First name
Jennifer
Middle name
J
Last name
Wilkes

Title

Rates of laboratory adverse events by course in paediatric leukaemia ascertained with automated electronic health record extraction: a retrospective cohort study from the Children's Oncology Group.

Year of Publication

2022

Number of Pages

e678-e688

Date Published

07/2022

ISSN Number

2352-3026

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Adverse events are often misreported in clinical trials, leading to an incomplete understanding of toxicities. We aimed to test automated laboratory adverse event ascertainment and grading (via the ExtractEHR automated package) to assess its scalability and define adverse event rates for children with acute myeloid leukaemia and acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

METHODS: For this retrospective cohort study from the Children's Oncology Group (COG), we included patients aged 0-22 years treated for acute myeloid leukaemia or acute lymphoblastic leukaemia at Children's Healthcare of Atlanta (Atlanta, GA, USA) from Jan 1, 2010, to Nov 1, 2018, at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (Philadelphia, PA, USA) from Jan 1, 2011, to Dec 31, 2014, and at the Texas Children's Hospital (Houston, TX, USA) from Jan 1, 2011, to Dec 31, 2014. The ExtractEHR automated package acquired, cleaned, and graded laboratory data as per Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE) version 5 for 22 commonly evaluated grade 3-4 adverse events (fatal events were not evaluated) with numerically based CTCAE definitions. Descriptive statistics tabulated adverse event frequencies. Adverse events ascertained by ExtractEHR were compared to manually reported adverse events for patients enrolled in two COG trials (AAML1031, NCT01371981; AALL0932, NCT02883049). Analyses were restricted to protocol-defined chemotherapy courses (induction I, induction II, intensification I, intensification II, and intensification III for acute myeloid leukaemia; induction, consolidation, interim maintenance, delayed intensification, and maintenance for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia).

FINDINGS: Laboratory adverse event data from 1077 patients (583 from Children's Healthcare of Atlanta, 200 from the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, and 294 from the Texas Children's Hospital) who underwent 4611 courses (549 for acute myeloid leukaemia and 4062 for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia) were extracted, processed, and graded. Of the 166 patients with acute myeloid leukaemia, 86 (52%) were female, 80 (48%) were male, 96 (58%) were White, and 132 (80%) were non-Hispanic. Of the 911 patients with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia, 406 (45%) were female, 505 (55%) were male, 596 (65%) were White, and 641 (70%) were non-Hispanic. Patients with acute myeloid leukaemia had the most adverse events during induction I and intensification II. Hypokalaemia (one [17%] of six to 75 [48%] of 156 courses) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) increased (13 [10%] of 134 to 27 [17%] of 156 courses) were the most prevalent non-haematological adverse events in patients with acute myeloid leukaemia, as identified by ExtractEHR. Patients with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia had the greatest number of adverse events during induction and maintenance (eight adverse events with prevalence ≥10%; induction and maintenance: anaemia, platelet count decreased, white blood cell count decreased, neutrophil count decreased, lymphocyte count decreased, ALT increased, and hypocalcaemia; induction: hypokalaemia; maintenance: aspartate aminotransferase [AST] increased and blood bilirubin increased), as identified by ExtractEHR. 187 (85%) of 220 total comparisons in 22 adverse events in four AAML1031 and six AALL0923 courses were substantially higher with ExtractEHR than COG-reported adverse event rates for adverse events with a prevalence of at least 2%.

INTERPRETATION: ExtractEHR is scalable and accurately defines laboratory adverse event rates for paediatric acute leukaemia; moreover, ExtractEHR seems to detect higher rates of laboratory adverse events than those reported in COG trials. These rates can be used for comparisons between therapies and to counsel patients treated on or off trials about the risks of chemotherapy. ExtractEHR-based adverse event ascertainment can improve reporting of laboratory adverse events in clinical trials.

FUNDING: US National Institutes of Health, St Baldrick's Foundation, and Alex's Lemonade Stand Foundation.

DOI

10.1016/S2352-3026(22)00168-5

Alternate Title

Lancet Haematol

PMID

35870472

Title

Rates of laboratory adverse events by course in paediatric leukaemia ascertained with automated electronic health record extraction: a retrospective cohort study from the Children's Oncology Group.

Year of Publication

2022

Number of Pages

e678-e688

Date Published

07/2022

ISSN Number

2352-3026

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Adverse events are often misreported in clinical trials, leading to an incomplete understanding of toxicities. We aimed to test automated laboratory adverse event ascertainment and grading (via the ExtractEHR automated package) to assess its scalability and define adverse event rates for children with acute myeloid leukaemia and acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

METHODS: For this retrospective cohort study from the Children's Oncology Group (COG), we included patients aged 0-22 years treated for acute myeloid leukaemia or acute lymphoblastic leukaemia at Children's Healthcare of Atlanta (Atlanta, GA, USA) from Jan 1, 2010, to Nov 1, 2018, at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (Philadelphia, PA, USA) from Jan 1, 2011, to Dec 31, 2014, and at the Texas Children's Hospital (Houston, TX, USA) from Jan 1, 2011, to Dec 31, 2014. The ExtractEHR automated package acquired, cleaned, and graded laboratory data as per Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE) version 5 for 22 commonly evaluated grade 3-4 adverse events (fatal events were not evaluated) with numerically based CTCAE definitions. Descriptive statistics tabulated adverse event frequencies. Adverse events ascertained by ExtractEHR were compared to manually reported adverse events for patients enrolled in two COG trials (AAML1031, NCT01371981; AALL0932, NCT02883049). Analyses were restricted to protocol-defined chemotherapy courses (induction I, induction II, intensification I, intensification II, and intensification III for acute myeloid leukaemia; induction, consolidation, interim maintenance, delayed intensification, and maintenance for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia).

FINDINGS: Laboratory adverse event data from 1077 patients (583 from Children's Healthcare of Atlanta, 200 from the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, and 294 from the Texas Children's Hospital) who underwent 4611 courses (549 for acute myeloid leukaemia and 4062 for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia) were extracted, processed, and graded. Of the 166 patients with acute myeloid leukaemia, 86 (52%) were female, 80 (48%) were male, 96 (58%) were White, and 132 (80%) were non-Hispanic. Of the 911 patients with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia, 406 (45%) were female, 505 (55%) were male, 596 (65%) were White, and 641 (70%) were non-Hispanic. Patients with acute myeloid leukaemia had the most adverse events during induction I and intensification II. Hypokalaemia (one [17%] of six to 75 [48%] of 156 courses) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) increased (13 [10%] of 134 to 27 [17%] of 156 courses) were the most prevalent non-haematological adverse events in patients with acute myeloid leukaemia, as identified by ExtractEHR. Patients with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia had the greatest number of adverse events during induction and maintenance (eight adverse events with prevalence ≥10%; induction and maintenance: anaemia, platelet count decreased, white blood cell count decreased, neutrophil count decreased, lymphocyte count decreased, ALT increased, and hypocalcaemia; induction: hypokalaemia; maintenance: aspartate aminotransferase [AST] increased and blood bilirubin increased), as identified by ExtractEHR. 187 (85%) of 220 total comparisons in 22 adverse events in four AAML1031 and six AALL0923 courses were substantially higher with ExtractEHR than COG-reported adverse event rates for adverse events with a prevalence of at least 2%.

INTERPRETATION: ExtractEHR is scalable and accurately defines laboratory adverse event rates for paediatric acute leukaemia; moreover, ExtractEHR seems to detect higher rates of laboratory adverse events than those reported in COG trials. These rates can be used for comparisons between therapies and to counsel patients treated on or off trials about the risks of chemotherapy. ExtractEHR-based adverse event ascertainment can improve reporting of laboratory adverse events in clinical trials.

FUNDING: US National Institutes of Health, St Baldrick's Foundation, and Alex's Lemonade Stand Foundation.

DOI

10.1016/S2352-3026(22)00168-5

Alternate Title

Lancet Haematol

PMID

35870472

Title

Risk of bacterial bloodstream infection does not vary by central-line type during neutropenic periods in pediatric acute myeloid leukemia.

Year of Publication

2022

Number of Pages

1-8

Date Published

2022 Apr 25

ISSN Number

1559-6834

Abstract

<p><strong>BACKGROUND: </strong>Bloodstream infections (BSIs) are a frequent cause of morbidity in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML), due in part to the presence of central venous access devices (CVADs) required to deliver therapy.</p>

<p><strong>OBJECTIVE: </strong>To determine the differential risk of bacterial BSI during neutropenia by CVAD type in pediatric patients with AML.</p>

<p><strong>METHODS: </strong>We performed a secondary analysis in a cohort of 560 pediatric patients (1,828 chemotherapy courses) receiving frontline AML chemotherapy at 17 US centers. The exposure was CVAD type at course start: tunneled externalized catheter (TEC), peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC), or totally implanted catheter (TIC). The primary outcome was course-specific incident bacterial BSI; secondary outcomes included mucosal barrier injury (MBI)-BSI and non-MBI BSI. Poisson regression was used to compute adjusted rate ratios comparing BSI occurrence during neutropenia by line type, controlling for demographic, clinical, and hospital-level characteristics.</p>

<p><strong>RESULTS: </strong>The rate of BSI did not differ by CVAD type: 11 BSIs per 1,000 neutropenic days for TECs, 13.7 for PICCs, and 10.7 for TICs. After adjustment, there was no statistically significant association between CVAD type and BSI: PICC incident rate ratio [IRR] = 1.00 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.75-1.32) and TIC IRR = 0.83 (95% CI, 0.49-1.41) compared to TEC. When MBI and non-MBI were examined separately, results were similar.</p>

<p><strong>CONCLUSIONS: </strong>In this large, multicenter cohort of pediatric AML patients, we found no difference in the rate of BSI during neutropenia by CVAD type. This may be due to a risk-profile for BSI that is unique to AML patients.</p>

DOI

10.1017/ice.2022.82

Alternate Title

Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol

PMID

35465865

Title

Medical Outcomes, Quality of Life, and Family Perceptions for Outpatient vs Inpatient Neutropenia Management After Chemotherapy for Pediatric Acute Myeloid Leukemia.

Year of Publication

2021

Number of Pages

e2128385

Date Published

2021 Oct 01

ISSN Number

2574-3805

Abstract

<p><strong>Importance: </strong>Pediatric acute myeloid leukemia (AML) requires multiple courses of intensive chemotherapy that result in neutropenia, with significant risk for infectious complications. Supportive care guidelines recommend hospitalization until neutrophil recovery. However, there are little data to support inpatient over outpatient management.</p>

<p><strong>Objective: </strong>To evaluate outpatient vs inpatient neutropenia management for pediatric AML.</p>

<p><strong>Design, Setting, and Participants: </strong>This cohort study used qualitative and quantitative methods to compare medical outcomes, patient health-related quality of life (HRQOL), and patient and family perceptions between outpatient and inpatient neutropenia management. The study included patients from 17 US pediatric hospitals with frontline chemotherapy start dates ranging from January 2011 to July 2019, although the specific date ranges differed for the individual analyses by design and relative timing. Data were analyzed from August 2019 to February 2020.</p>

<p><strong>Exposures: </strong>Discharge to outpatient vs inpatient neutropenia management.</p>

<p><strong>Main Outcomes and Measures: </strong>The primary outcomes of interest were course-specific bacteremia incidence, times to next course, and patient HRQOL. Course-specific mortality was a secondary medical outcome.</p>

<p><strong>Results: </strong>Primary quantitative analyses included 554 patients (272 [49.1%] girls and 282 [50.9%] boys; mean [SD] age, 8.2 [6.1] years). Bacteremia incidence was not significantly different during outpatient vs inpatient management (67 courses [23.8%] vs 265 courses [29.0%]; adjusted rate ratio, 0.73; 95% CI, 0.56 to 1.06; P = .08). Outpatient management was not associated with delays to the next course compared with inpatient management (mean [SD] 30.7 [12.2] days vs 32.8 [9.7] days; adjusted mean difference, -2.2; 95% CI, -4.1 to -0.2, P = .03). Mortality during intensification II was higher for patients who received outpatient management compared with those who received inpatient management (3 patients [5.4%] vs 1 patient [0.5%]; P = .03), but comparable with inpatient management at other courses (eg, 0 patients vs 5 patients [1.3%] during induction I; P = .59). Among 97 patients evaluated for HRQOL, outcomes did not differ between outpatient and inpatient management (mean [SD] Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory total score, 70.1 [18.9] vs 68.7 [19.4]; adjusted mean difference, -2.8; 95% CI, -11.2 to 5.6). A total of 86 respondents (20 [23.3%] in outpatient management, 66 [76.7%] in inpatient management) completed qualitative interviews. Independent of management strategy received, 74 respondents (86.0%) expressed satisfaction with their experience. Concerns for hospital-associated infections among caregivers (6 of 7 caregiver respondents [85.7%] who were dissatisfied with inpatient management) and family separation (2 of 2 patient respondents [100%] who were dissatisfied with inpatient management) drove dissatisfaction with inpatient management. Stress of caring for a neutropenic child at home (3 of 3 respondents [100%] who were dissatisfied with outpatient management) drove dissatisfaction with outpatient management.</p>

<p><strong>Conclusions and Relevance: </strong>This cohort study found that outpatient neutropenia management was not associated with higher bacteremia incidence, treatment delays, or worse HRQOL compared with inpatient neutropenia management among pediatric patients with AML. While outpatient management may be safe for many patients, course-specific mortality differences suggest that outpatient management in intensification II should be approached with caution. Patient and family experiences varied, suggesting that outpatient management may be preferred by some but may not be feasible for all families. Further studies to refine and standardize safe outpatient management practices are warranted.</p>

DOI

10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2021.28385

Alternate Title

JAMA Netw Open

PMID

34709389

Title

Identifying relapses and stem cell transplants in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia using administrative data: Capturing national outcomes irrespective of trial enrollment.

Year of Publication

2020

Number of Pages

e28315

Date Published

2020 May 11

ISSN Number

1545-5017

Abstract

<p><strong>INTRODUCTION: </strong>Our objectives were to design and validate methods to identify relapse and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) using administrative data representing hospitalizations at US pediatric institutions.</p>

<p><strong>METHODS: </strong>We developed daily billing and ICD-9 code definitions to identify relapses and HSCTs within a cohort of children with newly diagnosed ALL between January 1, 2004, and December 31, 2013, previously assembled from the Pediatric Health Information System (PHIS) database. Chart review for children with ALL at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) and Texas Children's Hospital (TCH) was performed to establish relapse and HSCT gold standards for sensitivity and positive predictive value (PPV) calculations. We estimated incidences of relapse and HSCT in the PHIS ALL cohort.</p>

<p><strong>RESULTS: </strong>We identified 362 CHOP and 314 TCH ALL patients in PHIS and established true positives by chart review. Sensitivity and PPV for identifying both relapse and HSCT in PHIS were&nbsp;&gt;&nbsp;90% at both hospitals. Five-year relapse incidence in the 10&nbsp;150-patient PHIS cohort was 10.3% (95% CI 9.8%-10.9%) with 7.1% (6.6%-7.6%) of children underwent HSCTs. Patients in higher-risk demographic groups had higher relapse and HSCT rates. Our analysis also identified differences in incidences of relapse and HSCT by race, ethnicity, and insurance status.</p>

<p><strong>CONCLUSIONS: </strong>Administrative data can be used to identify relapse and HSCT accurately in children with ALL whether they occur on- or off-therapy, in contrast with published approaches. This method has wide potential applicability for estimating these incidences in pediatric ALL, including patients not enrolled on clinical trials.</p>

DOI

10.1002/pbc.28315

Alternate Title

Pediatr Blood Cancer

PMID

32391940

Title

Multisite external validation of a risk prediction model for the diagnosis of blood stream infections in febrile pediatric oncology patients without severe neutropenia.

Year of Publication

2017

Date Published

2017 May 23

ISSN Number

1097-0142

Abstract

<p><strong>BACKGROUND: </strong>Pediatric oncology patients are at an increased risk of invasive bacterial infection due to immunosuppression. The risk of such infection in the absence of severe neutropenia (absolute neutrophil count ≥ 500/μL) is not well established and a validated prediction model for blood stream infection (BSI) risk offers clinical usefulness.</p>

<p><strong>METHODS: </strong>A 6-site retrospective external validation was conducted using a previously published risk prediction model for BSI in febrile pediatric oncology patients without severe neutropenia: the Esbenshade/Vanderbilt (EsVan) model. A reduced model (EsVan2) excluding 2 less clinically reliable variables also was created using the initial EsVan model derivative cohort, and was validated using all 5 external validation cohorts. One data set was used only in sensitivity analyses due to missing some variables.</p>

<p><strong>RESULTS: </strong>From the 5 primary data sets, there were a total of 1197 febrile episodes and 76 episodes of bacteremia. The overall C statistic for predicting bacteremia was 0.695, with a calibration slope of 0.50 for the original model and a calibration slope of 1.0 when recalibration was applied to the model. The model performed better in predicting high-risk bacteremia (gram-negative or Staphylococcus aureus infection) versus BSI alone, with a C statistic of 0.801 and a calibration slope of 0.65. The EsVan2 model outperformed the EsVan model across data sets with a C statistic of 0.733 for predicting BSI and a C statistic of 0.841 for high-risk BSI.</p>

<p><strong>CONCLUSIONS: </strong>The results of this external validation demonstrated that the EsVan and EsVan2 models are able to predict BSI across multiple performance sites and, once validated and implemented prospectively, could assist in decision making in clinical practice. Cancer 2017. © 2017 American Cancer Society.</p>

DOI

10.1002/cncr.30792

Alternate Title

Cancer

PMID

28542918

Title

The Role of Acuity of Illness at Presentation in Early Mortality in Black Children with Acute Myeloid Leukemia.

Year of Publication

2016

Date Published

2016 Nov 10

ISSN Number

1096-8652

Abstract

<p>Black patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) experience higher mortality than White patients. We compared induction mortality, acuity of illness prior to chemotherapy, and insurance type between Black and White patients to assess whether acuity of presentation mediates the disparity. Within a retrospective cohort of 1,122 children with AML treated with two courses of standard induction chemotherapy between 2004 to 2014 in the Pediatric Health Information System (PHIS) database, the association between race (Black versus White) and inpatient mortality during induction was examined. Intensive Care Unit (ICU)-level resource utilization during the first 72 hours following admission for initial AML chemotherapy was evaluated as a potential mediator. The total effect of race on mortality during Induction I revealed a strong association (unadjusted HR 2.75, CI: 1.18, 6.41). Black patients had a significantly higher unadjusted risk of requiring ICU-level resources within the first 72 hours after initial presentation (17% versus 11%; RR 1.52, CI: 1.04, 2.24). Mediation analyses revealed the indirect effect of race through acuity accounted for 61% of the relative excess mortality during Induction I. Publicly insured patients experienced greater induction mortality than privately insured patients regardless of race. Black patients with AML have significantly greater risk of induction mortality and are at increased risk for requiring ICU-level resources soon after presentation. Higher acuity amongst Black patients accounts for a substantial portion of the relative excess mortality during Induction I. Targeting factors affecting acuity of illness at presentation may lessen racial disparities in AML induction mortality. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.</p>

DOI

10.1002/ajh.24605

Alternate Title

Am. J. Hematol.

PMID

27862214

Title

Low rates of pregnancy screening in adolescents before teratogenic exposures in a national sample of children's hospitals.

Year of Publication

2016

Number of Pages

3394-400

Date Published

2016 Nov 15

ISSN Number

1097-0142

Abstract

<p><strong>BACKGROUND: </strong>Adolescents with cancer engage in sexual behaviors and are exposed to teratogenic chemotherapy. There are no data regarding pregnancy screening patterns for adolescents before chemotherapy exposure.</p>

<p><strong>METHODS: </strong>A cross-sectional study of leukemia and emergency room (ER) admissions in the Pediatric Health Information System from 1999 to 2011 was conducted. Females who were 10 to 18 years old and 1) had newly diagnosed acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) or acute myeloid leukemia (AML) or 2) had ER visits with computed tomography (CT) of the abdomen/pelvis were included. The exposure was a hospital visit with either chemotherapy or an abdominal/pelvic CT scan. The main outcome was a pregnancy test billed on the same day or before the teratogenic exposure within the same index admission. Log-binomial regressions were used to compute prevalence ratios and 95% confidence intervals comparing pregnancy screening in the leukemia and ER cohorts.</p>

<p><strong>RESULTS: </strong>A total of 35,650 admissions were identified. The proportion of visits with an appropriately timed pregnancy test was 35%, 64%, and 58% in the ALL (n = 889), AML (n = 127), and ER cohorts (n = 34,634), respectively. Patients with ALL were significantly less likely to have a pregnancy test than the ER cohort (adjusted prevalence ratio, 0.71; 95% confidence interval, 0.65-0.78), but there was no significant difference between the AML and ER cohorts (adjusted prevalence ratio, 1.12; 95% confidence interval, 0.99-1.27). There was substantial hospital-level variation in pregnancy screening patterns.</p>

<p><strong>CONCLUSIONS: </strong>Adolescents with acute leukemia and ER visits have low rates of pregnancy screening before teratogenic exposures. Standardized practice guidelines for pregnancy screening among adolescents may improve screening rates. Cancer 2016. © 2016 American Cancer Society.</p>

DOI

10.1002/cncr.30225

Alternate Title

Cancer

PMID

27618636

Title

Volume-Outcome Relationships in Pediatric Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: Association Between Hospital Pediatric and Pediatric Oncology Volume With Mortality and Intensive Care Resources During Initial Therapy.

Year of Publication

2016

Date Published

2016 May 4

ISSN Number

2152-2669

Abstract

<p><strong>BACKGROUND: </strong>There are few contemporary studies of volume-outcome relationships in pediatric oncology. Children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) are treated at a wide variety of hospitals. We investigated if inpatient hospital volume influences outcomes. The objective of this study was to evaluate the relationship between inpatient pediatric and pediatric oncology volume and mortality and intensive care resources (ICU care). We hypothesized an inverse relationship between volume and these outcomes.</p>

<p><strong>PATIENTS AND METHODS: </strong>This was a retrospective cohort study. Patients 0 to 18 years of age in the Pediatric Health Information System or Perspective Premier Database from 2009 to 2011 with ALL were included. Exposures were considered as the average inpatient pediatric and pediatric oncology volume. The primary outcome was inpatient mortality; secondary outcome was need for ICU care.</p>

<p><strong>RESULTS: </strong>The included population comprised 3350 patients from 75 hospitals. The inpatient mortality rate was 0.86% (95% confidence interval, 0.58%-1.2%). In the unadjusted analysis, mortality increased as pediatric oncology volume increased from low (0%) to high volume (1.3%) (P&nbsp;= .009). The small number of deaths precluded multivariable analysis of this outcome. Pediatric and pediatric oncology volume was not associated with ICU care when we controlled for potential confounders.</p>

<p><strong>CONCLUSION: </strong>Induction mortality was low. We did not observe an inverse relationship between volume and mortality or ICU care. This suggests that in a modern treatment era, treatment at a low-volume center might not be associated with increased mortality or ICU care in the first portion of therapy. This relationship should be evaluated in other oncology populations with higher mortality rates and with longer-term outcomes.</p>

DOI

10.1016/j.clml.2016.04.016

Alternate Title

Clin Lymphoma Myeloma Leuk

PMID

27246140

Title

FDG-PET in two cases of neurofibromatosis type 1 and atypical malignancies.

Year of Publication

2014

Number of Pages

e345-8

Date Published

2014 Apr

ISSN Number

1198-0052

Abstract

<p>Patients with neurofibromatosis type 1 (nf1) are at increased risk for both benign and malignant tumours, and distinguishing the malignant potential of an individual tumour is a common clinical problem in these patients. Here, we review two cases of uncommon malignancies (Hodgkin lymphoma and mediastinal germ-cell tumour) in patients with nf1. Although (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron-emission tomography (fdg-pet) has been used to differentiate benign neurofibromas from malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumours, fdg-pet characteristics for more rare tumours have been poorly described in children with nf1. Here, we report the role of pet imaging in clinical decision-making in each case. In nf1, fdg-pet might be useful in the clinical management of unusual tumour presentations and might help to provide information about the malignant potential of uncommon tumours.</p>

DOI

10.3747/co.21.1803

Alternate Title

Curr Oncol

PMID

24764718

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