Brief

PMID

32904356

Title

Sitting Height to Standing Height Ratio Reference Charts for Children in the United States.

Year of Publication

2020

Date Published

2020 Jun 21

ISSN Number

1097-6833

Abstract

<p><strong>OBJECTIVE: </strong>To create reference charts for Sitting height to standing height ratio (SitHt/Ht) for children in the United States, and to describe the trajectory of SitHt/Ht during puberty.</p>

<p><strong>STUDY DESIGN: </strong>This was a cross-sectional study using data from the 1988-1994 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey III, a strategic random sample of the United States population. Comparison between Non-Hispanic White (NHW), Non-Hispanic Black (NHB) and Mexican American groups was performed by analysis of variance (ANOVA) to determine if a single population reference chart could be used. ANOVA was used to compare SitHt/Ht in pre-, early and late puberty.</p>

<p><strong>RESULTS: </strong>NHANES III recorded sitting height and standing height measurements in 9,569 children aged 2 to 18 years of NHW (n=2,715), NHB (n=3,336), and Mexican American (n=3,518) ancestry. NHB children had lower SitHt/Ht than NHW and Mexican American children throughout childhood (p &lt; 0.001). In both sexes, SitHt/Ht decreased from prepuberty to early puberty and increased in late puberty. Sex-specific percentile charts of SitHt/Ht vs age were generated for NHB and for NHW and Mexican American youth combined.</p>

<p><strong>CONCLUSIONS: </strong>SitHt/Ht assessment can detect disproportionate short stature in children with skeletal dysplasia, but age-, sex- and population-specific reference charts are required to interpret this measurement. NHB children in the United States have significantly lower SitHt/Ht than other children, which adds complexity to interpretation. We recommend the use of standardized ancestry-specific reference charts in screening for skeletal dysplasias and have developed such charts in this study.</p>

DOI

10.1016/j.jpeds.2020.06.051

Alternate Title

J. Pediatr.

PMID

32579888

Title

Electronic Health Record Mid-Parental Height Auto-Calculator for Growth Assessment in Primary Care.

Year of Publication

2016

Number of Pages

1100-6

Date Published

2016 Oct

ISSN Number

1938-2707

Abstract

<p>Primary care providers are charged with distinguishing children with an underlying growth problem from those with healthy variant short stature. Knowing the heights of the biological parents aids in making that decision. This study sought to determine the feasibility and functionality of an electronic mid-parental height (MPH) auto-calculator in the clinical assessment of child growth in a pediatric primary care setting. Clinicians completed surveys for 62% of 6803 children (mean height 13 ± 7 percentile) with recorded parent heights. Collecting parent height data required &lt;30 seconds in 91% of encounters. The MPH tool confirmed clinicians' initial growth assessment in 79% of cases and changed it in 4%; the remainder did not use the tool. Clinicians who changed assessment were more likely (P &lt; .0001) to pursue more comprehensive evaluation. The MPH tool was a quick, functional resource as a component of an electronic health record system in actual, busy, pediatric primary care practices.</p>

DOI

10.1177/0009922815614352

Alternate Title

Clin Pediatr (Phila)

PMID

26507248

Title

Guidelines for Growth Hormone and Insulin-Like Growth Factor-I Treatment in Children and Adolescents: Growth Hormone Deficiency, Idiopathic Short Stature, and Primary Insulin-Like Growth Factor-I Deficiency.

Year of Publication

2016

Date Published

2016 Nov 25

ISSN Number

1663-2826

Abstract

<p><strong>BACKGROUND/AIMS: </strong>On behalf of the Drug and Therapeutics, and Ethics Committees of the Pediatric Endocrine Society, we sought to update the guidelines published in 2003 on the use of growth hormone (GH). Because idiopathic short stature (ISS) remains a controversial indication, and diagnostic challenges often blur the distinction between ISS, GH deficiency (GHD), and primary IGF-I deficiency (PIGFD), we focused on these three diagnoses, thereby adding recombinant IGF-I therapy to the GH guidelines for the first time.</p>

<p><strong>METHODS: </strong>This guideline was developed following the GRADE approach (Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation).</p>

<p><strong>RESULTS: </strong>This guideline provides recommendations for the clinical management of children and adolescents with growth failure from GHD, ISS, or PIGFD using the best available evidence.</p>

<p><strong>CONCLUSION: </strong>The taskforce suggests that the recommendations be applied in clinical practice with consideration of the evolving literature and the risks and benefits to each individual patient. In many instances, careful review highlights areas that need further research.</p>

DOI

10.1159/000452150

Alternate Title

Horm Res Paediatr

PMID

27884013

Title

Consequences of brand switches during the course of pediatric growth hormone treatment.

Year of Publication

2012

Number of Pages

307-16

Date Published

2012 May-Jun

ISSN Number

1934-2403

Abstract

<p><strong>OBJECTIVE: </strong>To explore the effects of insurance-mandated brand switches during the course of pediatric recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) treatment on clinical practice.</p>

<p><strong>METHODS: </strong>We e-mailed a 9-question, anonymous, Internet-based survey to active members of the Pediatric Endocrine Society. The survey consisted of multiple-choice and yes/no answers. Free-text comments were solicited for further explanation of responses. Quantitative answers were tabulated. Each investigator independently coded the free-text responses; themes based on codes identified by all 3 investigators in a minimum of 5 different respondents' comments were compiled and organized.</p>

<p><strong>RESULTS: </strong>Of the 812 active members of the Pediatric Endocrine Society who were e-mailed the survey, 231 responded. Two hundred eight respondents reported switching a patient's regimen from one rhGH product to another, and of these, 50% experienced repeated switches. Switches occurred for each commercially available rhGH brand. Frequent concerns noted by respondents involved dosing errors and treatment lapses from having to learn a new device and impaired adherence related to patient-family frustration and anxiety. Anti-GH antibodies, measured by only 3 endocrinologists when switching a patient's regimen from one brand to another, were negative before and after the product switch. When a patient switched rhGH brands, the most frequently reported time involvement for endocrine office staff was 2 hours for paperwork, 1 hour for device instruction, and 1 hour for "other" (mostly related to telephone reassurance).</p>

<p><strong>CONCLUSION: </strong>GH brand switches may adversely affect patient care and burden pediatric endocrinology practices.</p>

DOI

10.4158/EP11217.OR

Alternate Title

Endocr Pract

PMID

21940275

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