First name
Lauren
Middle name
D
Last name
Brumley

Title

Psychosocial Correlates and Consequences of Adolescents' Self-Generated Academic Goals and Appraisals.

Year of Publication

2020

Date Published

2020 Nov 07

ISSN Number

1532-7795

Abstract

<p>The current study examined whether characteristics of adolescents (i.e., externalizing problems) and their environments (i.e., social support, adverse childhood experiences) relate to academic goal setting, appraisals, and outcomes. Adolescents (n&nbsp;=&nbsp;99; 87% Black/African American) 13-16&nbsp;years old completed baseline interviews, and 80% also completed follow-up interviews. Adolescents with more externalizing problems set fewer academic goals, and youth with social networks characterized by greater support (and less strain) appraised their academic goals as more supported and achievable. Adolescents' appraisals of their academic goals, but not how many academic goals they had, predicted grades at follow-up. Increasing social support (and reducing social strain) may foster adolescents' positive appraisals of their academic goals, which may promote academic achievement.</p>

DOI

10.1111/jora.12593

Alternate Title

J Res Adolesc

PMID

33159837

Title

Development and Content Validation of the Transition Readiness Inventory Item Pool for Adolescent and Young Adult Survivors of Childhood Cancer.

Year of Publication

2017

Number of Pages

983-994

Date Published

2017 Oct 01

ISSN Number

1465-735X

Abstract

<p><strong>Objective: </strong>The development of the Transition Readiness Inventory (TRI) item pool for adolescent and young adult childhood cancer survivors is described, aiming to both advance transition research and provide an example of the application of NIH Patient Reported Outcomes Information System methods.</p>

<p><strong>Methods: </strong>Using rigorous measurement development methods including mixed methods, patient and parent versions of the TRI item pool were created based on the Social-ecological Model of Adolescent and young adult Readiness for Transition (SMART).</p>

<p><strong>Results: </strong>Each stage informed development and refinement of the item pool. Content validity ratings and cognitive interviews resulted in 81 content valid items for the patient version and 85 items for the parent version.</p>

<p><strong>Conclusions: </strong>TRI represents the first multi-informant, rigorously developed transition readiness item pool that comprehensively measures the social-ecological components of transition readiness. Discussion includes clinical implications, the application of TRI and the methods to develop the item pool to other populations, and next steps for further validation and refinement.</p>

DOI

10.1093/jpepsy/jsx095

Alternate Title

J Pediatr Psychol

PMID

29046041

Title

What a Pain: The Impact of Physical Symptoms and Health Management on Pursuit of Personal Goals Among Adolescents with Cancer.

Year of Publication

2016

Date Published

2016 Oct 28

ISSN Number

2156-535X

Abstract

<p><strong>PURPOSE: </strong>This study examined health-related hindrance (HRH) of personal goals among adolescents receiving treatment for cancer and healthy peers.</p>

<p><strong>METHODS: </strong>Adolescents and parents completed measures of demographics and psychosocial variables. Adolescents reported on their HRH, measured by ratings of the impact of pain, fatigue, other physical symptoms, and doing things to manage their health on self-identified personal goals. Disease-related information was abstracted from patient charts.</p>

<p><strong>RESULTS: </strong>Adolescents with cancer experienced significantly more HRH than healthy peers, and their HRH was significantly associated with poorer health-related quality of life (p &lt; 0.001), negative affect (p = 0.03), and depressive symptoms (p = 0.03). Risk and resilience factors associated with HRH for those with cancer included pain (current and past month severity, frequency, and pain-related quality of life), fatigue, nausea, cognitive problems, worse parent-reported family functioning, and female gender. When testing these significant associates in a regression model predicting HRH among adolescents with cancer, those with more severe pain (p &lt; 0.001) and worse parent-reported family functioning (p = 0.01) were significantly associated with HRH; fatigue was marginally (p = 0.09) significant.</p>

<p><strong>CONCLUSIONS: </strong>Results suggest that HRH is a significant problem for adolescents with cancer, particularly those who are experiencing pain. Addressing pain and other symptom management, enhancing family functioning, and helping adolescents adjust their goals or enhance support for goal pursuit may reduce HRH among adolescents with cancer. This may improve psychosocial well-being, address adolescent unmet needs, and ultimately help adolescents with cancer maintain normal developmental trajectories.</p>

DOI

10.1089/jayao.2016.0031

Alternate Title

J Adolesc Young Adult Oncol

PMID

27792462

Title

Medical and psychosocial associates of nonadherence in adolescents with cancer.

Year of Publication

2015

Number of Pages

103-13

Date Published

2015 Mar-Apr

ISSN Number

1532-8457

Abstract

<p>The current study examined adherence to medication regimens among adolescents with cancer by applying the Pediatric Self-Management Model. Adolescents and their parents reported on adherence to medication, reasons for nonadherence, and patient-, family-, and community-level psychosocial variables. Adolescent- and parent-reported adherence were significantly correlated, with about half of the sample reporting perfect adherence. The majority reported "just forgot" as the most common reason for missed medication. Patient-, family-, and community-level variables were examined as predictors of adherence. With regard to individual factors, adolescents who endorsed perfect adherence reported a greater proportion of future-orientated goals and spent fewer days in outpatient clinic visits. For family factors, adolescents who endorsed perfect adherence reported greater social support from their family and were more likely to have a second caregiver who they perceived as overprotective. The community-level variable (social support from friends) tested did not emerge as a predictor of adherence. The results of this study provide direction for intervention efforts to target adolescent goals and family support in order to increase adolescent adherence to cancer treatment regimens.</p>

DOI

10.1177/1043454214553707

Alternate Title

J Pediatr Oncol Nurs

PMID

25366574

Title

Transitioning Adolescents and Young Adults With Sickle Cell Disease From Pediatric to Adult Health Care: Provider Perspectives.

Year of Publication

2015

Number of Pages

577-83

Date Published

2015 Nov

ISSN Number

1536-3678

Abstract

<p>The transition from pediatric to adult health care is often challenging for adolescents and young adults with sickle cell disease (SCD). Our study aimed to identify (1) measures of success for the transition to adult health care; and (2) barriers and facilitators to this process. We interviewed 13 SCD experts and asked them about their experiences caring for adolescents and young adults with SCD. Our interview guide was developed based on Social-Ecological Model of Adolescent and Young Adult Readiness to Transition framework, and interviews were coded using the constant comparative method. Our results showed that transition success was measured by health care utilization, quality of life, and continuation on a stable disease trajectory. We also found that barriers to transition include negative experiences in the emergency department, sociodemographic factors, and adolescent skills. Facilitators include a positive relationship with the provider, family support, and developmental maturity. Success in SCD transition is primarily determined by the patients' quality of relationships with their parents and providers and their developmental maturity and skills. Understanding these concepts will aid in the development of future evidence-based transition care models.</p>

DOI

10.1097/MPH.0000000000000427

Alternate Title

J. Pediatr. Hematol. Oncol.

PMID

26492583

Title

Barriers and facilitators to successful transition from pediatric to adult inflammatory bowel disease care from the perspectives of providers.

Year of Publication

2014

Number of Pages

2083-91

Date Published

2014 Nov

ISSN Number

1536-4844

Abstract

<p><strong>BACKGROUND: </strong>For adolescents and young adults (AYA) with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), the transition from pediatric to adult care is often challenging and associated with gaps in care. Our study objectives were to (1) identify outcomes for evaluating transition success and (2) elicit the major barriers and facilitators of successful transition.</p>

<p><strong>METHODS: </strong>We interviewed pediatric and adult IBD providers from across the United States with experience caring for AYAs with IBD until thematic saturation was reached after 12 interviews. We elicited the participants' backgrounds, examples of successful and unsuccessful transition of AYAs for whom they cared, and recommendations for improving transition using the Social-Ecological Model of Adolescent and Young Adult Readiness to Transition framework. We coded interview transcripts using the constant comparative method and identified major themes.</p>

<p><strong>RESULTS: </strong>Participants reported evaluating transition success and failure using health care utilization outcomes (e.g., maintaining continuity with adult providers), health outcomes (e.g., stable symptoms), and quality of life outcomes (e.g., attending school). The patients' level of developmental maturity (i.e., ownership of care) was the most prominent determinant of transition outcomes. The style of parental involvement (i.e., helicopter parent versus optimally involved parent) and the degree of support by providers (e.g., care coordination) also influenced outcomes.</p>

<p><strong>CONCLUSIONS: </strong>IBD transition success is influenced by a complex interplay of patient developmental maturity, parenting style, and provider support. Multidisciplinary IBD care teams should aim to optimize these factors for each patient to increase the likelihood of a smooth transfer to adult care.</p>

DOI

10.1097/MIB.0000000000000136

Alternate Title

Inflamm. Bowel Dis.

PMID

25137417

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