First name
Zhaohui
Last name
Zheng

Title

Identification of Predictive Biomarkers for Cytokine Release Syndrome after Chimeric Antigen Receptor T-cell Therapy for Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

Year of Publication

2016

Number of Pages

664-79

Date Published

2016 06

ISSN Number

2159-8290

Abstract

<p><strong>UNLABELLED: </strong>Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-modified T cells with anti-CD19 specificity are a highly effective novel immune therapy for relapsed/refractory acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Cytokine release syndrome (CRS) is the most significant and life-threatening toxicity. To improve understanding of CRS, we measured cytokines and clinical biomarkers in 51 CTL019-treated patients. Peak levels of 24 cytokines, including IFNγ, IL6, sgp130, and sIL6R, in the first month after infusion were highly associated with severe CRS. Using regression modeling, we could accurately predict which patients would develop severe CRS with a signature composed of three cytokines. Results were validated in an independent cohort. Changes in serum biochemical markers, including C-reactive protein and ferritin, were associated with CRS but failed to predict development of severe CRS. These comprehensive profiling data provide novel insights into CRS biology and, importantly, represent the first data that can accurately predict which patients have a high probability of becoming critically ill.</p>

<p><strong>SIGNIFICANCE: </strong>CRS is the most common severe toxicity seen after CAR T-cell treatment. We developed models that can accurately predict which patients are likely to develop severe CRS before they become critically ill, which improves understanding of CRS biology and may guide future cytokine-directed therapy. Cancer Discov; 6(6); 664-79. ©2016 AACR.See related commentary by Rouce and Heslop, p. 579This article is highlighted in the In This Issue feature, p. 561.</p>

DOI

10.1158/2159-8290.CD-16-0040

Alternate Title

Cancer Discov

PMID

27076371

Title

Chimeric antigen receptor T cells for sustained remissions in leukemia.

Year of Publication

2014

Number of Pages

1507-17

Date Published

2014 Oct 16

ISSN Number

1533-4406

Abstract

<p><strong>BACKGROUND: </strong>Relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is difficult to treat despite the availability of aggressive therapies. Chimeric antigen receptor-modified T cells targeting CD19 may overcome many limitations of conventional therapies and induce remission in patients with refractory disease.</p>

<p><strong>METHODS: </strong>We infused autologous T cells transduced with a CD19-directed chimeric antigen receptor (CTL019) lentiviral vector in patients with relapsed or refractory ALL at doses of 0.76×10(6) to 20.6×10(6) CTL019 cells per kilogram of body weight. Patients were monitored for a response, toxic effects, and the expansion and persistence of circulating CTL019 T cells.</p>

<p><strong>RESULTS: </strong>A total of 30 children and adults received CTL019. Complete remission was achieved in 27 patients (90%), including 2 patients with blinatumomab-refractory disease and 15 who had undergone stem-cell transplantation. CTL019 cells proliferated in vivo and were detectable in the blood, bone marrow, and cerebrospinal fluid of patients who had a response. Sustained remission was achieved with a 6-month event-free survival rate of 67% (95% confidence interval [CI], 51 to 88) and an overall survival rate of 78% (95% CI, 65 to 95). At 6 months, the probability that a patient would have persistence of CTL019 was 68% (95% CI, 50 to 92) and the probability that a patient would have relapse-free B-cell aplasia was 73% (95% CI, 57 to 94). All the patients had the cytokine-release syndrome. Severe cytokine-release syndrome, which developed in 27% of the patients, was associated with a higher disease burden before infusion and was effectively treated with the anti-interleukin-6 receptor antibody tocilizumab.</p>

<p><strong>CONCLUSIONS: </strong>Chimeric antigen receptor-modified T-cell therapy against CD19 was effective in treating relapsed and refractory ALL. CTL019 was associated with a high remission rate, even among patients for whom stem-cell transplantation had failed, and durable remissions up to 24 months were observed. (Funded by Novartis and others; CART19 ClinicalTrials.gov numbers, NCT01626495 and NCT01029366.).</p>

DOI

10.1056/NEJMoa1407222

Alternate Title

N. Engl. J. Med.

PMID

25317870

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